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resturant serving breastmilk icecream UPDATE it's been confiscated!

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-12569011

 

I wonder how popular it will be. My first thought was is it really organic, wouldn't the women have to have completely organic diets for them to be able to claim that? I don't know anyone who has a 100% organic diet.

 

I don't know if I'd try it though, I've tasted my own milk many times but it would still feel a bit odd to try someone elses. I've also donated milk to a hospital milk bank which seems a better use than making icecream.

post #2 of 32

I don't know.  It saddens me that this milk is going to an ice cream parlor rather than a milk bank.  Money talks, I suppose.

post #3 of 32
I also see it as something of a waste. It seems to turn breastmilk into a novelty item. I'm not sure I would try it, because I also think breastmilk is better reserved for babies. Maybe time will tell, we will see what the response is to their business and whether it does help people become more open to breastfeeding.

At least they pasteurize it and have screened their donors. They are looking out for health concerns.
post #4 of 32

I read the article and while I had to laugh a little, I also see it as an opportunity for society to "normalize" breastmilk instead of seeing it as a toxic substance for anyone over 1yo. 

 

I read an article once on public attitudes toward breastmilk in Mongolia, and not only was it widely accepted by young and old, it was revered and was drunk by adults.  Wouldn't it be interesting if that were the case world wide?

post #5 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellp View Post

I read the article and while I had to laugh a little, I also see it as an opportunity for society to "normalize" breastmilk instead of seeing it as a toxic substance for anyone over 1yo. 

 

I read an article once on public attitudes toward breastmilk in Mongolia, and not only was it widely accepted by young and old, it was revered and was drunk by adults.  Wouldn't it be interesting if that were the case world wide?



I read that article too. It was very interesting.

What a complete difference from our country where so many people think it is "disgusting".

 

I don't think anyone sees breastmilk as a toxic substance anywhere. I just think the attitude in this country is that breasts are for men to fondle and suck and people can't seperate that from what their primary function is. They are stuck with a perverted feeling about it.

 

post #6 of 32

I agree that its a waste of a precious resource.

post #7 of 32

It's just an awareness thing (and a good one too, the story is everywhere). I doubt it will be a regular addition to their menu. Even if it is, and some women want to sell their breastmilk to make ice cream, so what? It's not sacred. It's food. Making it into ice cream just highlights that fact. They were paid pretty well for their milk, too, btw (or she was, I think there was only one woman involved). I'd have done it. 

post #8 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rani View Post

I agree that its a waste of a precious resource.



But if everyone who could breastfeed, did breastfeed, there would be a huge surplus of milk. 

post #9 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by swede View Post





But if everyone who could breastfeed, did breastfeed, there would be a huge surplus of milk. 



That might be true, but none for me thanks!

It's for babies. They need it. Their umbilical cord is gone and that's why we have the food right away for them when they come out.

Adults can grow, find, pick, or kill their food and have the digestive systems for it.

I wouldnt pump milk out of my body for anyone but a baby who needed it.

post #10 of 32

Yeah, I find the waste aspect disconcerting too. I don't think breastmilk is just for babies (or toddlers!); apparently cancer patients benefit from it immensely. I believe during the Renaissance breastmilk was fed quite often to the sick and elderly. And that's pretty cool. But ice cream? Yeah, no. Also, from a Traditional Foods perspective, pasteurising it seems faintly heretical. :p

post #11 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokering View Post

Yeah, I find the waste aspect disconcerting too. I don't think breastmilk is just for babies (or toddlers!); apparently cancer patients benefit from it immensely. I believe during the Renaissance breastmilk was fed quite often to the sick and elderly. And that's pretty cool. But ice cream? Yeah, no. Also, from a Traditional Foods perspective, pasteurising it seems faintly heretical. :p

But as long as 'her' baby is getting what she needs, then any surplus being used for 'any'thing can't be called 'wasteful'.I wouldn't eat it, but I don't think its wierd. 
 

post #12 of 32

 

Quote:
But as long as 'her' baby is getting what she needs, then any surplus being used for 'any'thing can't be called 'wasteful'.

I think it can, when there are literally millions of babies out there in need of it, and thousands of other ways adults can get their nutrition. Yes, it's not as wasteful as tipping it down the drain, but given the preciousness and - oddly enough - scarcity of the resource, it could be put to far, far better uses. It's like... if the blood bank desperately needs AB-negative blood, and someone with that blood type decides to siphon off a pint of his own blood every few weeks and make it into black pudding for a vampire-themed restaurant. Sure, it's his blood, so arguably he doesn't have to give it to anyone; but it seems like a frivolous thing to do with it when people are literally dying of the lack of it, and cow's blood is readily available for black pudding-making.

 

OK, that was a gross analogy.

post #13 of 32

I'm not sure the state of milk banks in England, where the ice cream is being served, but here in Canada, there is one. Yes, ONE bank. For the entire country. And there's a great deal of red tape to wade through before you can donate. I guess if the infrastructure is there to donate, and the desire to use donated milk is high then I can see it being viewed as wasteful. Otherwise, no.

post #14 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaughingHyena View Post

I wonder how popular it will be. .


There was a blurb in my local paper today that said it had already sold out. Here's a similar article that says the same- http://news.discovery.com/human/breast-milk-ice-cream-110225.html
post #15 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie Mac View Post

I'm not sure the state of milk banks in England, where the ice cream is being served, but here in Canada, there is one. Yes, ONE bank. For the entire country. And there's a great deal of red tape to wade through before you can donate. I guess if the infrastructure is there to donate, and the desire to use donated milk is high then I can see it being viewed as wasteful. Otherwise, no.


Yes, in some places, the donor has to pay to ship the milk!  I don't think the blood analogy works.  There is no substitute for blood.  Babies can survive without breastmilk.  And when you say "better uses" (smokering), how many of those babies have mothers who truly couldn't produce milk for them?

post #16 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by swede View Post




Yes, in some places, the donor has to pay to ship the milk!  I don't think the blood analogy works.  There is no substitute for blood.  Babies can survive without breastmilk.  And when you say "better uses" (smokering), how many of those babies have mothers who truly couldn't produce milk for them?


A lot of those babies are adopted, or parented by gay or single men, or by mothers who are ill and unable to safely breastfeed (as in taking hardcore drugs for their illness). I truly couldn't produce milk when DS was little, and neither could DH. Thankfully for us, babymoma was more than willing so we didn't even have to think about finding another donor.

post #17 of 32

I was thinking if breastfeeding moms could use something like this to supplement their income maybe more moms could make breastfeeding work. The ice cream is very expensive and the mom got about $24 (15 pounds) for 10 ounces of breast milk.

post #18 of 32

Is it vegan?

post #19 of 32

 

Quote:
And when you say "better uses" (smokering), how many of those babies have mothers who truly couldn't produce milk for them?

Is that the point? Even if a mother could breastfeed but chooses not to for the most frivolous or silly reason, it's still better for the baby to be fed donated breastmilk than formula. So it's still a far better use than making ice cream out of it. Yes, ideally babies should get breastmilk from their own mothers, but it's not their fault if their mothers won't do it, even if they can. Like bone marrow donation - ideally a relative will do it, but if someone's dying, who'd say "Well, your mother and sister were both matches, but they refused, so I'll make bone marrow soup out of mine instead!"? (OK, another gross analogy. I'm on a roll today...) In other words: the mothers might not "need" it, but the babies definitely do.

 

I do agree that the infrastructure of milk banks is a problem, but there are plenty of people who arrange donation privately. It can be done.

 

Eavesdrop: I believe the theory goes that breastmilk is indeed vegan, because it's freely given. Don't know about the ice cream itself, though - does it have egg yolks in it? Breastmilk isn't that creamy, so I imagine they'd have to use egg yolks or cream to make up the richness... unless they just used hindmilk, or even separated the cream from the breastmilk? Fascinating thought....

post #20 of 32
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
I'm not sure the state of milk banks in England, where the ice cream is being served, but here in Canada, there is one. Yes, ONE bank. For the entire country. And there's a great deal of red tape to wade through before you can donate. I guess if the infrastructure is there to donate, and the desire to use donated milk is high then I can see it being viewed as wasteful. Otherwise, no.

I'm not sure how many milk banks there are, the one I donated to was about an hour away. They had a midwife who lived locally to me who collected the milk and took it in, I was to far away for there general collection round to cover me. They supplied sterile bottles and I rang them when I had run out of freezer space. From what they said most people who were offered donor milk for their LOs took it but they were only able to offer it to the sickest babies with the limited supplies. I remember them saying that 1oz was all these tiny babies needed for a day, that was what kept me doing it as I was never able to pump very much.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › Activism and News › resturant serving breastmilk icecream UPDATE it's been confiscated!