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Raw goat milk

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Is goat milk comparable to cow milk, nutritionally. I mean, I know there are differences and they have kind of different diets. Does WAPF have a stance on this. I think I might be slightly intolerant to cow milk and I have the opportunity to milk some grass-fed goats so I'm going to try it. Anyone know about K2 and other things that cow milk has and if they are in goat milk? eat.gif
post #2 of 13

Goat milk is closer to human milk than cow's milk is. That's what I know. :-)

 

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
That's what I've always heard too. It looks like WAPF recommended cow milk over goat, at least for infant formula. I'm still reading though. I'm interested in the difference between A1 and A2 and that has come up a little in my reading. This is all new to me. I guess goat milk has less (or doesn't have) folic acid and I know that there is something different about the vitamin A (which it why it is so white and cow milk is more yellow).
I think that the closeness to human milk has to do with the protein composition and not the other nutrients but I don't know. I'd love to hear other ideas. The only info I have found is in little blurbs of other articles on WAPF, mostly about infant formula.
post #4 of 13

Apparently a lot of people with mild dairy intolerance are actually intolerant of A1 (if I remember correctly, the protein that's in most cow's milk, anyway).  Goat's milk doesn't contain that protein but contains A2 instead (assuming that I remembered which was which).  Goats have traditionally been considered better than cows to raise most kinds of mammal babies on.  It was my understanding that at least the folk wisdom even applies this to humans.  And it is the fat/protein/sugar composition of goat's milk that makes it more similar to human milk, although it's really not that different from cow's milk.  There's often just as much variation from goat to goat as there is between goats and cows.

 

Cow's milk is yellowish because of the beta-carotene in it, goat's milk does not contain beta-carotene but does contain vitamin A.  Since beta-carotene is a precursor to vitamin A, they might contain the same amount of Vitamin A once you're done with the conversion.  There is an enzyme added to homogenized cow's milk that keeps the fat from rising to the top - this enzyme can cross into your bloodstream and cause atherosclerosis.  Goat's milk is naturally homogenized, so the cream doesn't rise to the top in the first place.  If you're used to low-fat milk, it might taste a little rich.  Depending on the laws where you live, you might want to be a little cautious if you're buying raw goat milk - it might be illegal.

 

The second paragraph comes from my dairy goat book, the first is things I've picked up on the internet and in discussion with people . . . which is why those points are a little more hazy.

 

If your goat milk tastes strong, and you're not the one milking the goats, be a little suspicious of the cleanliness standards in the milking parlor.  It should taste very mild, not noticeably different than cow's milk.  Once in a while if the goat eats something with a strong flavor it will affect the milk's flavor (mustards are bad for this, or so I hear), but if it always tastes strong then it might not be getting chilled quickly enough, or the teats might not be getting cleaned thoroughly enough.

 

Hope that helps . . . I haven't actually milked my goats yet, but I'm going to start this summer.  Good luck, I hope it gets rid of any intolerance symptoms you've had.

post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Cool, that's pretty much what I thought. Though I guess some cows have A2 also and they are starting to test for it. Very interesting.... I guess there is speculation that all the dairy cows will be bred to produce A2 in the near future.

I'm milking the goats to help someone out. The milk is very yummy, not goaty AT ALL! It tastes sweet and creamy!

I didn't realize that they add an enzyme to cow milk, I thought it was a mechanical process. I might look into that.

Thanks for the info!
post #6 of 13

Take a look at this site... it shows in detail all nutrients in goat milk. You are actually upgrading your body! http://www.everything-goat-milk.com/goat-milk-vs-cow-milk.html.

 

Can't get any better! 

post #7 of 13

All I can add is that we have replaced cows milk with goats milk for years now and the odd time I drink cows milk again, like when I am traveling or have a latte, wow do I notice the difference! My tummy rumbles when I drink cows milk. Same with my son, he gets gas from cows milk but can drink all the goats milk he wants.

Unfortunately it is very hard to get raw milk or any kind here, so I can't answer for that.

post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllForPrecious View Post

Take a look at this site... it shows in detail all nutrients in goat milk. You are actually upgrading your body! http://www.everything-goat-milk.com/goat-milk-vs-cow-milk.html.

 

Can't get any better! 


that link doesn't work. I'd love to read it though!
post #9 of 13

Goat milk is low in folic acid and vitamin B12. Just eat some eggs and liver (chicken or beef). If you are a vegetarian find some raw veggies there are plenty.

post #10 of 13

Here it is: http://www.everything-goat-milk.com/vitamins-in-milk.html

 

Fascinating notes2.gif

post #11 of 13
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hykue View Post

If your goat milk tastes strong, and you're not the one milking the goats, be a little suspicious of the cleanliness standards in the milking parlor.  It should taste very mild, not noticeably different than cow's milk.  Once in a while if the goat eats something with a strong flavor it will affect the milk's flavor (mustards are bad for this, or so I hear), but if it always tastes strong then it might not be getting chilled quickly enough, or the teats might not be getting cleaned thoroughly enough.

 


I just wanted to touch on this quickly. I have 3 goats. One of them has undrinkable milk. I have NO idea what the problem is, we've added mineral and yeast to her feed, changed to strictly alfalfa (they get alfalfa/hay mix in the winter/spring and free choice pasture when its not covered in snow), and wormed her twice, and it still tastes off. She doesn't like her mineral, so maybe that's the real reason, but I can't get her to take anything free choice and she sort of snorts it off her grain. Its really kinda gross, actually. My second goat has low fat milk. Its fine to taste but not thick and creamy. My third goat has delicious rich and creamy milk. They are all Lamanchas. 

 

My dh can not drink cow's milk, but he tolerates goat's milk fine. I LOVE milk, and I LOVE having well treated happy goats providing it for me!

post #13 of 13

Hi - We transitioned our dd from breast milk to raw goat milk.  We drive the to goat farm and purchase about five gallons at a time as it is very expensive in the store (Poplar Hill Goat Farm).  We add one drop of Folate + B12 to one of her glasses of milk per day as this was the only indication of nutrition difference that seemed to need tending too.  DD also loves eggs, eats a lot of fruits and veggies.

 

I however can't tolerate either cow or goat milk.  I think I react to both casein and lactose (the protein and the sugar).  I can digest Happy Valley Organic lactose free milk.  I talked with one of the owners and he indicated that they also put enzymes into their cottage cheese product, which is the only cottage cheese I can eat. 

 

My reaction is that I get super-phlegmy in my throat and about 24 hours after I consume dairy I sound like a cat with a fur ball. 

 

I also talked with both husband and wife owners of Poplar Hill Goat Farm for about an hour each on the nutrition, health standards, etc.etc. of goat farms.  Since we visit the farm directly and drop in any time, it's clear to us the goats are clean and well taken care of.  The wife mentioned she raised three sons on raw goat milk and they are healthy, all over 6'. 

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