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How Important is walking around during labor? - Page 3

post #41 of 86

Have you thought about getting a midwife instead of an OB?  If not a doula is a must for you I think.

 

I had a midwife at a hospital birth.  With my midwife I didn't have to have constant fetal monitoring so I wasn't required to be in bed  I walked around the floor in early labor, and did different movements all around my room during labor too.  It hurt the WORST when they made me stay in bed (for monitoring or other reasons).  When not in labor I tend to move around with pain anyways (lke cramping or if I cut myself) so I knew I needed to move around in labor.  Plus, being bed ridden during labor I feel is the worst for the mother!  It is the worst position to give birth in, the baby and your body are working against gravity if laying down, standing & rocking help bring the baby down.  It can mean the difference between a vaginal birth and a c-section.

post #42 of 86

I'm not in Michigan but my first home birth was 100% covered by Medicaid so it may very well be worth looking into!

 

On the induction note -- just come back when you're around 38 weeks (to the birth and beyond or pregnancy forum) with a thread saying your doctor wants to induce you for: post-dates, tremendously huge baby he's predicting, low amniotic fluid, or any number of very, very common (and imo, absolutely ridiculous) non-reasons and scare tactics OBs commonly employ and you'll get pages of responses lol I don't mean to be cynical but it's so common, and with a doctor who is already talking induction possibilities at 27 weeks I would not at all be surprised.

 

I feel some commiseration here because it was around the 27 week mark when I really began researching and learning about the current climate of obstetric care and my eyes were opened to a lot of issues surrounding pregnancy and birth I wasn't even aware of as an intelligent woman who felt I had been proactive in getting information. The mamas on the natural birthing websites really helped to steer me in the direction of where I wanted to be and helped me find the information I needed to get there. grouphug.gif I switched to a home birth midwife (which medicaid paid for) and then to yet another home birth midwife at around 38 weeks. Until the baby is actually crowing, it's not too late to change directions lol

 

It's so wonderful to see a mama who is so invested in her labor/birth process and so eager for input and information! It's so promising :)

 

 

 

post #43 of 86
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tumble Bumbles View Post

I'm not in Michigan but my first home birth was 100% covered by Medicaid so it may very well be worth looking into!

 

On the induction note -- just come back when you're around 38 weeks (to the birth and beyond or pregnancy forum) with a thread saying your doctor wants to induce you for: post-dates, tremendously huge baby he's predicting, low amniotic fluid, or any number of very, very common (and imo, absolutely ridiculous) non-reasons and scare tactics OBs commonly employ and you'll get pages of responses lol I don't mean to be cynical but it's so common, and with a doctor who is already talking induction possibilities at 27 weeks I would not at all be surprised.

 

I feel some commiseration here because it was around the 27 week mark when I really began researching and learning about the current climate of obstetric care and my eyes were opened to a lot of issues surrounding pregnancy and birth I wasn't even aware of as an intelligent woman who felt I had been proactive in getting information. The mamas on the natural birthing websites really helped to steer me in the direction of where I wanted to be and helped me find the information I needed to get there. grouphug.gif I switched to a home birth midwife (which medicaid paid for) and then to yet another home birth midwife at around 38 weeks. Until the baby is actually crowing, it's not too late to change directions lol

 

It's so wonderful to see a mama who is so invested in her labor/birth process and so eager for input and information! It's so promising :)

 

 

 


I'm just so stuck on who and where to call! I had a heck of a time getting medical coverage set up in order to get prenatal appointments, everyone led me round and round for weeks since it was my first time doing it on my own.

 

I think I remember looking up if this Medicaid here covers homebirths; and while they do cover in-hospital Midwives, they don't cover anything outside of hospitals.

 

My fiance and I were doing research before pregnancy was even a risk. Most of the things I've found happened out of pure coincidence(or was it...?) It seems like every other day I'm sharing with my mom new things that I've found out, and it sets us on a long-hour conversation about it, :-D I am so very fortunate to have a receptive mom who instead of being "stuck in the times", is so open and trusting of the faith that I have in these things being true. Which is, again, why I'm almost stupidly hoping for a long labor because I'd really enjoy her being there for the birth of her grandson. Honestly, I'm to the point where nothing surprises me anymore. It's all just.....so logical; disturbing the natural process warrants medical intervention.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greenlea View Post

Have you thought about getting a midwife instead of an OB?  If not a doula is a must for you I think.

 

I had a midwife at a hospital birth.  With my midwife I didn't have to have constant fetal monitoring so I wasn't required to be in bed  I walked around the floor in early labor, and did different movements all around my room during labor too.  It hurt the WORST when they made me stay in bed (for monitoring or other reasons).  When not in labor I tend to move around with pain anyways (lke cramping or if I cut myself) so I knew I needed to move around in labor.  Plus, being bed ridden during labor I feel is the worst for the mother!  It is the worst position to give birth in, the baby and your body are working against gravity if laying down, standing & rocking help bring the baby down.  It can mean the difference between a vaginal birth and a c-section.



I think I stand more of a chance finding a doula near here than a midwife. I did the most extensive research for a midwife with the intention of having a home birth, but there are absolutely none close-by. :/  And few in Michigan take Medicaid, and the ones that did were too far out there, I wouldn't have felt right contacting them to come over. It must be difficult to want natural methods for women so much, but not make much off of it. And yes, I've read that those positions are the worst to give birth in, and purely for the comfort of the doctor. I'm increasingly amazed that pushing nature along faster than it's designed to go typically warrant otherwise unnecessary medical interventions. I share this information with my mom(and sometimes my dad if he seems receptive that day), and they're increasingly amazed too. My mom retells the routine procedures when she gave birth to my brother(she had to have a C-section for me due to placenta previa), and often wonders if she would have had the same freedom of choice that women seem to have now, or at least....which women seem to realize that they have now.

post #44 of 86

I just want to say that I had two midwife attended hospital births in upstate NY and they were, for the most part, great. During the first birth I had some problems with a nurse that kept asking if I wanted pain meds (despite my birth plan specifically stating not to ask me) and constantly putting me on continuous external fetal monitoring. My midwife had another patient down the hall so every time she would come in to check on me she would rip it all off and the nurse would later put it back on, arg. I was not in a state to refuse it, especially once transition hit, even though I would say my labors, up until transition, were very easy. So definitely consider the fact that you will be very focused on what you are doing, and may not be able to adequately focus on what your caregivers are doing. This is where the previous posters' advice about having a spokesperson, either your husband or doula or whomever, is very important. I'd say even your husband is not enough... mine was so busy tending to my immediate needs he wasn't in a place to argue with the nurse either!

 

That being said, I don't really have any other complaints. I had natural births, and I was encouraged to eat, drink, walk around (even up and down the halls), get into the hot tub and shower, basically do whatever I wanted. I had an IV because of my GBS+ status, but it was the type that closes off when not in use, so except for the brief times I was actually getting the antibiotic, I was not attached to the IV pole and could go in the water and everything. Also, I was still allowed to move around when I was getting the antibiotic, they just had my husband mind the pole.

 

I would think that if the hospital has all those friendly birthing aids (balls, wedges, etc), they are at least somewhat progressive and probably are ok with you moving around. I wouldn't COUNT on this, though, definitely call and talk to someone there. Maybe try to contact the director of labor & delivery?

 

As far as your OB goes, I would be concerned. This sounds like someone who doesn't trust women's bodies to know what they are doing- I could be wrong, but that's my feeling. When I had my first two girls I was on Medi-caid and I went to a practice that had 4 midwives and an OB for higher-risk pregnancies and emergency c-sections. The midwives were great and the OB really seemed to have the attitude that he was just there for when things went wrong. That's a great attitude to have! Things can go wrong and modern medical practices can be great for those times, but for everything else it should be about you directing things, because your body really does know what to do!

 

Anyway, I would look into finding a midwife that works with the hospital. It's more than possible to have a safe and satisfactory birth in a hospital, even one with not-stellar intervention rates, but you really need a supportive caregiver. You are getting to the point where it may be difficult to change caregivers, so I would get on it really quickly. Even if you decide to stick with your current OB you will feel better if you explored your options.

 

Good luck! There are many ways to get the birth you want, so take heart!

post #45 of 86
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by katroshka View Post

I just want to say that I had two midwife attended hospital births in upstate NY and they were, for the most part, great. During the first birth I had some problems with a nurse that kept asking if I wanted pain meds (despite my birth plan specifically stating not to ask me) and constantly putting me on continuous external fetal monitoring. My midwife had another patient down the hall so every time she would come in to check on me she would rip it all off and the nurse would later put it back on, arg. I was not in a state to refuse it, especially once transition hit, even though I would say my labors, up until transition, were very easy. So definitely consider the fact that you will be very focused on what you are doing, and may not be able to adequately focus on what your caregivers are doing. This is where the previous posters' advice about having a spokesperson, either your husband or doula or whomever, is very important. I'd say even your husband is not enough... mine was so busy tending to my immediate needs he wasn't in a place to argue with the nurse either!

 

That being said, I don't really have any other complaints. I had natural births, and I was encouraged to eat, drink, walk around (even up and down the halls), get into the hot tub and shower, basically do whatever I wanted. I had an IV because of my GBS+ status, but it was the type that closes off when not in use, so except for the brief times I was actually getting the antibiotic, I was not attached to the IV pole and could go in the water and everything. Also, I was still allowed to move around when I was getting the antibiotic, they just had my husband mind the pole.

 

I would think that if the hospital has all those friendly birthing aids (balls, wedges, etc), they are at least somewhat progressive and probably are ok with you moving around. I wouldn't COUNT on this, though, definitely call and talk to someone there. Maybe try to contact the director of labor & delivery?

 

As far as your OB goes, I would be concerned. This sounds like someone who doesn't trust women's bodies to know what they are doing- I could be wrong, but that's my feeling. When I had my first two girls I was on Medi-caid and I went to a practice that had 4 midwives and an OB for higher-risk pregnancies and emergency c-sections. The midwives were great and the OB really seemed to have the attitude that he was just there for when things went wrong. That's a great attitude to have! Things can go wrong and modern medical practices can be great for those times, but for everything else it should be about you directing things, because your body really does know what to do!

 

Anyway, I would look into finding a midwife that works with the hospital. It's more than possible to have a safe and satisfactory birth in a hospital, even one with not-stellar intervention rates, but you really need a supportive caregiver. You are getting to the point where it may be difficult to change caregivers, so I would get on it really quickly. Even if you decide to stick with your current OB you will feel better if you explored your options.

 

Good luck! There are many ways to get the birth you want, so take heart!


Thank you. I tried looking for a birth center near here, but the closest one is 45 minutes away. And gas is getting expensive... I'm pretty sure I can get a CNM to accompany me along with my OB, because the Medicaid/Health Plan DOES cover hospital-attending midwives. Thanks for sharing your positive experience; many of you guys seem to be getting red flags about my OB, which is okay! I like him because he's funny and puts me at ease(especially when I had my first pelvic exam done, I was so nervous!), but I definitely won't let him push me around into doing things my body is against. Like I've said, I try not to shelve blame on the doctors or nurses...they're only doing what they were taught, and often don't seem to think there are other methods, and since it seems the hospital is really my only option because it's much closer than 45 minutes, my best course of action appears to be to make sure I have those to vouch for my wants and desires. 

 

I can't seem to find any statistics for the hospital online. So I think my next step was......call Human Resources I think someone said?

 

Anyway, wow! It's so much information to absorb. I thought I pretty much had all the chaos figured out BEFORE our boy decides to make his entrance, but apparently not, lol. Need to remember to ask for a nurse familliar with natural childbirth upon admittance..contact the labor/delivery director, find a midwife or a doula to accompany me and be the stable-mind while my husband paces around in disbelief...lol, I have my work cut out for me. Anyone else have any more suggestions before my mind 'splodes? :P

post #46 of 86

I very strongly feel that I had a C-section due to lack of mobility. I soo soo wanted to move but as a previous poster said, once the heart rate started going down, I lost the will to fight for my rights in the interest of continuously monitoring to make sure baby was doing fine. I don't have regrets now as such, but think! If I had had normal delivery, I would be trying to re-start for another one now. Of course, if AF had returned that is.

post #47 of 86


Thank you. I tried looking for a birth center near here, but the closest one is 45 minutes away. And gas is getting expensive... I'm pretty sure I can get a CNM to accompany me along with my OB, because the Medicaid/Health Plan DOES cover hospital-attending midwives. Thanks for sharing your positive experience; many of you guys seem to be getting red flags about my OB, which is okay! I like him because he's funny and puts me at ease(especially when I had my first pelvic exam done, I was so nervous!), but I definitely won't let him push me around into doing things my body is against. Like I've said, I try not to shelve blame on the doctors or nurses...they're only doing what they were taught, and often don't seem to think there are other methods, and since it seems the hospital is really my only option because it's much closer than 45 minutes, my best course of action appears to be to make sure I have those to vouch for my wants and desires. 

 

I can't seem to find any statistics for the hospital online. So I think my next step was......call Human Resources I think someone said?

 

Anyway, wow! It's so much information to absorb. I thought I pretty much had all the chaos figured out BEFORE our boy decides to make his entrance, but apparently not, lol. Need to remember to ask for a nurse familliar with natural childbirth upon admittance..contact the labor/delivery director, find a midwife or a doula to accompany me and be the stable-mind while my husband paces around in disbelief...lol, I have my work cut out for me. Anyone else have any more suggestions before my mind 'splodes? :P



You won't be able to get a CNM to accompany your doctor to your delivery, CNMs are independent providers who are paid separately for their service.  So Medicaid will pay for either a CNM or an OB to attend your delivery but not both (obviously if a CNM has to consult with an OB during delivery etc that is paid for).  So if you would like a CNM you need to find one now, see her or him for prenatal care, and they will attend you in labor. 

 

You can check out the website www.midwife.org to find midwives in your area.  Once you have that list you can simply call them to ask if they take Medicaid.  Most midwife practices do. I would also consider that birth center that is 45 minutes away-  45 minutes is not long in the grand scheme of things and may very well make a huge difference.  Gas is expensive but there are expenses associated with staying in a hospital for 2-3 days, food for your partner, parking, gas for your partner to go back and forth, etc. 

 

I would honestly tell you that if I were you I would definitely find another provider.  Any obstetrician who truly believes that it is dangerous for a laboring woman to move around is clearly not supportive of birth outside the "usual."  Right now you have a run of the mill, typical OB who is (based on what you have said) not supportive of natural birth.  Inducing at 41 weeks, continuous monitoring, no food in labor, and bedrest are all red flags.  Definitely take a tour of the labor and delivery unit and ask all of your questions-- that will give you a better idea of the hospital policies.  But, although your doc will not be there for your labor, he will make the decisions of what will be done and tell your nurse.  She does not have the power to change those things unless he okays it (I am a nurse midwife, former L & D nurse, this is how it works).  Pay close attention to how the staff answers your questions, if you ask if people labor in the shower are they clearly supportive of it, or do they say it's a possibilty. 

 

Best of luck.  Obviously women have natural and wonderful births in less than ideal settings but as a first time mom you would do yourself a huge favor to set yourself up in a supportive environment.  I would encourage every woman to have a doula in every circumstance, but honestly with your provider I think you will find things so restrictive that your doula's hands will be tied on many things as well.

 

 

post #48 of 86

also, the hospital will not give out stats unless you live in the states where it is mandated-- NY, NJ and one other I think.  In other states they are not obligated to give out that info and typically will not.  They will track it for productivity purposes, but it is not comomn knowledge.  HR wouldn't have them though, your best bet would be talking to the manager of the L & D unit.

post #49 of 86

I think that the option of mobility is crucially important - for me, with an OP, then OT, then OA baby and a long labour, laying down felt like torture.  Luckily my hospital encourages walking and moving.  I did end up with an epi, but that was after 36 hours total and I'd been in the hospital for 12 hours and we tried EVERYTHING else first.  My nurses were awesome. 

 

I would really clear up what exactly that means, and look into another hospital if they truly mean that you MUST stay in bed during your whole labour.  Not just because of that issue but because to me that would be a sign that the whole hospital hasn't made it out of the 70's in terms of their practices and I would guess will have other archaic practices like mandatory nursery time, mandatory formula, episiotomies, etc.

post #50 of 86

I really do not want to upset you here, but a lot of times Drs say x,y,z and then when you are actually laboring in a hospital it turns out the nurses and Drs take control and demand this and that of you or keep pressuring and pressuring. I would be VERY surprised if they don't routinely use drugs. PIT is and has been pushed on every woman *I* have seen labor at a hospital.

 

Walking during labor is pretty vital. I had a hypnobirth in a birthcenter and the MW even interrupted me and asked me to walk around to help get the baby going.

 

IDK if you HAVE to have a hospital birth for some reason (I did not read the whole thread) but I would try and avoid this at all costs personally. My biggest fear is birthing in a hospital.

post #51 of 86

Also my birth center was 2hrs from me, but it was that important. We are low income but we made it work with the gas since our insurance covered the birth.

 

The next baby will be at home and will cost us about $3,500. Again it is that important.

 

How much did you pay for your wedding? You don't think 45mins worth of gas, what a few hundred dollars if that is worth it?

 

IT REALLY really is! I guarantee it.

 

grouphug.gif I know how stressful it can be. I had DD drug free on my terms at at a birth center at 21 y/o and with no family...just DH (then DP) and I. I had to research like a crazy woman to even find my birth center, they kept the info so hidden. I had been seeing a regular OB at my local hospital before I switched at like 26wks! I knew I could not trust the hospital or myself to not have drugs in that setting.

 

I don't think any amount of time or money isn't worth birthing comfortably and naturally. There is nothing more special in the whole world.

 

Good luck.

post #52 of 86

This is what I was thinking. When I had DS2 (VBAC) I was up walking around the room pretty much from the second I got there. I also didn't want an epi. After it was determined that I was going to be admitted, the nurse put wireless fetal/contraction monitors on me. Does your hospital have those? It was kind of funny--she'd clearly not used them very often, if at all, and asked me if I was planning on walking down the halls because she didn't know how long the range was. :D I was able to labor for about six hours at the hospital like that, until the shift change when the new nurse that came on duty said I needed to get in bed because she couldn't get a good reading on the monitors with me walking around. (Uh, here's a clue--I'm going to have a BABY. Soon.)

 

As for how important walking around in general is, I really feel that that combined with having no epi/pit was what made for a successful VBAC in my case. Will you have a doula or someone else there to advocate for you? I did end up getting in bed when the nurse asked and my son was born very quickly after that, but for me the pain was much worse on my back when it had been manageable walking around.

 

Good luck OP, and best wishes!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tracymom1 View Post

What the doctor may have meant is that you cannot roam the halls while in labor. Hospitals like to keep you in your room for a variety of safety reasons (like if a problem arises such as bleeding or syncope you will not be far away from the equipment they need to provide care). I can't see ehy you wouldn't be able to move about your room, that is if you are not getting pain meds.
post #53 of 86

Double post, oops.

post #54 of 86

I found that moving around was the only thing that managed my pain.  The doctors wanted to monitor me and could only pick up the heartbeat when I was in a specific position in bed - the one that did not work well pain wise!  They did let me get out of bed to go to the bathroom, so I had to pee very often :-)  I do believe that moving around is an essential part of childbirth.  If I could do my first over again, I would choose a different hospital - their marketing material was great, but they really pushed meds, constant monitoring and being restricted to bed.  If I couldn't get a different hospital, I would get a doula.  I think it would be very helpful having someone with you who can point out what your options are instead of just following the providers preferred route (which may be easier on the provider but harder on you!).  To be honest, my doctor was ok with everything I wanted but wasn't the doctor on duty when I had my daughter. Regardless, it was really the nurses that were establishing the way things were going. 

This time around, I am going with a midwife at a different hospital :-)

As far as vetting the hospital, ask questions like "when do you feel a mom needs to be restricted to bed?"  "In what situations do you monitor the mom.  How is that done?"  "What is your policy on monitoring pain levels?  How is that done?"  (My hospital considered their requirement to monitor pain levels a mandate to push drugs every time they check on you).  "How many moms have drug-free childbirth? What techniques do you encourage them to use to manage the labor?"  (A lot of people consider natural = vaginal, and  will not give the right info if you just ask about natural childbirth).  Getting them to explain their policies might give you a clearer picture of how they really treat their patients.

post #55 of 86

You have gotten a wealth of great info here..and I do 2nd Ina Mays book. But the one thing I try to make sure that every mother knows is that you DO have choices. Even in a hospital setting. I birthed my twins in a hospital after I risked out of the homebirthed I had planned. Not only did I walk around and up and down the halls, I got in the shower/tub after my water had already broken (it broke before I went in), I refused IV ports, I refused continued monitoring and I still had a natural, vaginal birth with one being a footling breech, AND I did it in my room. I refused the OR even though it was "hospital policy" That may be THEIR policy.. but this is YOUR birth! Your child! And as long as everything is okay with baby.. there is NO reason for them to invade and take over.  I can honestly tell you, the hospital staff were NOT happy. In fact. They were ticked off at me.. the head of staff even came and tried to get me to the OR.. but I had warned my Midwife and the OB a head of time.. I knew my rights and I was going to assert them if I needed too.

 

Don't get scared of what they tell you. Do your research, hire a doula who has done hers and will tell you, your options. And be strong. Have YOUR birth. :)

post #56 of 86

It can be a huge deal! I had my son in a hospital too, but I made sure I was allowed to move around before I decided on the hospital I went to. I had a pretty long labor and the only thing that made me progress was walking all over the hospital with my doula. I had a lot of back labor, so when I couldn't walk very far anymore my doula suggested that I switch positions from my back to my knees. Once I did that the baby moved and the pain switched from my tailbone to my lower abdomen and soon I felt like I needed to push. I am sure that if I had not been allowed to move, I would have ended up with a c-section because I would not have progressed quickly enough.

 

By the way, my number one recommendation for all women who are pregnant is to get a doula! It doesn't matter what kind of birth you are planning on. It is so important to have someone with you who knows all about having a baby and how to help a mother with the pain and emotions of childbirth. Our doula also helped us communicate what we wanted to the hospital staff, so we didn't have to worry about anything other than having a baby. After I had my son, my husband and I both agreed we couldn't have done it without our doula!

post #57 of 86
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hasya View Post

I very strongly feel that I had a C-section due to lack of mobility. I soo soo wanted to move but as a previous poster said, once the heart rate started going down, I lost the will to fight for my rights in the interest of continuously monitoring to make sure baby was doing fine. I don't have regrets now as such, but think! If I had had normal delivery, I would be trying to re-start for another one now. Of course, if AF had returned that is.

I'm so sorry! I've read of that happening, :/ Restricting nature, or trying to push nature along faster than what she's willing to do warrants medical intervention. It's a horrible, terrible cycle. But then again, a long time ago I made the connection that we're the only species who's routinely "forced" to give birth in er.....well, sometimes, the same position we conceived in. I'd like to see someone trying to force something that could do them serious harm, to give birth in the position they felt was best for the animal. It wouldn't work out so well, would it? I've never worked on a farm, or really *been* on one, but I think trying to force a horse to give birth in the position you felt was best would probably earn you a swift kick to the chest.
 

     Quote:

Originally Posted by CEG View Post




Thank you. I tried looking for a birth center near here, but the closest one is 45 minutes away. And gas is getting expensive... I'm pretty sure I can get a CNM to accompany me along with my OB, because the Medicaid/Health Plan DOES cover hospital-attending midwives. Thanks for sharing your positive experience; many of you guys seem to be getting red flags about my OB, which is okay! I like him because he's funny and puts me at ease(especially when I had my first pelvic exam done, I was so nervous!), but I definitely won't let him push me around into doing things my body is against. Like I've said, I try not to shelve blame on the doctors or nurses...they're only doing what they were taught, and often don't seem to think there are other methods, and since it seems the hospital is really my only option because it's much closer than 45 minutes, my best course of action appears to be to make sure I have those to vouch for my wants and desires. 

 

I can't seem to find any statistics for the hospital online. So I think my next step was......call Human Resources I think someone said?

 

Anyway, wow! It's so much information to absorb. I thought I pretty much had all the chaos figured out BEFORE our boy decides to make his entrance, but apparently not, lol. Need to remember to ask for a nurse familliar with natural childbirth upon admittance..contact the labor/delivery director, find a midwife or a doula to accompany me and be the stable-mind while my husband paces around in disbelief...lol, I have my work cut out for me. Anyone else have any more suggestions before my mind 'splodes? :P



You won't be able to get a CNM to accompany your doctor to your delivery, CNMs are independent providers who are paid separately for their service.  So Medicaid will pay for either a CNM or an OB to attend your delivery but not both (obviously if a CNM has to consult with an OB during delivery etc that is paid for).  So if you would like a CNM you need to find one now, see her or him for prenatal care, and they will attend you in labor. 

 

You can check out the website www.midwife.org to find midwives in your area.  Once you have that list you can simply call them to ask if they take Medicaid.  Most midwife practices do. I would also consider that birth center that is 45 minutes away-  45 minutes is not long in the grand scheme of things and may very well make a huge difference.  Gas is expensive but there are expenses associated with staying in a hospital for 2-3 days, food for your partner, parking, gas for your partner to go back and forth, etc. 

 

I would honestly tell you that if I were you I would definitely find another provider.  Any obstetrician who truly believes that it is dangerous for a laboring woman to move around is clearly not supportive of birth outside the "usual."  Right now you have a run of the mill, typical OB who is (based on what you have said) not supportive of natural birth.  Inducing at 41 weeks, continuous monitoring, no food in labor, and bedrest are all red flags.  Definitely take a tour of the labor and delivery unit and ask all of your questions-- that will give you a better idea of the hospital policies.  But, although your doc will not be there for your labor, he will make the decisions of what will be done and tell your nurse.  She does not have the power to change those things unless he okays it (I am a nurse midwife, former L & D nurse, this is how it works).  Pay close attention to how the staff answers your questions, if you ask if people labor in the shower are they clearly supportive of it, or do they say it's a possibilty. 

 

Best of luck.  Obviously women have natural and wonderful births in less than ideal settings but as a first time mom you would do yourself a huge favor to set yourself up in a supportive environment.  I would encourage every woman to have a doula in every circumstance, but honestly with your provider I think you will find things so restrictive that your doula's hands will be tied on many things as well.

 

 

Oh! Okay. That's my bad, then, I read the information wrong. You do bring up a good point about considering the birth center that's 45 minutes away, and I had been thinking about that last night. It is only once, at least until my fiance and I get on our feet. There's just so many options to consider. I'm getting help from all over the place and I didn't expect it! Thanks, I'll definitely put more consideration into it, :) I don't want to fully lean one way or another until I can find out what the hospital policies truly are, and if by "not moving around" he really meant out into the hall, or not moving around, period. In the event he meant not moving around, period, then I think I know the route I'll have to go.

 

     Quote:

Originally Posted by CEG View Post

also, the hospital will not give out stats unless you live in the states where it is mandated-- NY, NJ and one other I think.  In other states they are not obligated to give out that info and typically will not.  They will track it for productivity purposes, but it is not comomn knowledge.  HR wouldn't have them though, your best bet would be talking to the manager of the L & D unit.

Yup...the only statistics I could find were heart problem statistics, but that was absolutely it!

 

     Quote:

Originally Posted by Twinklefae View Post

I think that the option of mobility is crucially important - for me, with an OP, then OT, then OA baby and a long labour, laying down felt like torture.  Luckily my hospital encourages walking and moving.  I did end up with an epi, but that was after 36 hours total and I'd been in the hospital for 12 hours and we tried EVERYTHING else first.  My nurses were awesome. 

 

I would really clear up what exactly that means, and look into another hospital if they truly mean that you MUST stay in bed during your whole labour.  Not just because of that issue but because to me that would be a sign that the whole hospital hasn't made it out of the 70's in terms of their practices and I would guess will have other archaic practices like mandatory nursery time, mandatory formula, episiotomies, etc.

Definitely. I chose this one because I had heard great news about it, especially from several that gave birth there. But then again...not every women knows about giving birth any other way that what the hospital does as routine, does she? It can be so very shady, :/ I know my mom didn't, and I wouldn't have if I didn't get the idea to start researching. The fact that you can control how your birthing experience goes, should definitely be more widely available.
 

     Quote:

Originally Posted by sosurreal09 View Post

I really do not want to upset you here, but a lot of times Drs say x,y,z and then when you are actually laboring in a hospital it turns out the nurses and Drs take control and demand this and that of you or keep pressuring and pressuring. I would be VERY surprised if they don't routinely use drugs. PIT is and has been pushed on every woman *I* have seen labor at a hospital.

 

Walking during labor is pretty vital. I had a hypnobirth in a birthcenter and the MW even interrupted me and asked me to walk around to help get the baby going.

 

IDK if you HAVE to have a hospital birth for some reason (I did not read the whole thread) but I would try and avoid this at all costs personally. My biggest fear is birthing in a hospital.

I've been thinking about the possibility of that, :/ It all seemed "too good to be true", you know? And though I never voiced it to my fiance, it almost felt like he was saying, "Yes, we do that." just to make me happy. Instinct? Or being a worry wort? I'm not really sure. I was surprised to hear they have birthing balls, and birthing stools and wedge supports, and the squat bars attached to the beds.... but walking around is a no(which, again, I will check into)? Another thing that puts up a red flag even for me is the cord clamping. In the little room where they take my blood pressure and check my weight, just outside of the bathroom where I pee in a cup, there's a poster right next to the chair that goes through the stages of delivery. Down near the bottom, accompanied with a picture says, "...and after the baby is born, the cord is clamped..." but yet, according to my OB, they don't routinely do early cord clamping? ..... But why would their poster say that's just what's DONE after baby is born?

 

     Quote:

Originally Posted by sosurreal09 View Post

Also my birth center was 2hrs from me, but it was that important. We are low income but we made it work with the gas since our insurance covered the birth.

 

The next baby will be at home and will cost us about $3,500. Again it is that important.

 

How much did you pay for your wedding? You don't think 45mins worth of gas, what a few hundred dollars if that is worth it?

 

IT REALLY really is! I guarantee it.

 

grouphug.gif I know how stressful it can be. I had DD drug free on my terms at at a birth center at 21 y/o and with no family...just DH (then DP) and I. I had to research like a crazy woman to even find my birth center, they kept the info so hidden. I had been seeing a regular OB at my local hospital before I switched at like 26wks! I knew I could not trust the hospital or myself to not have drugs in that setting.

 

I don't think any amount of time or money isn't worth birthing comfortably and naturally. There is nothing more special in the whole world.

 

Good luck.

We're actually not married. Technically we're only engaged, but we often consider each other husband and wife even without the paper document. :)  He doesn't care where I do it, just so long as someone's there with the appropriate tools to fix something if it goes awry. He's a fearful first-time daddy, so I can't blame him. Thanks for the support, grouphug.gif
 

     Quote:

Originally Posted by KayTeeJay View Post

This is what I was thinking. When I had DS2 (VBAC) I was up walking around the room pretty much from the second I got there. I also didn't want an epi. After it was determined that I was going to be admitted, the nurse put wireless fetal/contraction monitors on me. Does your hospital have those? It was kind of funny--she'd clearly not used them very often, if at all, and asked me if I was planning on walking down the halls because she didn't know how long the range was. :D I was able to labor for about six hours at the hospital like that, until the shift change when the new nurse that came on duty said I needed to get in bed because she couldn't get a good reading on the monitors with me walking around. (Uh, here's a clue--I'm going to have a BABY. Soon.)

 

As for how important walking around in general is, I really feel that that combined with having no epi/pit was what made for a successful VBAC in my case. Will you have a doula or someone else there to advocate for you? I did end up getting in bed when the nurse asked and my son was born very quickly after that, but for me the pain was much worse on my back when it had been manageable walking around.

 

Good luck OP, and best wishes!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tracymom1 View Post

What the doctor may have meant is that you cannot roam the halls while in labor. Hospitals like to keep you in your room for a variety of safety reasons (like if a problem arises such as bleeding or syncope you will not be far away from the equipment they need to provide care). I can't see ehy you wouldn't be able to move about your room, that is if you are not getting pain meds.

 

Well, an awesome member here actually PMed me with a list of helpful links and has great connections to midwives and doulas nearby, so I'm thinking I probably will have an advocate, thumb.gif
 

     Quote:

Originally Posted by Mrs. MAT View Post

I found that moving around was the only thing that managed my pain.  The doctors wanted to monitor me and could only pick up the heartbeat when I was in a specific position in bed - the one that did not work well pain wise!  They did let me get out of bed to go to the bathroom, so I had to pee very often :-)  I do believe that moving around is an essential part of childbirth.  If I could do my first over again, I would choose a different hospital - their marketing material was great, but they really pushed meds, constant monitoring and being restricted to bed.  If I couldn't get a different hospital, I would get a doula.  I think it would be very helpful having someone with you who can point out what your options are instead of just following the providers preferred route (which may be easier on the provider but harder on you!).  To be honest, my doctor was ok with everything I wanted but wasn't the doctor on duty when I had my daughter. Regardless, it was really the nurses that were establishing the way things were going. 

This time around, I am going with a midwife at a different hospital :-)

As far as vetting the hospital, ask questions like "when do you feel a mom needs to be restricted to bed?"  "In what situations do you monitor the mom.  How is that done?"  "What is your policy on monitoring pain levels?  How is that done?"  (My hospital considered their requirement to monitor pain levels a mandate to push drugs every time they check on you).  "How many moms have drug-free childbirth? What techniques do you encourage them to use to manage the labor?"  (A lot of people consider natural = vaginal, and  will not give the right info if you just ask about natural childbirth).  Getting them to explain their policies might give you a clearer picture of how they really treat their patients.

Great questions! They'll help a lot for the director of Labor and Delivery. I was completely stuck on what I should ask, blush.gif So those help a lot, thanks. I'll just print-out ANOTHER sheet of questions, lol! My sheet of questions for the OB was a page and a half as is.

 

     Quote:

Originally Posted by fairyandgnome View Post

You have gotten a wealth of great info here..and I do 2nd Ina Mays book. But the one thing I try to make sure that every mother knows is that you DO have choices. Even in a hospital setting. I birthed my twins in a hospital after I risked out of the homebirthed I had planned. Not only did I walk around and up and down the halls, I got in the shower/tub after my water had already broken (it broke before I went in), I refused IV ports, I refused continued monitoring and I still had a natural, vaginal birth with one being a footling breech, AND I did it in my room. I refused the OR even though it was "hospital policy" That may be THEIR policy.. but this is YOUR birth! Your child! And as long as everything is okay with baby.. there is NO reason for them to invade and take over.  I can honestly tell you, the hospital staff were NOT happy. In fact. They were ticked off at me.. the head of staff even came and tried to get me to the OR.. but I had warned my Midwife and the OB a head of time.. I knew my rights and I was going to assert them if I needed too.

 

Don't get scared of what they tell you. Do your research, hire a doula who has done hers and will tell you, your options. And be strong. Have YOUR birth. :)

I will, :) I'm just.....so bad at asserting myself. blush.gif I've gotten better over the years, I think living with my fiance's parents has helped a lot, because his mom is a very.... confrontational woman. And I've eventually learned to just speak my mind. But she's just one person, and I do fear that I'd hunker down in the face of many people being just as confrontational. Honestly, if I can't find an advocate, I don't think I could do a hospital birth, but I'm not sure how well I could put my foot down and say, "You know what, no!"
 

post #58 of 86
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Julee View Post

It can be a huge deal! I had my son in a hospital too, but I made sure I was allowed to move around before I decided on the hospital I went to. I had a pretty long labor and the only thing that made me progress was walking all over the hospital with my doula. I had a lot of back labor, so when I couldn't walk very far anymore my doula suggested that I switch positions from my back to my knees. Once I did that the baby moved and the pain switched from my tailbone to my lower abdomen and soon I felt like I needed to push. I am sure that if I had not been allowed to move, I would have ended up with a c-section because I would not have progressed quickly enough.

 

By the way, my number one recommendation for all women who are pregnant is to get a doula! It doesn't matter what kind of birth you are planning on. It is so important to have someone with you who knows all about having a baby and how to help a mother with the pain and emotions of childbirth. Our doula also helped us communicate what we wanted to the hospital staff, so we didn't have to worry about anything other than having a baby. After I had my son, my husband and I both agreed we couldn't have done it without our doula!

I hear you all, and I agree. You all know what you're talking about anyway, :) I'll find one!

post #59 of 86

I am reading this post with interest because I just gave birth in a hospital setting 3 weeks ago.

 

With my first child I was very,very happy with the way the MW supported me in my birth plan and helped me avoid unnecessary interventions.  So, I decided to go with the same hospital the 2nd time.

But, with my 2nd birth I was very disappointed with the way the MW and dr apparently had not read my birth plan or taken it seriously, and the way one intervention led to another. I mean, we are not talking anything big here, but... I asked the MW to help me adjust the hospital bed so I could kneel or squat while pushing... the MW did not help me stating that the best position to give birth was laying down.  As DS was already coming out there was not a lot of time to argue.  So I had to push laying down.  I had also requested no shouting or forced pushing during the pushing stage but that request was also disregarded. With the MW and DR coaching me when to push, however I was in an uncomfortable position and felt that I really, really needed to slow down the birth by not pushing, to give my body time to stretch.  The whole pushing stage only lasted 10 min but for some reason the DR thought that was too long and I wasn't making progress fast enough and performed an episiotomy "to get DS out". 

 

Anyway what I am trying to say is that when you are in the middle of strong labour pains it can be very difficult to fight people in authority.  Also you are very much at the mercy of the actual nurse and dr at your birth, even though hospital policy may be that you can walk around, your dr will be able to discourage you from doing that because you will be too focused on giving birth to argue.  I think you have a good start by thinking about your birth plan and also what you will do if you are denied to carry it out, as pps have mentioned a good support person would also be a boon. (even better if this person has experience helping women birth in hospital settings!)

post #60 of 86
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by heatherr30 View Post

I am reading this post with interest because I just gave birth in a hospital setting 3 weeks ago.

 

With my first child I was very,very happy with the way the MW supported me in my birth plan and helped me avoid unnecessary interventions.  So, I decided to go with the same hospital the 2nd time.

But, with my 2nd birth I was very disappointed with the way the MW and dr apparently had not read my birth plan or taken it seriously, and the way one intervention led to another. I mean, we are not talking anything big here, but... I asked the MW to help me adjust the hospital bed so I could kneel or squat while pushing... the MW did not help me stating that the best position to give birth was laying down.  As DS was already coming out there was not a lot of time to argue.  So I had to push laying down.  I had also requested no shouting or forced pushing during the pushing stage but that request was also disregarded. With the MW and DR coaching me when to push, however I was in an uncomfortable position and felt that I really, really needed to slow down the birth by not pushing, to give my body time to stretch.  The whole pushing stage only lasted 10 min but for some reason the DR thought that was too long and I wasn't making progress fast enough and performed an episiotomy "to get DS out". 

 

Anyway what I am trying to say is that when you are in the middle of strong labour pains it can be very difficult to fight people in authority.  Also you are very much at the mercy of the actual nurse and dr at your birth, even though hospital policy may be that you can walk around, your dr will be able to discourage you from doing that because you will be too focused on giving birth to argue.  I think you have a good start by thinking about your birth plan and also what you will do if you are denied to carry it out, as pps have mentioned a good support person would also be a boon. (even better if this person has experience helping women birth in hospital settings!)

How terrible! If I might ask, what kind of midwife was this? One working for the hospital, or one that works outside of it and came to accompany you for delivery in the hospital?

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