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Woudl you let your toddler wear footie pajamas to Target? - Page 7

post #121 of 190

Ahh, ok, this is a very interesting point.  I read the OP differently.  I would let my kids go out in pajamas, but not wearing shoes isn't an option.  I just assumed OP put shoes on over the pajama feet.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post

You can keep your yard safe, but once you venture onto public property the risk of glass, nails, other items that are exceedingly unpleasant to step on increases exponentially. It's not so much that I want him to wear shoes, as it is I want him to not have to go to the hospital and get stitches and a tetanus shot.
 

 



 

post #122 of 190

I guess the shoe thing is cultural. I've lived in Europe and Asia before, and walking barefoot was always acceptable, and no one seemed to be worried about germs, nails or glass. I understand that some people are worried about these things, but to me it does not really make sense from my experience.

post #123 of 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxravnos View Post

Re: shoes i think the reason everyone wanted their kids to wear shoes is for maybe safety reasons and the mistaken impression that you have to be wearing shoes in a store.


Around here, you DO need to be wearing shoes in a store. There are signs everywhere (at the entrance to most businesses) that say "No shirt/No shoes/No service"... Obviously babies that aren't walking don't need shoes (although I heard of one family being kicked out of McD's because the baby was barefoot!) but anyone who walks, needs shoes to enter a public business. It is not at all unusual for there to be broken glass, sticky spills, etc. so I don't really see how you could NOT wear shoes around here (plus it's cold!)... And the thought of going into a public restroom without shoes would REALLY gross me out...

So, I guess I would let DS wear footie PJ's with shoes (though that does NOT sound comfy!), but I can't imagine this ever happening with him -- he doesn't even own footie PJ's (he hates them) and he's never gotten all that upset about needing to wear regular clothes when we go out.
Edited by crunchy_mommy - 3/1/11 at 6:45am
post #124 of 190
My 2-year-old is a young enough 2-year-old that I usually just carry her if she is wearing footie pjs. But if I think she's going to need to walk, I put her boots on over the pjs. (It's still winter so boots here.)
post #125 of 190
Thread Starter 
Yeah, if she had ended up wearing the footies I would have made her wear shoes. She will sit in the cart for a little while, but then usually gives up that idea and want's to help push. eyesroll.gif I wouldn't let her wear just socks in the parking lot, so I can't imagine letting her walk around in footies. It's not uncommon to see a broken beer bottle or puddles of who knows what when it hasn't been raining in the parking lot and I would not want her walking on those things. Carrying her isn't an option with the 6 month old already in the Beco.
post #126 of 190

No

post #127 of 190

absolutely. i couldnt really imagine why i wouldnt. I would have had them wear shoes. 

 

in fact, i think my now almost 3 year old went everywhere in a new pair of pajamas over the summer. 

 

i have a picture of her at the beach in pjs and rain boots and at the mall in the same pjs. 

 

i wear yoga pants that look like pjs everywhere. why not?

post #128 of 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by belltree View Post

I guess the shoe thing is cultural. I've lived in Europe and Asia before, and walking barefoot was always acceptable, and no one seemed to be worried about germs, nails or glass. I understand that some people are worried about these things, but to me it does not really make sense from my experience.


My experience tells me it makes perfect sense. But then again, I do have a scar on the bottom of my foot to remind me that it makes sense.

 

post #129 of 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post

My experience tells me it makes perfect sense. But then again, I do have a scar on the bottom of my foot to remind me that it makes sense.

 

 

Let me elaborate. I went most summers barefoot to school, as did several of my classmates. A handful went to school barefoot in the winter. All of us had shoes and chose not to wear them. I did cut and burnt myself here and there, but that was just part of life for me. I walked around barefoot during college, and in the woods, and through cities. It is not all that bad. Walking barefoot is wonderful, I can feel the ground, it feels good for my back. I would not want to miss any of this. Honestly, I just don't really care for shoes in general.

 

I can see, that there are some instances, where shoes have an important protective function (working in a chemical lab, working on a construction site, working on a ship). I don't buy the germs argument, nor the dirt, dirt is everywhere plus I can and do wash my feet once I get home, and so many people were flipflops, or other thin soled shoes that are not really protective.

 

As I said, I grew up differently and learned to evaluate some of the daily "dangers" differently. Now that I have a child in a different culture, I am learning more rules as the no barefoot rule or the no running in buildings rule and many more.

post #130 of 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by belltree View Post



 

Let me elaborate. I went most summers barefoot to school, as did several of my classmates. A handful went to school barefoot in the winter. All of us had shoes and chose not to wear them. I did cut and burnt myself here and there, but that was just part of life for me. I walked around barefoot during college, and in the woods, and through cities. It is not all that bad. Walking barefoot is wonderful, I can feel the ground, it feels good for my back. I would not want to miss any of this. Honestly, I just don't really care for shoes in general.

 

I can see, that there are some instances, where shoes have an important protective function (working in a chemical lab, working on a construction site, working on a ship). I don't buy the germs argument, nor the dirt, dirt is everywhere plus I can and do wash my feet once I get home, and so many people were flipflops, or other thin soled shoes that are not really protective.

 

As I said, I grew up differently and learned to evaluate some of the daily "dangers" differently. Now that I have a child in a different culture, I am learning more rules as the no barefoot rule or the no running in buildings rule and many more.


Well I don't know about where you are, but here walking barefoot really is dangerous. Its more than just cuts a burns. It's nails through the foot, glass through the foot, I even came across a steak knife on the ground once. It's the suburbs, and while I hate to generalize, the people around here seem to be of the opinion that if they smash a bottle on the ground no one will be mad and someone else will clean it up for them. There were kids in the neighbourhood a while back who berried metal skewers in the road allowance, point up. Plenty of people worked to try and find them all, but we just don't know.

 

post #131 of 190

removing


Edited by marispel - 3/3/11 at 6:50pm
post #132 of 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by marispel View Post

No, I wouldn't let my DS wear footed jammies to Target.  In fact, the other day his DC had a jammies day and when I picked him up I needed to go to the grocery store but held off until the next day because I didn't want to take him to the store in his jammies.

 

Personally, I think it's inappropriate.  It just seems like our society is getting too relaxed in how we present ourselves to others.  Like we just don't care anymore.    I remember when we used to dress up to go to the bank, to church, even ride an airplane....but now, girls are wearing short-shorts, guys are wearing jeans dragging around their knees and nobody cares.  

 

I will teach my DS manners, respect for their elders and dressing appropriately.   He will be raised to say Yes sir and no Mam.   He will say please and thank you and he will get out of his PJs if he wants to leave the house.  He'll brush his hair and his teeth and be a respectable young boy for as long as I can have any say about it.

 

BTW - when I see older kids in the store wearing their PJs and slippers I think their parents have no control over their kids.  They look lazy, they look sloppy and they look like they don't care.    When I see toddlers in their PJs I think the toddler is either sick or the parents are too lazy to change them.

 


Yowie zowie. I think its safe to say that you live in a different universe than I do. But then I am a teacher who asked to be called by first name as a show of respect for my students.

But lazy? Really? How is it any less difficult to wear jammies than jeans?
post #133 of 190


Well this just further enforces why it is SO not worth worrying about what other people think! 

So a child wearing jammies mean the parents are lazy, have no control of their kids and the children themselves are are ill-mannered hooligans? I think my eyeballs slipped right to the back of my skull. rolleyes.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by marispel View Post

No, I wouldn't let my DS wear footed jammies to Target.  In fact, the other day his DC had a jammies day and when I picked him up I needed to go to the grocery store but held off until the next day because I didn't want to take him to the store in his jammies.

 

Personally, I think it's inappropriate.  It just seems like our society is getting too relaxed in how we present ourselves to others.  Like we just don't care anymore.    I remember when we used to dress up to go to the bank, to church, even ride an airplane....but now, girls are wearing short-shorts, guys are wearing jeans dragging around their knees and nobody cares.  

 

I will teach my DS manners, respect for their elders and dressing appropriately.   He will be raised to say Yes sir and no Mam.   He will say please and thank you and he will get out of his PJs if he wants to leave the house.  He'll brush his hair and his teeth and be a respectable young boy for as long as I can have any say about it.

 

BTW - when I see older kids in the store wearing their PJs and slippers I think their parents have no control over their kids.  They look lazy, they look sloppy and they look like they don't care.    When I see toddlers in their PJs I think the toddler is either sick or the parents are too lazy to change them.

 



 

post #134 of 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by HollyBearsMom View Post


Well this just further enforces why it is SO not worth worrying about what other people think! 

So a child wearing jammies mean the parents are lazy, have no control of their kids and the children themselves are are ill-mannered hooligans? I think my eyeballs slipped right to the back of my skull. rolleyes.gif



 

 

My children must be horrible to be around, despite everyone else saying otherwise.
 

 

post #135 of 190

Maybe our kids can hang out together and terrorize the neighborhood.  It will nice to for them to have some pals in juvie. orngbiggrin.gif AH, If I only knew it was the PJ's that were root all evil.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post



 

My children must be horrible to be around, despite everyone else saying otherwise.
 

 



 

post #136 of 190

Depends on how much she wanted to wear them. Generally I dislike footie pajamas so we don't use them. Add to that the fact that we feel pretty stronglyy that pajamas are only for sleeping in and the answer would be, no. You want to wear your pajamas? Guess you're ready to go to bed then! This is mainly because pajamas aren't made for lots of wear like day time clothes are; they're meant to be nice and comfortable to sleep in. I've never really understood the trend in the US in the last 10 years to wear pajamas everywhere.

post #137 of 190

My DS doesn't have PJs. All of his clothes are soft and comfortable, and he has a few outfits, mostly in sizes that don't fit him anymore, of clothes that might be considered PJs, including footed bodysuits. The bodysuits are/were used in the winter under clothes for extra warmth and the added benefit of socks that can't be pulled off, and the added difficulty of pulling his own diaper off and running around naked.

 

But he doesn't have clothes that are strictly for sleeping in. Whatever he wears in the daytime stays on until it gets dirty or smelly, which is (still) usually a couple of times per day.  

 

The only time we change his clothes for sleeping in for the night is if he is wearing dress clothes, and that is only because I don't want them to get messed up. 

 

I wouldn't buy footie pajamas with the plastic foot thing. I just don't like them. They seem gross to me. Same goes for flame retardant clothing. 

post #138 of 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by marispel View Post

No, I wouldn't let my DS wear footed jammies to Target.  In fact, the other day his DC had a jammies day and when I picked him up I needed to go to the grocery store but held off until the next day because I didn't want to take him to the store in his jammies.

 

Personally, I think it's inappropriate.  It just seems like our society is getting too relaxed in how we present ourselves to others.  Like we just don't care anymore.    I remember when we used to dress up to go to the bank, to church, even ride an airplane....but now, girls are wearing short-shorts, guys are wearing jeans dragging around their knees and nobody cares.  

 

I will teach my DS manners, respect for their elders and dressing appropriately.   He will be raised to say Yes sir and no Mam.   He will say please and thank you and he will get out of his PJs if he wants to leave the house.  He'll brush his hair and his teeth and be a respectable young boy for as long as I can have any say about it.

 

BTW - when I see older kids in the store wearing their PJs and slippers I think their parents have no control over their kids.  They look lazy, they look sloppy and they look like they don't care.    When I see toddlers in their PJs I think the toddler is either sick or the parents are too lazy to change them.

 



I have read and reread this post about 5 times. Are you serious? Really and truly?

I'm not joking when I say that my mother might've said this exact thing to me 20 years ago when it was pajama day at school (and I wasn't allowed to wear mine).

I, for one, am glad that most people I have come in contact with throughout the country do not share this opinion! It's antiquated for sure.

I am thrilled that society has started basing their opinions of people off of their character and not their ability to play dress up.


My mother is always put together and dressed impeccably- she is also a monster. I fail to see your point. My child may be in pajamas, but I am certainly not lazy. what a random thing to even say!

Trust me, respecting my child and honoring their voice is anything but lazy.
post #139 of 190

1


Edited by GFNDMom42 - 3/4/11 at 2:36pm
post #140 of 190

I buy footie jammies ON PURPOSE for outside wear. Why? Because I wear my DS almost everywhere still, and if he has on a shirt/pants combo, the clothes get all bunched up and I know that it would make ME uncomfortable to have my shirt up around my chest, and my pants hiked up to my knees.

 

Also, they are cute.

 

And just for the record, I wont be fighting any clothing battles with my DS as he gets older. He can wear a dress to Target (or anywhere else) if thats what he chooses. Its his body, he can wear what he likes.

 

I will say I am pretty shocked at some of the more negative and judging comments. Really? This is really something to judge another mom on as a person and a parent? If you find yourself judging someone over a child wearing jammies, I think you have way bigger problems to address.

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