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How do you accurately gauge development in possibly 'gifted' kids? - Page 2

post #21 of 31

Everything you mentioned is within range of a D+Magnesium deficiency.

 

The Vitamin D Council has a lot of info about all sorts of symptoms of deficiency. This is their sitemap. So, so many health and wellness issues are related to D3 deficiency, so at the very least, I would deal with that for a few months and then re-evaluate with the remaining symptoms, if there are any. The restorative and maintenance dose of D3 (in oil drops or oil capsules) is 1,000IU/25lbs of body weight for the average person, but chronic conditions and acute deficiency may require much more to reach an optimal level of D3- and be symptom-free. 

post #22 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PreggieUBA2C View Post

Everything you mentioned is within range of a D+Magnesium deficiency.

 

The Vitamin D Council has a lot of info about all sorts of symptoms of deficiency. This is their sitemap. So, so many health and wellness issues are related to D3 deficiency, so at the very least, I would deal with that for a few months and then re-evaluate with the remaining symptoms, if there are any. The restorative and maintenance dose of D3 (in oil drops or oil capsules) is 1,000IU/25lbs of body weight for the average person, but chronic conditions and acute deficiency may require much more to reach an optimal level of D3- and be symptom-free. 


That is really interesting. *I* have deficiencies specifically in both of those and still not sure if my levels are back to normal. I did start giving DS occasional vitamins when I found out I had the deficiencies (thinking perhaps my milk was deficient as well)... I suppose he could still not be getting enough, as he takes "maintenance" levels and theoretically could have been deficient even before birth??? I hate hate hate supplementing but in this case it might be a good step for us to take...
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by crunchy_mommy View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by PreggieUBA2C View Post

Everything you mentioned is within range of a D+Magnesium deficiency.

 

The Vitamin D Council has a lot of info about all sorts of symptoms of deficiency. This is their sitemap. So, so many health and wellness issues are related to D3 deficiency, so at the very least, I would deal with that for a few months and then re-evaluate with the remaining symptoms, if there are any. The restorative and maintenance dose of D3 (in oil drops or oil capsules) is 1,000IU/25lbs of body weight for the average person, but chronic conditions and acute deficiency may require much more to reach an optimal level of D3- and be symptom-free. 




That is really interesting. *I* have deficiencies specifically in both of those and still not sure if my levels are back to normal. I did start giving DS occasional vitamins when I found out I had the deficiencies (thinking perhaps my milk was deficient as well)... I suppose he could still not be getting enough, as he takes "maintenance" levels and theoretically could have been deficient even before birth??? I hate hate hate supplementing but in this case it might be a good step for us to take...


I really know what you what you mean about supplementing. I hate it too. I've put so much effort into providing a traditional diet, which then evolved into a paleo diet at the end of last year, but it is clear that until and unless our geographical location changes to somewhere closer than the 34th parallel, D3 is going to be on the list. Magnesium, too, at least until the D3 is replete and we can re-evaluate with our diet.

 

It's so frustrating. But even moreso, was the discovery that so many of my family's "issues" have been D3 deficiency, so I jump at the chance to alert others. Sensory stuff for me is related to hypothyroid, which is related to my D3 deficiency. I am completely off of thyroid now, and was able to stop after only one week of D3. I have been hypothyroid my whole life. So. Annoying. I have to take 20,000IU right now, and my dc are on double-dose for the next month until our next test. My dp has had a lot fewer ADHD challenges since he started taking D3, too.

 

Overall, it just makes sense: we evolved in the bright, warm sunlight and our bodies are photosenstive as a result, so we still need the sun, even if we've been clever enough to figure out how to survive without much of it. Without it, myriad functions are impaired, not just ones we can track, no doubt. Supplementing seems unsustainable, really, but it's what we do for now.

 

I hope you have much, much success with the D3. It would be so wonderful to alleviate symptoms of unwellness so simply.

 

post #24 of 31
Thread Starter 
So our doctor thinks that DS is totally on-track and the things we are worried about are more likely related to him being so smart(!) He had kind of an interesting perspective on it all... that he knows when he doesn't know something... that he's distressed by loud noises because he doesn't understand them (makes sense, because now that I think of it, when he DOES understand the mechanics of a loud noise -- i.e. how the vacuum works, how water flows through the pipes in the heater, etc. -- he stops being afraid)... that he's a little behind socially because he's so focused on other mental/physical things... He doesn't think the growth plateau is a problem, and I guess according to his measurements he has grown a couple inches (no weight gain though) so maybe my numbers were off... he was also impressed with how much more social DS is now than last time we saw him (which was only a few months ago). He was completely blown away by the things he saw DS say/do and said he is way ahead of the average 2yo... which kind of surprised me because DS really didn't say/do much in the time we were there. I know he's 'smart' but I guess I really overestimate what other kids his age are able to do and tend to think he's not all that advanced, whereas the doc seemed to think otherwise. He did see the way he 'shuts down' but said he's not 'shutting off' -- he isn't responding or smiling but he is clearly taking everything in... So now I'm left feeling like maybe I've over-reacted a bit? I'm certainly not completely writing off my concerns but I guess I feel comfortable giving him a couple more months and re-evaluating (or calling EI or whatever if necessary). What is interesting is, just since I first started this thread, DS has shown improvements! For ex, he walked to the store & back (maybe 1/3mi each way) the other day, even though he's rarely even walked from the car to the house before, and he participated in most of the songs/fingerplays/questions at story times over the last week as well. I swear he just likes to prove me wrong......
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by crunchy_mommy View Post

What is interesting is, just since I first started this thread, DS has shown improvements! For ex, he walked to the store & back (maybe 1/3mi each way) the other day, even though he's rarely even walked from the car to the house before, and he participated in most of the songs/fingerplays/questions at story times over the last week as well. I swear he just likes to prove me wrong......


This happens to me pretty much every time I post about a concern. It's like my patience about the issue is just one day too short. I can have been observing something for a few months, then come to a point where I need to decide if it's going to be addressed more seriously, post about it, and the next day, the issue is resolved. So, I've started writing my concern down, then not posting or asking anyone. I now have a decent folder of personal writing pieces. lol.gif

 

post #26 of 31
I have a not-gaining 3yo (hasn't gained a pound in about a year, though he has gotten a lot taller) and I like to think he's okay, so I can't comment on that. My thoughts were that he sounds a little SPD-ish and anxious, both of which are common in GT kids. The not walking part really stands out to me, but then I have pretty independent kids and so the concept is really foreig-- like I can't wrap my head around it. I'm not sure it's as unusual as it seems to me, though, esp. among attached kids of AP moms? I know I have known people who were still babywearing their kids at 4.
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellemenope View Post

Well, In my research I have come across stories of children who at 18 months were speaking in sentences, having conversation, knew abcs, could count, who had then by the time they were about four years old "regressed" to the point of not being able to converse normally, and who were being being diagnosed with ASD.  Very anecdotal, but it is enough for me to seriously watch my DD's development for that.  Especially, when she at times can be pretty quirky.  Certainly, the earlier we catch it the better.  And, in the cases I read about it seems early fast development clouded everyone's vision, and the ASD was able to do some real damage before it was addressed.

 

Not to derail this thread, but where did you read about these?

post #28 of 31

After reading your follow up posts, I'd probably get him checked out. I even got my son checked out. He got through most of the issues (slowly), but we still struggle with a lot. It seems to take him a really long time on some things. He also would not walk on the grass and didn't like to have his shoes off. It was like putting  cat in water trying to get him on the grass. He is still like that but with shoes he's alright...now. As far as his weight and height..I'd also ask about that just because they're not evenly matched. It might be ok; only a Pediatrician who looks at him and evaluates him in whole would be able to say though. I can't really comment on the not liking to walk and being clingy. It's hard for me to say anything actually. If I were you though, I'd mention it to his Dr. and see. I made a list and took it with me each time I'd go.  Finally the Ped. referred me to a Psych. who evaluated him in full and was able to help us out. 

 

Again there are things that with time and small, painless exposures we've gotten him through..and some he still struggles with. .. like til now no swings, rides, noise, etc. and He's almost 5.5 y/o. He's pretty picky about a few things still and children will have their ways. What is important I think is to get some help in identifying what's just quirky, but normal versus not normal according to him and in children overall through a couple of years in age, and figure out what would cause him any degree of dysfunction. So we were able to let a lot of things go and just leave him alone about them, but then we wanted to encourage in other ways to get through certain fears so he could function

 

 

post #29 of 31



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerle View Post

 

Not to derail this thread, but where did you read about these?


 

The short answer to that is on forums devoted to Autism and Asperger's.  This was about 6 months ago.  My DD was repeating back long questions verbatim without answering them.  It was only on these boards I found other parents talking about this.  I have since found it listed as a possible concern in a preschooler.  This is from Dr. Sears.

 

Quote:
 

Some children with autism don’t display enough obvious symptoms early on. It’s important for doctors and parents to also look for the following signs in preschoolers:

  • Out-of-context language – Children should engage in back-and-forth conversation that fits in the context of a situation. If a child frequently answers questions or spontaneously blurts out whatever’s on his mind in ways that don’t fit the conversation, this may be a concern.

  • Unusually advanced language skills – If a child is able to say the ABCs, recite nursery rhymes, list numerous famous composers or talk incessantly about one or two primary topics in a manner that far exceeds his peers but won’t converse about more simple and general topics, this may be a concern. It’s hard to imagine that such a brilliant child may have autism, but it’s possible.

  • Answering a question with a question – If you ask a child, “What is your favorite color?” and the child answers, “What is your favorite color…green,” that may be a concern.

  • Missing social cues – A child may understand language, but if he doesn’t pick up on sarcasm, humor, teasing or lying, this is a concern.

  • Unaware of personal space – A child with autism may hug total strangers and stand very close to other children in an unusual way.

  • OCD tendencies – A child with autism may display some obsessive-compulsive behaviors, such as demanding all doors remain closed (or open), keeping food items separated on a plate, arranging toys or objects in lines, or wearing only certain clothes.

 

There are many parents out there that will claim that their now diagnosed child was typically developing, even advanced up until a certain age.   If you lurk around these boards you will find comments made about seemingly brilliant toddlers who "regressed", although it does seem to be pretty uncommon.  Regression is not supposed to happen in AS.  Advanced language development is not supposed to happen in Autism (or RASD.)  RASD has even been suspected to be an entirely different type of disorder than ASD.

 

What I think is happening in many of the cases I read about is that the early development of the positive traits of AS (amazing memory, advanced language, literacy) emerges first and then the regression is actually the lack of expected social/emotional development exacerbated by an acute flareup of a disorder/disorders that seem to co-occur with ASD (SPD, reflux, bowel disease, ADHD, OCD, anxiety, and most devastating, seizure disorders.) 

 

There were instances where parents conceded that there were signs but they were in all cases ignored because of such profound intelligence.  One case I will never forget was about a 12 month old who toe-walked.  When the young toddler was asked why she was doing that, she answered, "I am being a flamingo!"  This child seemingly regressed at age 2.5 and was diagnosed with AS and Celiac.
 

I was in no way implying that I think the OP's DS is on the spectrum.  I would never...  I was trying to answer her question that yes, even though my DD's early development had been advanced, I do pay attention to these things, and this is why.  I don't dwell on it, but I just can't help but to think about what I think is going on.

post #30 of 31
Thread Starter 
Despite the assurance from our doctor this is still nagging me in the back of my mind (compounded by the fact that I'm considering switching doctors because I'm pretty sure he is not thorough enough with his exams). When DS is out of his element and we're around lots of other kids, the differences really stand out... but still, he has improved just in the last couple weeks, so maybe I just need to give him time. *sigh*
post #31 of 31

While I can't totally identify with your post, my dd was pretty anti-social until past two.  It was more like three that she began to open up, and even then, not much.  Now, at almost six, I can't keep her quiet.  She LOVES being in new places with new people.  Her interactions are still a little different socially, but she is more than okay academically.  Easily two or more years ahead.  When I read checklists about Asperger's, I can find quite a few that fit her. 

 

But, the real question is what would I do with a diagnosis of any sort?  The answer at this point is nothing.  So, I don't bother reading or worrying, or the like.  We just treat her like her, and try to give her extra help understanding social situations.  We've talked with her about how she sees things differently, and that she has to work extra hard to communicate.  We've talked about how that will make her an extra good communicator when she is a grown-up, because most people don't get the chance to practice so much.

 

I guess what I'm trying to say is that two is still pretty little, and maybe he just needs a bit more time.  He seems plenty on track, which is like dd, and she eventually mostly grew out of it.  (At two, she would spin in circles for 10-15 minutes at a time, not getting dizzy at all, repeating the same thing over and over and over again.  She would tell the exact thing, verbatim, to 6 or 7 people in a row...I'm talking about a paragraph worth of material.  She would say something over and over to me, regardless of my answer.  She wouldn't talk to hardly any other grownups and was always super serious.  She mostly wanted held, or to nurse, in new situations.  Just to give you an idea of where I am coming from.)

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