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Most of toddler's diet is grassfed raw milk - how much is OK? - Page 2

post #21 of 24

"Wouldn't she have some kind of negative symptoms if she had a dairy intolerence?  Her growth has been great and normal, she's been very very healthy - no real illness at all, normal bowel movements, she's meeting all milestones, early even, her behavior is great."

 

 

I am going through the SAME thing with my daughter! She is 34 months old. Healthy, happy, normal bowel movements, really smart, great behavior, hardly ever sick. She has no symptoms if milk intolerance except when she was drinking pasteurized milk for a brief period of time. I tried breastfeeding her when she was born, but due to a deformity of her mouth, she was unable to latch. I expressed milk until she was 18 months old, and then I switched her onto raw milk when I could no longer supply her with my milk. She has always chosen the raw milk over solid foods. Even now, she will turn down solid foods for milk all the time. I feel that what happens is she gets so full on the raw milk because it supplies so many nutrients and fills her up, especially with such a high fat content, that she has no appetite for food later on. I found the best way for her to gain an appetite was watering the milk down or removing as much of the cream off the top as you can. I make butter out of it, and she drinks the buttermilk too. This helped me to remove the fat without compromising the health benefits of the milk, and increased her appetite for solid foods. It changes day to day though. Some days she wants lots of milk, and some days she has an excellent appetite for solid foods. I wouldn't be worried about it though. As long as she is healthy, happy and making her milestones then it shouldn't matter. Raw milk is far more beneficial to your health than most foods you could replace it with.

I'm surprised by some of the responses I've seen on here in regards to this topic. Weaning too early? Dairy intolerances? Nut milk alternatives? Raw milk only for baby calves? Silly. My family is from Northeastern Europe, and for centuries our ancestors have thrived off raw milk. Milk and meat were the primary sources of nutrition during the winter months when nothing else grew. This is why so few Caucasian's are lactose intolerant, while most peoples from African and Asian ancestries are lactose intolerant. Any of the "milk alternatives" do not provide whole nutrition. Please do not feed your children nut milks, especially not soy. They do not contain the proper nutrients needed for healthy development, and this is why all nut milks sold at grocery stores have synthetic vitamins added to them.

post #22 of 24

"Wouldn't she have some kind of negative symptoms if she had a dairy intolerence?  Her growth has been great and normal, she's been very very healthy - no real illness at all, normal bowel movements, she's meeting all milestones, early even, her behavior is great."

 

 

I am going through the SAME thing with my daughter! She is 34 months old. Healthy, happy, normal bowel movements, really smart, great behavior, hardly ever sick. She has no symptoms if milk intolerance except when she was drinking pasteurized milk for a brief period of time. I tried breastfeeding her when she was born, but due to a deformity of her mouth, she was unable to latch. I expressed milk until she was 18 months old, and then I switched her onto raw milk when I could no longer supply her with my milk. She has always chosen the raw milk over solid foods. Even now, she will turn down solid foods for milk all the time. I feel that what happens is she gets so full on the raw milk because it supplies so many nutrients and fills her up, especially with such a high fat content, that she has no appetite for food later on. I found the best way for her to gain an appetite was watering the milk down or removing as much of the cream off the top as you can. I make butter out of it, and she drinks the buttermilk too. This helped me to remove the fat without compromising the health benefits of the milk, and increased her appetite for solid foods. It changes day to day though. Some days she wants lots of milk, and some days she has an excellent appetite for solid foods. I wouldn't be worried about it though. As long as she is healthy, happy and making her milestones then it shouldn't matter. Raw milk is far more beneficial to your health than most foods you could replace it with.

I'm surprised by some of the responses I've seen on here in regards to this topic. Weaning too early? Dairy intolerances? Nut milk alternatives? Raw milk only for baby calves? Silly. My family is from Northeastern Europe, and for centuries our ancestors have thrived off raw milk. Milk and meat were the primary sources of nutrition during the winter months when nothing else grew. This is why so few Caucasian's are lactose intolerant, while most peoples from African and Asian ancestries are lactose intolerant. Any of the "milk alternatives" do not provide whole nutrition. Please do not feed your children nut milks, especially not soy. They do not contain the proper nutrients needed for healthy development, and this is why all nut milks sold at grocery stores have synthetic vitamins added to them.

post #23 of 24

I wouldn't worry about it. Good quality raw milk (preferably from Jersey cows) is a whole food. You could survive on that alone and still be healthy! If she is eating other foods as well then I wouldn't worry about it. She will grow out of it eventually but will still retain a love for raw milk. I say your doing great Momma! Oh and 2 years of BF is great! You should give yourself a pat on the back and not feel guilty one bit about not going longer.

post #24 of 24

My 2yo drinks 18 - 24 oz of raw milk a day and he's doing very well with it. He also loves his milk. I wouldn't give him more than that because I worry a bit about iron, but otherwise I don't see a problem with it. I also don't give him crackers anymore, he never had nut milks either.

 

Good job on breastfeeding for so long!

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