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Nursing/Pre-nursing student mamas? - Page 5

post #81 of 122

My edit wont work :( That should say with Straighterline not the straighterline..

post #82 of 122

I'm doing ok. I passed chem with only a 2.3 through and am going to have to retake for entry into the RN program. I was pretty disappointed. I am in microbiology right now and LOVE it! I wish I were on a semester system though, I hate having all this info condensed into 8 weeks. I want more time to get deeper into the info. It's so interesting. Having a REALLY hard time with study time. My oldest dd is already watching my younger 3 kiddos 3x a week for my class, having her watch them even more would be too much. I am going to start getting up at 6 so I have *quiet* uninterrupted time. I don't know how people do this while working or with tiny babies. I am only going part time and feel overwhelmed.

post #83 of 122

I am currently in Summer 3 taking A&P2 lecture and lab... I took Statistics and Govt 1 during Summer 2 got A's in both, those two classes raised my gpa to a 3.7 (super excited) I will be done with pre-req's after this Fall and I apply to the program in Feb... I will take the TEAS V in December or January...

post #84 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by frolick16 View Post

the nursing job market is super competitive and super tight (can someone tell me where that mystical land is that GN's are able to get experience?)  it has been frustrating...I remain hopeful and patient (mostly) 


Indiana. All of the grads from the March class of 2011 at my school have jobs. And they've got ASNs. I hope that holds true for when I graduate! 

 

Right now, I'm gearing up to start clinicals this fall - that means two years until graduation. The vaxes and background checks and drug tests and CPR classes and supply-buying are A LOT to keep track of! 

 

post #85 of 122

At 9 tomorrow morning, I have an appointment to officially enroll in a BSN program! I'm totally terrified that I won't be able to hack it, plus I'm freaked out about managing work and school with a baby plus paying for books and supplies (we're dead broke right now). We'll make it work somehow.

 

Fingers crossed that all my credits transfer!

post #86 of 122

I took the NCLEX yesterday, the test stopped at 75!  Peliminary results say passed!  I have a feeling taking and passing the NCLEX will be easier than getting a job!  I have been forcing my step-father to approach the DON's of the hospitals he works at to land me interviews.  What I am finding out is that just because a position is advertised does not mean the hours actually exist.  By law facilities have to interview for jobs every so often...so, I am taking the EKG theory course, starting the accelerated BSN program in August, volunteering at a hospital and doing ACLS, and CPR in hopes of boosting my resume, poor, educated, and trying to keep the faith!  Best wishes to everyone and their journey, Frolick16, RN!

post #87 of 122

I'm glad to hear everyone out there is doing so well. Congrats especially to those of you who are in BSN programs! I wish I could afford that route but my state (WA Working Connections Child Care) won't pay for daycare assistance for anything at a University so there is no way I could afford a BSN program with two kids in daycare. However they will pay for one year of daycare so for the first year of my ASN-RN program I will not have to worry about that:) Are there any specific programs or ways to get daycare funding for single mom/student nurses?

I have my orientation on August 1 and will have to pay for daycare out of pocket that day, as well as a train ticket to go to the town since it's a few hours away from me. I plan on house hunting after the orientation while the kiddos are still in daycare. Has anyone else moved to go to nursing school?

I'm looking forward to getting to know more of you mamas better as I become a real nursing student in September! Is there anyone from WA on here?

Be love

post #88 of 122
I'd like to join in. smile.gif I can get free tuition at my dh's college, but I will not be attending there. I have 110 credit hours in pre-med and am a National Honors student. The nursing program here is terrible and the hours do not work for me. So I'm going to finish my B.A./B.S. through Oregon State and then do a Direct Entry program for my B.S.N. once we (hopefully!) move in a year or more. I hope to become a midwife eventually. I figure I can pace myself so that my older kids or mother can help out once I get to that point and that way I'm around when they're little more. Once we get tax returns next year, I hope to do my breastfeeding counselor certification and maybe work on becoming a doula in a couple of years.

I have a background working med/surg, ER/ psych, and skilled nursing as a CNA and EMT. I also was a phlebotomist and ART/Andrologist before we moved far away from my job and I decided to SAH. My qualifications are all expired, but I miss it every time I go to a hospital. In some ways, at least. wink1.gif I wanted to become a Neonatologist or a Midwife, but I have finally decided on Midwife. Eventually.
post #89 of 122

I'm a pre-nursing student :) I'm going for my BSN then hopefully working for a couple years can apprentice with a midwife or go back to school to get my Masters in nursing and work as a NP.  I want to work in L&D, but got to admit, the ER would fascinate me as well, but don't think I have the passion for that quite as well as I do for births.

post #90 of 122

I'm so glad to find this thread!  I've been on allnurses.com, but haven't found a group like you guys that have a lot of the same life situations as I do.

 

I'm about to start the second semester of my four semester ADN program.  My prerequisites are all done, I chipped away at them over a couple of years before applying to nursing school.  My kids are 7, 4 and 18 months.  They're mostly home with dh while I'm in school.  He works weekends and evenings. 

 

First semester was pretty challenging for me.   Not the classroom stuff, that was no problem, but clinicals pretty much kicked my butt.  I've never spent much time in hospitals or around sick people so it was hard emotionally for me to be there.  I hope it gets better this semester.  Plus I felt like my attentions were so split between being a student and being a mother.  I felt like I was just doing a mediocre job with each one. 

 

I do feel good about the learning I am doing, though, and the potential to have meaningful work eventually.  I'll probably get a job in med-surg or something similar after graduation (job outlook is still pretty good in this area) to get that experience but I'd like to eventually either go into public health or home health or go on to get my masters to become a NP or CNM.

 

Anyway, it's nice to meet you all!

post #91 of 122
Thread Starter 

Wow, this thread has been busy, busy, busy. Welcome everyone! Congrats to frolick on passing the NCLEX!

 

Neldavi, I'm wondering if you can share what was challenging about first semester clinicals? I'm starting in the fall, and honestly have absolutely no idea what to expect. No idea, at all. Hopefully they go over some of this stuff in orientation . . . .

 

As for me, I am done with A&P1, am never taking a summer course again (not with a teething one year old anyway), and have three weeks to catch my breath before heading back for Nursing 101 and A&P2. Phew.

 

Let's keep each other updated as the fall semester rolls out, I'm loving this thread.

 

 

post #92 of 122
aphel, clinicals were challenging for me mostly, I think, because I'm basically shy. Also, I've never done any kind of job in health care, have never spent much time in hospitals, have never spent much time with sick people, honestly. The most time I've spent in a hospital was after my second child's premature birth (my other two kids were born at home uneventfully) and successive stay in the ICU. It was traumatic all around. So, given this, most of my energy during clinicals was spent just adjusting to my environment and getting comfortable with just walking into people's rooms and talking to them, caring for them. Obviously, this will just come naturally to a lot of people, and did to many in my class. This was just my experience, and I honestly think it will get easier for me the more time I spend in the hospital.
post #93 of 122

Hello everyone,

It is so nice to find this thread!  This last spring, I just finished my last pre-requisite for the community colleges around here, and I am looking at starting actual nursing school in January.  I started on this pathway because my husband was diagnosed with a permanent disability a little over two years ago.  It is amusing to me that if anyone had told me right away I would be going into nursing, I would have laughed at them! I have had too many bad experiences with the current medical point-of-view that I never would have considered entering the field myself.  However, once it became clear that my husband could not longer be our "breadwinner," then I obviously had to look for something more permanent than the temporary jobs I had been considering.  One of the obvious possibilities was to become a lactation consultant.  I have breastfed all six of my babies for almost three years, and at one point almost became a LLL leader.  I have a passion to help women get a good start with breastfeeding, and am appalled at all the bad advice I have heard given (even from lactation consultants!) that have led to the end of a breastfeeding relationship, or at the very least caused a great deal of unnecessary suffering for mother and/or baby until it was resolved.  However, when looking into the requirements and possible jobs, I found that I couldn't really make a good living as an LC that would support my family unless I was first a nurse.  So I looked into what that would require, prayed a lot, and found my way to where I am now! I am even really looking forward to all that is ahead, and actually expect to end up as a CNM.  I still intend to get my LC license no matter what else I do. 

After all I have learned being a mother for the past 11+ years, homeschooling, and trying to run a house as a sahm, I found that  I have become a good student myself and have done very well in the pre-reqs. I do have a previous bachelor's degree, but in something so entirely unrelated that I almost had to start from scratch with the pre-reqs. Nevertheless, here I am on the other side of them, and done well enough to have a good assurance of getting into the January program, which is a relief.  Another blessing has been that the timing has all worked out very well so that our newest LO is due September, but I have no classes I have had to take for this summer or this fall.  I have been able to stay home, enjoy my kids, and prepare for baby this summer, and I will get an entire semester with baby before starting school at the end of January.  The hardest part of all of this has been giving up being a sahm.  I loved being home with my children.  It has taken a great deal of faith and trust in God's goodness and love for all of us.  But He certainly has provided in everything we have needed during this time. My family lives nearby and has done a GREAT deal to make it all possible, too, since my husband's disabilities have limited his ability to help and support in some ways.

 

One of my biggest concerns right now, however, is continuing the breastfeeding of this LO once I start school. I do intend to read through and ask questions on the breastfeeding forums, but  wondered if any of you might have some good pointers, advice, "heads up", etc. that might help make the process smoother for me, or at least give me a better idea of the challenges.  When I first returned to school, my last ds was only 5 months, but I was taking online classes, so it didn't interfere with our closeness and nursing.  By the time I had to take onsite classes, he was 9 months old and it was only two days a week that I was away from him, so nursing was very well established and has continued strongly since then.  But with my new baby, I will start right away being gone, and clinicals will start soon after, when he is only 5 months old.  I have a heck of a time pumping enough milk anyway, even with a pretty decent pump.  This time around I have purchased a bra that will hold the suctions in place while keeping my hands free, which will hopefully help me relax better, and I am planning on getting a medela freestyle because they look like they are very portable and might be more easily used during brief times during clinicals.  Has anyone here successfully pumped while doing their clinicals? Anyone pumped through nursing school at all? How did you manage it?

 

Thanks!!!

M.

post #94 of 122

Mommajam, I haven't done it yet, but DD will be six months old when I start nursing school in October, so I will be pumping for her. I have an AAS is medical assisting, so I'll be jumping straight into lab and clinical classes, so I'm nervous about how I'm going to work pumping into my time. Thankfully, DD will be able to start solids, which will help out.

post #95 of 122

Right now I am a SAHM and have been since May when my son was eight months old. Between four and eight months I was in a CNA course and worked part time. Pumping in a school is rough because they do not have to provide an area to pump to students, only for employees. I was told to pump in the bathroom:( It was lame. We had eight hour clinicals four days a week for four weeks at a LTC facility (the program had us do double the required hours for everything!) Pumping in the bathroom at the LTC was horrible and I hope I never have to do that again. I was told I could pump in the employee lounge but it was always full of about half a dozen employees both male and female so I didn't feel like doing that. I would make sure to discuss these things in advance if I were you , I regret not doing so myself. Another much better option is getting an adapter for your car and pumping in your car, if I had a car this would have been my first choice after pumping in the bathroom one time. I'm not trying to scare you, I just wanted to share my own experience pumping while at a clinical site. I start an RN program in September and hope I can have a better situation for pumping. Since my son will be one I will probably just use the PIS at home and take a hand pump to school for my own comfort.

 

Also I have my program orientation tomorrow. I have not yet moved to the town I will be going to school in so me and my two kids are going to have to take a train, I think it will take us around five hours on buses and trains to get there. I have the highest grades of the incoming class (4.0 pre and co reqs and 3.8 overall) so I really want to make a good impression. I will have about one hour to run my kids (literally I'm brining the jogging stroller) to an off campus daycare and get to the orientation. Any suggestions for looking professional and non frumpy after a morning on the train with kids? I was planning on wearing an enwrapture vantage dress since I've been living in them all summer and it would be comfortable but I'm afraid I would not look professional enough. Maybe I'll bring something to change into. Oh my I can't believe I'm this nervous about going to orientation and making a good first impression:)

post #96 of 122

Update!  I just accepted a position on a GI/GU floor.  As it usually is in nursing when your the new Rn the hours available are the less desirable.  I will be doing 3 12 hour shifts on night.  I am so glad to have a job at a great hospital, one of the few still working in black, great opportunities will come from me being an employee there.  They offer great benefits, pay, and tuition reimbursement.  I would love to hear stories of how others made these hours work in their lives.  I am a single mama.  I have four kiddos, one is 18 and the youngest is 1.  The kids go to their dad's every other week with the exception of the 1 year old, she is with me 24/7.  The 18 year old comes and goes as he pleases, choosing to stay mostly with me at this point.  Please share your stories of how this worked for you!

 

post #97 of 122

I called my school today and switched to the ASN program. The CNM program I want to go to has an ASN-MSN bridge program, so it makes more sense to spend that in-between year working as an RN instead of finishing my BSN. Plus I have one year left on my GI Bill, so this way I only have to come up with one semester's tuition instead of four. It drives me crazy that I'm getting a THIRD associate's degree instead of a bachelor's, but if I get a good medical assisting job that offers a nursing school tuition program, I'll go ahead and switch back to the BSN program. So I should graduate after the Fall 2012 semester.

post #98 of 122

I just got a job!!!!!! after 5 mos of searching and who knows how many applications, I was hired by a children's hospital as part of their new grad program. I am going to train as a PICU nurse! So thrilled and relieved that finally I can practice my passion. 

 

Advice for job searching-- apply every single day, make it a job until you get a job. Try correctional institutes, nursing homes, and home health care, as these are often new grad friendly. If you don't get a call from a new grad job you applied for, call and make an appt with HR and find out what you may have been lacking in your resume that others had, so you can maybe draw on other experiences you didn't think of before. 

post #99 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by USAmma View Post

I just got a job!!!!!! after 5 mos of searching and who knows how many applications, I was hired by a children's hospital as part of their new grad program. I am going to train as a PICU nurse! So thrilled and relieved that finally I can practice my passion. 

 

Advice for job searching-- apply every single day, make it a job until you get a job. Try correctional institutes, nursing homes, and home health care, as these are often new grad friendly. If you don't get a call from a new grad job you applied for, call and make an appt with HR and find out what you may have been lacking in your resume that others had, so you can maybe draw on other experiences you didn't think of before. 


Congrats!! And thanks for the advice!  I had been wondering about the job market myself :)  Did you do your capstone in pediatrics?  I have been humming and hawing over whether to pick a capstone that I know I WANT to do, vs picking one that is practical (like Picking OB vs MedSug)

 

AFM:  I took my LPN NCLEX this summer, and will be doing some PRN/part time stuff this Fall.  I'm starting my Senior year in my BSN program and will be graduating next June.  I am so happy that I am finally on the downhill slope of this climb!! 

 

Good luck to everyone else out there working away!

 

post #100 of 122
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by minkajane View Post

I called my school today and switched to the ASN program. The CNM program I want to go to has an ASN-MSN bridge program, so it makes more sense to spend that in-between year working as an RN instead of finishing my BSN. Plus I have one year left on my GI Bill, so this way I only have to come up with one semester's tuition instead of four. It drives me crazy that I'm getting a THIRD associate's degree instead of a bachelor's, but if I get a good medical assisting job that offers a nursing school tuition program, I'll go ahead and switch back to the BSN program. So I should graduate after the Fall 2012 semester.



Is this Frontier? I've looked into it a bit, as I really love the idea of bridging directly from the ASN, but I really do not love the idea of distance learning. Also, I'm wondering how well a degree from there really works out? Is it as reputable as everyone says it is, or would a degree from an on-site program be better? Just curious if anyone has any thoughts/experiences. Perhaps I'll poke my head into the midwifery sub forum . . . .

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by USAmma View Post

I just got a job!!!!!! after 5 mos of searching and who knows how many applications, I was hired by a children's hospital as part of their new grad program. I am going to train as a PICU nurse! So thrilled and relieved that finally I can practice my passion. 

 

Advice for job searching-- apply every single day, make it a job until you get a job. Try correctional institutes, nursing homes, and home health care, as these are often new grad friendly. If you don't get a call from a new grad job you applied for, call and make an appt with HR and find out what you may have been lacking in your resume that others had, so you can maybe draw on other experiences you didn't think of before. 



 

CONGRATULATIONS!!!!!!!!! PICU sounds intense. Please please keep us posted, I'm super interested to hear all about it!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by frolick16 View Post

Update!  I just accepted a position on a GI/GU floor.  As it usually is in nursing when your the new Rn the hours available are the less desirable.  I will be doing 3 12 hour shifts on night.  I am so glad to have a job at a great hospital, one of the few still working in black, great opportunities will come from me being an employee there.  They offer great benefits, pay, and tuition reimbursement.  I would love to hear stories of how others made these hours work in their lives.  I am a single mama.  I have four kiddos, one is 18 and the youngest is 1.  The kids go to their dad's every other week with the exception of the 1 year old, she is with me 24/7.  The 18 year old comes and goes as he pleases, choosing to stay mostly with me at this point.  Please share your stories of how this worked for you!

 


And CONGRATS!!!!! Am I a weirdo for thinking night shifts rock? I'm kind of hoping for the overnights. And you certainly can't knock working only three shifts a week, even if they are twelve hours. No advice on the kiddos, sorry, but more people will hopefully chime in.

 

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