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If you spend <$25 per person per week on groceries... - Page 2

post #21 of 46

I'm waiting for Dmitrizmom to tell us her secrets! 

post #22 of 46

I watch for sales on just about everything.  chicken - I won't pay more than 80 cents a pound for the breasts or 60 cents a pound for hindquarters.  When I make chicken for a meal, I will make an extra couple pieces that then become the base for the next meal.  Like this week:

Meal 1: Oven roasted chicken with carrots, celery, onion, and steamed red pepper, cauliflower and broccoli. Total cost: $5.42

Meal 2: chicken enchiladas and bean enchiladas with salad (actually enough for dinner for all and lunches for adults for two additional days): $22.01

Meal 3: Chicken noodle soup and saltine crackers (enough left for lunch).  Cost: approximately $6.75

Meal 4: goulash and buttered bread (with leftovers for lunch): Cost: approx. $9

Meal 5: sandwiches and soup (like canned tomato soup and grilled cheese): Cost: approx $5.58

Meal 6: roast beef with veggies and gravy.  Cost: $10.24

Meal 7: beef soup or stew with bread: Cost: $4.97

Dinner total: ~$64

 

Lunches:

4 days covered by leftovers

3 days: sandwiches and a side: ~$10

 

Breakfast:

Day 1: eggs and sausage: $2

Day 2-Day 6: cereal:  $9

Day 7: pancakes and bacon: $4

Breakfast total: $15

 

Grand total: $89/week

 

Only way to do it: buy sales when they are hot, make ample use of deep freeze and pantry space to stock up.  Some weeks are more.  Some weeks are less.  This is our last week and is pretty average.  Our grocery store will deep discount produce that is on the edge and price lower for bulk (or on Saturday nights they mark down stuff that they can't keep over Sunday when they are closed), so I watch for that and use it right away (or freeze after initial prep).  If I'm making soup, I stretch it with cheap veggies, broth, noodles - and I try to make enough to cover us for lunch the next day or to freeze for sometime when I don't want to cook.  I have a feeling that this will be going up though, since the cost of beef is going up by over $1/lb. :(

post #23 of 46

We spend under $15/person/week. We are a family of 5 and my budget is $75/week. There are MANY weeks that I only spend $30, so the rest balances for those bigger shopping trips to Sam's club or when we have parties or special occasions. I shop at Aldi, coupon, stock up, buy in bulk, and occasionally barter as well. We do eat quite a bit of natural foods and foods from scratch, but not a ton of organic.

 

My children do get reduced price lunches at school, so two of them eat lunch eat day for $0.40, breakfast is usually cereal, snacks are usually pretzels, popcorn, fruit, or cereal. Those of us who are at home for lunch will usually have leftovers from dinner. I don't usually have a snack myself. And then dinner is usually simple like a roasted chicken and baked potatoes or soup and salad or leftovers.

 

In order to eat really cheaply, we have to buy according to what is on sale and not what we want. I just got 10 boxes of cereal and 3 gallons of milk today for $1.70 after coupons and a mail-in-rebate. It doesn't matter if we would rather eat Kashi or Greek yogurt... we will be eating cornflakes and crispix for breakfast for awhile. When apples are $1.49 for a 3lb bag, that is what we get rather than those awesome looking raspberries for $4.

post #24 of 46

We are a "family" of 9 right now (counting everyone in our house) but I typically only buy for DS and myself.  Though occasionally, we will have a group meal and everyone will pitch in an item.  Usually that's when we have fish since that's really the only meat I eat.

 

1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods?

Not really buying organic very often right now.  I used to, but I'm currently in school and unemployed.  So its just not in the budget unless its on sale and/or I have a coupon.  I do buy whole/natural foods as much as possible, but if I can get prepackaged V8 soup or something nearly free with a coupon, I'm not going to pass it up.  I figure as long as there's no crap on the label, I don't care if it comes in a box. LOL

 

2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables?  (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?)

I never buy frozen or canned fruit.  I just don't like it at all.  I buy strawberries (my weakness), plums, and nectarines for us both and bananas, apples, blueberries, or pears just for DS.  Just depends on what's a good deal that week.  He's more adventurous than I in the food department, so occasionally I will pick up something different if its a good deal.  As for vegetables, we like potatoes, sweet potatoes, and broccoli fresh, though I don't mind frozen broccoli.  Carrots, peas, and lima beans I buy canned or frozen, depending on sales.  Those are my typical staples, but again, I don't want DS to be as picky as I am, so I don't restrict it to just those items.

 

3. What do you eat for breakfasts?

DS has an egg every morning, plus oatmeal or a small yogurt.  I've been buying the Dannon DanoNino brand.  Its not organic, but its dye/HFCS/preservative free.  Plus, its a smaller portion, so he's able to eat all of it.  When I was buying the YoBaby and YoToddler, a lot would go to waste.  Of course, I could just buy it in the large tubs, which would probably be cheaper, but I can't find a brand not aimed at babies/kids that isn't low fat or fat free.  And DS just doesn't need anything fat free.  Myself, I have coffee every morning and usually just a bit of fruit or maybe a small bowl of cereal.

 

4. What do you eat for snacks?

Fruit, cereal, cheddar cheese cubes (I cut my cheese up myself rather than buy the bags of cheese cubes), and DS also likes granola, carrot sticks, and cherry tomatoes. 

 

5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net, search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.)

89% in my current town.  Not bad.

 

One thing I wanted to share about milk if you buy soy, coconut, almond, or some other alternative milk as I do.  If you watch the sales and use coupons, you can save a lot, especially if you aren't brand loyal.  For example, this week at Kroger, 1/2 gallon refrigerated cartons of Silk are $2.  I was able to print 2 $1.25 off 1, 2 $1 off 1, and 4 $.75 off 1 coupons (and you could print more if you have multiple computers).  If I did the math right, that's $2.15 a gallon.  Obviously, you can't stock up TOO much on refrigerated milk, so that brings me to the Almond Dream shelf-stable quarts that were also on sale for $2 each.  I used two coupons for $.50 off (that double to $1) so I got the first two for $1 each.  Then there were blinkie coupons on the shelf for $.55 off making them $1.45 a quart (or less if you're lucky and your store doubles over $.50).  Obviously, they are still quite a bit more per gallon that the current sale on Silk, BUT its still cheaper than the refrigerated 1/2 gallons at full price.  So when the sale is over and my 1/2 gallon cartons run out, I still have a bit of a stash left and don't have to run out and pay $3.55 for a 1/2 gallon.

post #25 of 46

1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods?

Mostly. I don't buy foods with hfcs, artificial flavors, colors etc except for the random candy or something like that.. Mainly I try to shop at Trader Joe's because it's inexpensive, high quality items.

 

2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables? (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?)

We buy a lot of apples & bananas. Bananas I purchase at either costco (1.43 a bunch) or Trader Joe's for 19 cents a banana. We also do a lot of frozen fruit for smoothies. Veggies we do salads, celery, carrots, onions, mushrooms etc fresh then , frozen brocoli, corn, etc.

 

3. What do you eat for breakfasts?

toast, cereals, eggs, yogurt, smoothies

 

4. What do you eat for snacks?

We are having issues with this because my kids have turned into ravenous monkeys.. but apples, yogurt, bananas, granola bars, homemade cookies, etc

 

5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net, search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.)

 

The location we shop in is 11.7 percent higher than national average.

 

post #26 of 46

Ugh! I'm new so I don't know if I'm doing something wrong or what, but I've tried to edit my post.. but regardless I wanted to add:

 

We are a family of four, two boys who are 4 & 6 and me who is pregnant, and hubby.

 

I spend between 50 and 100 dollars a week on groceries. I purchase milk, bread, watermelon and bananas at Costco every week, then every month or so turkey and cheese as well. The rest is spent at Trader Joe's. If anyone's interested I'd love to share our meal plans.

post #27 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurac5 View Post

1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods? Sometimes. Not always. Cost tends to be more important.

 

2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables?  (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?) Frozen, fresh or dried mostly. I buy canned tomatoes sometimes. I buy the same thing most of the time and occasionally get something we don't usually have. I don't look for the cheapest thing but what people will eat.

 

3. What do you eat for breakfasts? It varies by person and day. I eat leftovers frequently. Dd will eat cereal, a sandwich, oatmeal or something. Dh will eat yogurt or a bagel.

 

4. What do you eat for snacks? It varies. Fresh fruit, vegetables, eggs, popcorn, crackers, dried fruit, nuts, granola bars.

 

5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net, search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.) My location food cost is 91.

 

 



 

post #28 of 46

We're a family of 6 and I spend an average of $125-150 a week for groceries which includes paper products and cleaning supplies I buy at the grocery store (although I make most of my own and so some of those items are purchased in non-grocery stores).

 

I try to preserve organic fruits and veggies in the summer but I don't tend to buy them at the grocery store unless they are on sale. I don't buy much in the way of processed items - mostly condiments, pasta and crackers so most of what I buy is in its natural state/single ingredients.

 

For fruits and veggies we use what we can from our garden and what I can preserve (freeze or can in season). Last year I canned tonnes of tomatoes, peaches, pears, applesauce and frozen lots of berries, rhubarb, beans, zuchini and peppers. This year I hope to be able to freeze peas, and corn and freeze/can more fruit. In the off season we supplement with fresh - based on what is on sale, and as wide a variety as possible. We buy some frozen veggies - spinach, corn, peas primarily and some frozen fruit as we run out of our stores (definitely need more raspberries and strawberries this year). We shop a local farmer's market all year round where we can get good deals on good quality veggies in the winter and I buy seconds of apples cheap cheap which I sort and use to eat fresh or for cooking.

 

Breakfasts are typically smoothies, baked oatmeal, applesauce or fruit salad with toast/muffins, eggs, or granola, yogurt w fruit.

 

Snacks: fruit, veggies, baked goods, popcorn, nuts, cheese, granola

post #29 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by danaf617 View Post

We're not even close!!  blush.gif

 

I spend about $175/week for 2 adults and 2 kids.  (almost 3 and 4.5)  I do buy mostly organic and tons of fresh produce and chicken.  This also includes items like laundry detergent (when I don't make my own), toilet paper, etc.


me neither.  I'm at about $40 per person per week.  Of course since we don't eat grains, soy or most beans (allergies) and the kids don't do dairy or peanuts (again, allergies) so what we're left with is the expensive stuff. I don't know that I could get much lower, but I'm always trying!

 

I don't do much organic, we do get our eggs from a farm and shot the farmer's markets.  We do eat a good amount of meat, which is necessary for us and not negotiable at this point.  I don't really do many convenience foods as they're not an option.  The exceptions are sweet potato chips, larabars, fruit gummi things on occasion.  I order what I can in bulk (coconut oil, almond butter/flour etc.)

 

I can't do the school lunch program for obvious reasons so sending foods to school is a pricey situation.  Portable things that fit our criteria are not generally inexpensive.

 

breakfast are smoothies with almond butter/coconut oil/spinach or kale and fruit, almond meal pancakes or waffles, eggs and hashbrowns or sausage and fruit.  I may occasionally make coconut flour muffins.

 

Snacks are fruit, nut based things, coconut yogurt if on sale, veggies with dip, sweet potato chips with guacamole etc.

 

My location food cost is 116.  That ain't helping.

post #30 of 46

We spend about $100-120  a week for a family of 5, so that is what- $20 per person? We eat as much local as we can, with organic when it is on sale. I also shop for shelf stable items every 2 weeks, and stock up when I can. I am also getting involved in our local buying club, so I will be able to get more organic foods for less money. I found that I have to be very creative with our meals and not allow the kids to snack all the time. We also bake a lot, making our own breads.

 

 

post #31 of 46

1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods? We mostly buy whole foods and cook from scratch, but not to the degree of grinding our own flour and baking our own bread all the time. I do grind my own flour for some meals, but we don't eat bread that often. I buy it for those times. I do grind my own powdered sugar (organic) for those random times. Go figure. LOL We buy a mix of organic and non-organic; nearly everything is "natural" versus processed...

 

2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables?  (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?) We have a year-round CSA, so we eat mostly local, organic, in season fruits and veggies. We supplement a bit here and there with fresh. We never buy canned veggies (due to taste more than anything else), but do buy canned fruit once in awhile. We buy frozen organic corn at Trader Joe's and sometimes other veggies we don't get from our CSA. We also grow some produce. We eat a lot of fresh produce.

 

3. What do you eat for breakfasts? All sorts of things! Not real picky about the "traditional" breakfast foods. My favorite is spinach and other greens omelets in coconut oil.

 

4. What do you eat for snacks? All sorts of things! Carrots and fruit are my favorites. Carrots for the CRUNCH; fruit for it's natural sweetness. Nuts, too, for the fill-factor.

 

5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.)

Our location is 148 overall. Food is 103.

 

We are a family of 3 plus a raw food fed cat. DD eats more than I do! We used to spend $335 per month on average, which is ~$26/person and includes our CSA and all other food (including the cat's). That didn't include our dining out category, which I have been slowly lowering over the years. This year (2011), I increased our food budget (still includes CSA and all other food, except dining out) to $350 per month on average, which puts us ~$27/person. I lowered our dining out category yet again. We're doing well and our overall food costs keep going down while our quality of food has increased. Anyway, our $26-27 per person per week average works with the comparison cost of living of 103.

 

When we travel and/or camp, our food choices are altered a bit. We eat more simply and add a few more convenience tactics/foods. I thought it was "bad" until we recently camped with Girl Scouts and I was in charge of buying the food for our troop. OH MY! The foods these other leaders wanted and the way we compromised our ordinary food & environmental practices values made me really reevaluate the way I judge myself. Also made me realize what some working mothers face with their own ideas of "quality time" and how they compromise meals to spend more time with their children. Tough choices!!!


Edited by sunnysandiegan - 5/12/11 at 3:54pm
post #32 of 46

We have an interesting food situation...for just food though I think we spend about $20 per person per week.  There are 3 girls (8, 11, 14) and me and my friend who eats over here about 3-7 nights a week.    We also have a neighbor girl who has after school snacks and dinner at least once a week.  

 

Some things I do to save money:

almond milk instead of dairy milk.  Longer shelf life, smaller containers, shelf stable before it is open.  We never lose any to expiration.  

We do not drink milk or juice.  Milk is for cereal only.

I shop at sams.  for almost everything.  and I will admit it.  walmart.

I work at a grocery store which makes it easy for me to stock up when there is a sale. I also get meat for cheap and only eat meat of cheap meat is available.

I have a garden during the summer.

 

I am not including any non food items in that total.  No dog food or kitty litter or cosmetics.  Just the people food.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by laurac5 View Post

1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods?

 

2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables?  (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?)

 

3. What do you eat for breakfasts?

 

4. What do you eat for snacks?

 

5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net, search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.)

 

 

My family of 2 adults and 1 toddler (who eats 1/4-1/2 an adult serving) is stuck at $75ish a week (although that includes non-food items) and I'm looking for some ways to shave that down a bit.  Our food cost of living is 109% the national average.

 

Update: Changed the post title to be cost per person... I definitely did not think about the fact that for a family of 4, $50/week  would be incredibly tight!

 

Thanks!


1.  Some, not a lot.  If the price is within a few cents or cheaper I go organic but otherwise we go normal or do without.

 

2.  I do a lot of fresh and a lot of frozen.  Some canned but not a lot.

 

3.  My kids eat cereal and I eat a protein bar.  My schedule at worked changed today so I will now have time to make them eat something better.  LOL  

 

4.  snacks - fruit, veg, cheese, crackers, pickles (I get gallon jars of pickles for $4), popcorn is a favorite.  

 

5.  I can't get the link to work so I don't know how we compare but I think we are in the middle.

 

post #33 of 46

Family of 5 with one on the way (so DH, Myself, 6yo, 4yo, 2yo).  We spend $100/week at the store and that has to cover everything from food to soap to toilet paper to whatever.  DD1 has celiac disease which limits our options a bit and affects the budget somewhat.  (we can't have gluten in the house, so nothing with wheat, barley, or rye or things made with derivatives like food starch).  We don't eat a lot of meat...maybe 1-2 times a week with red meat 3-4 times a year.  We have chickens so that helps.

 

1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods?

--- some.  We buy organic soy milk and during the summer/fall we participate in an organic/local CSA.  Other than that, cost is the bottom line so I tend to buy seasonal/local rather than organic.

 

2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables?  (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?)

--During the growing season we get all our veggies fresh on the farm.  We can, freeze, and dry some produce and during the "off" season make do with apples and other "winter" fruit.  Frozen fruit is a big treat, and exotic fresh fruits (bananas, kiwis, and so on) is also a treat.  Melons and other summer/fall goodies are generally eaten in season till we're stuffed!

 

3. What do you eat for breakfasts?

--hot oatmeal (use a slow cooker and make it while we sleep), hot rice (brown rice is a wonderful hot breakfast, just treat it like oatmeal), lots of eggs (we have chickens), sometimes cold cereal or yogurt.

 

4. What do you eat for snacks?

--apple slices with peanut butter, rice cakes with hummus, carrots, yogurt

 

5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net, search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.)

--a bit high at 104

 

post #34 of 46

We are still spending around $100/week for two adults and we do share with our roommate occasionally. (Though he feeds us some as well).  We get $300/month of food stamps, and it usually runs out 7-10 days before the end of the  month.  My goal is to not spend any non-food stamp money on food.

 

 

 

1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods?
Natural when we can, but most things like that are too expensive!


2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables? (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?)
I will get frozen veggies, and we drink a lot of juice and V8 Fusion.  Hubby hates veggies, so that's about as healthy as I can get him to be.


3. What do you eat for breakfasts?

I am not a breakfast person, and neither is he.  Right now, I have a cup of black tea and a Fiber One bar.

4. What do you eat for snacks?
Too much junk.  Trying to work on that. Marshmallows are good, toast, eggs.


5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net, search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.)
 

According to that site, out area is 9.20% below the national average.

 

 

post #35 of 46

I have a household of 6.5 (3 adults, 3.5 kids I promise they eat as much as their pregnant momma), I shop once a month for almost everything. Milk, eggs, produce is weekly.

 

My budget is $34  but I spend approx $27/ person/ week or $160/ week for 6 people

 

I buy 95% organic,

produce is a mix of fresh, frozen and canned - depends on cost

breakfast  - the adults eat egg sandwiches with cheese almost daily, kids eat eggs (they eat 3each!), oatmeal, english muffins, french toast, bagels etc

snacks are fruit, veggies, jelly bread, chips and salsa, cheese, crackers, raisins, nuts, popcorn, quesadillas, grilled cheese

 

We do almost no processed foods, I go to 5 different stores knowing what is cheaper where (that includes a bakery "day-old" store and barely anything from wal-mart type)  buying monthly saves a TON - money and time (It takes me 4 hours once a month) , we don't eat meat, we drink water, tea, coffee, lunches are kinda snacky or leftovers, I buy flour, sugar, nuts, etc from the bulk section.

post #36 of 46
Dmitrizmom-That is so helpful. Thank you!

Could anyone else share more specifics like meal plans?
post #37 of 46

Tonight we are having :

 

Rice with carrots, celery and green beans  3.00 bag of rice

Bag of frozen green beans on sale 10-10, Carrots 3.00 organic, celery 2.49

Turkey Luncheon meat with gravy 1.50 sale and coupon

 

So, for one meal for 2 adults and 3 children, we will use all the luncheon meat, half bag of green beans, 2 carrots, 2 celery stalks= 3.50 for the family

I stock on sale items, so I can save down the road. This is one of our cheaper meals.

 

We buy 2 bags of carrots every 2 weeks, one baby cut and one regular bag

10 bags of frozen veggies will last between 2weeks to a month, depending on how much fresh we have

Celery lasts us 2 weeks

 

 

post #38 of 46

Tonight, we had Indian curried chickpeas, basmati rice, and curried eggplant.  It's not quite eggplant season here, so these are just grocery store eggplant, at about $1/lb, and that was the pricey part of the meal.  Chickpeas cooked from dry(a$1.48/lb), basmati rice bought from the bullk bin, and the eggplant.  All the spices were bought from the bulk bin.  The onions, ginger, and garlic were from our international market.  I did use tomato paste bought on sale in January at a rocking sale, where I think I paid like $0.10/can.  I also used some tomatoes frozen from last year's garden. 


Total cost (for 2 adults, 3 children, plus 2 lunches) was about $4.00.

post #39 of 46

1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods? I  buy mostly "natural" things I think, in that I buy ingredients and turn them into meals.  I rarely buy organic

 

2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables?  (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?) Mostly fresh, although I keep some frozen corn and peas in the fridge because they're hard to get fresh and good most of the year.  I also keep some canned mandrin oranges in the cupboard because dh likes them.  Only canned veggies are tomatoes and tomato paste.  We generally have a decent variety of fruit, chosen from what's on sale on any given week.  Usually at least bananas, apples, and some sort of citrus.  Currently watermelon.  Soon to be strawberries. We always have carrots and onions and a few other vegetables depending on season and sales. I buy frozen mixed berries most of the year for breakfasts and smoothies.

 

3. What do you eat for breakfasts?  I eat berries, granola, and homemade yogurt.   Dh eats granola and milk, whatever fruit is in the bowl, and toast.  The kids eat toast or oatmeal or whatever cereal I've bought cheaply.  Generally store brand cheerios, corn flakes or rice krispies or puffed wheat.  Dh drinks oj or grapefruit juice, the kids drink oj or apple juice, and I drink coffee with milk. Dd likes smoothies for breakfast on weekends.

 

4. What do you eat for snacks?  Fruit, raw veggies, homemade muffins or cookies, popcorn, slice of bread and pb.  Dh eats about 10 pieces of fruit per day.  Ds and dd take cheese sticks for snacks at school.  Hardboiled eggs when eggs have been on sale.  Almonds are a favourite of ds.

 

5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net, search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.) Not in US, but in Canada prices tend to be more expensive than just south of the border in the US, especially meat, eggs, and dairy.

 

There are 6 of us.  Dh (who eats a ton), me (normal adult portions), ds12, dd9, dd7, dd3 (average for kids their ages I guess).



I budget $600/month, which is about $140/week.  I don't spend $140 every week though.  Once a month I go to costco and spend about $100 there alone on whole wheat flour, white flour, nuts, raisins, sugar, cheeses, sour cream, cottage cheese, cocoa, cereal, coffee, fresh spinach, frozen tortellini for a lazy supper, laundry soap, dishwasher detergent (I don't buy it all every month), pickles, jarred red peppers, olives.   I spend about $100 other weeks in other grocery stores.  I live within a mile or so of most of the major chains so I shop around on foot in summer and once a week in the car in winter.  I buy a lot of my produce from a produce only store, which is cheaper than grocery stores around here.

 

Our suppers for this week:

-veggie curry, basmati rice, homemade naan

-lentil spinach soup, spinach salad, grilled cheese on homemade bread for the kids

-pork tenderloin, mac and cheese, steamed broccoli and cauliflower (fresh, half a bunch of each leftover from other meals)

-cabbage/mushroom/tofu stir fry over basmati rice (rice, carrot sticks, leftover pork for picky kids)

-pizza (homemade crust, sauce made from tomato paste, mozza cheese, veggies left in fridge)

-tacos (meat cooked in large batch and from freezer, pintos cooked in large batch from dry and in freezer, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes, salsa from jar or homemade when tomatoes are in season, sour cream, guacamole made from avocados, homemade flour tortillas since the kids don't like corn tortillas)

-eggs, bacon (on sale this week), toast (homemade bread), fruit

 

I don't eat meat so I have leftovers from a previous night or skip that part of the meal when we have it.

 

I will add that my grocery prices are substantially higher than many people have mentioned earlier on the thread, and that's even with buying on sale.  My biggest tip for keeping down the grocery bill is to decide what you're eating based on what's cheapest and to stock up on staples when they're on sale, and know what a good price is so you know when to stock up.  I buy at least 6lbs when butter is $3/lb (rock bottom around here) and at least 3 dozen eggs when they're 3/$5 (rock bottom for here).  Regular price for butter is $4 and up per lb.  Eggs are $2.69/dozen regularly in grocery stores.  If they're not on sale, we do more baking with muffins that require oil, have less meals based around eggs, buy eggs at costco for $2.20/dozen. Meat gets purchased on sale and planned in that weeks groceries plus an extra for the freezer.  If there are no good meat sales, I don't buy any, plan more vegetarian meals, and defrost something from the freezer.  I make most of our bread, so I buy yeast in a 1lb package for about the same cost as the 1/4lb glass jars.  I keep a jar's worth in the fridge and the rest resealed in the freezer.  When I buy bread, I buy it from a bakery outlet or a local organic bakery that sells their day old stuff 50% off from their freezer.  Milk is always $5.54 for 4L (about a gallon), so I don't let the kids drink glass after glass at meal times.  We still go through 3 gallons per week between yogurt making, cooking, drinking, and cereal.

 


Edited by yeahwhat - 5/25/11 at 7:14pm
post #40 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by kittywitty View Post

Dmitrizmom-That is so helpful. Thank you!

Could anyone else share more specifics like meal plans?



Our meal plan this week (all dinners cover 6 people plus a lunch for my husband):

 

Dinners

Chili and salad     $9 (one pack ground turkey bought on sale, home canned tomaoes, canned beans bough on sale - the pot of chili will do 2 full meals (lunch and dinner) so cost per person/meal is less than $1.

Grilled Chicken Kabobs with rice    $8 (4 chicken breasts bought on sale, $1 rice, $2 for veggies pepper, onion, mushrooms, cherry tomatoes $1 marinade ingredients)

Veggie Stir Fry   $5 ($1 rice, veggies include carrots, celery, broc, zuchini, yellow pepper, snap peas and any other random leftover bits, topped with toasted sesame seeds and almonds)  

Homemade pizza   $5-6 (cheese bought on sale and shredded - this is the biggest expense for the pizza dinner - toppings are veggies, olives, and a bit of leftover bacon, I make my own dough and sauce which cost about $1 per meal)

Apple and Sausage Salad   $7 (1 pack of turkey sausage bought on sale, 2 large heads romain plus a few greens just coming up in the garden, 3 apples, 1 red pepper, celery, green onions, dressing made from maple syrup, vinegar and olive oil)

Pork tenderloin $6 (pork bought on sale, done in the crock pot), garlicy baked potato fries, steamed carrots and broccoli.

Sunday dinner - we're having friends so will be feeding 10 people -likely will make Chicken Pot Pie which costs us less than $10 for a lasagna tray size, plus fruit crisp from home canned fruit, rhubarb from the garden etc cost $4  They will bring salad.  Wine (home brewed) and beer $6 (not included in the groc budget)

 

Dinners for the week: $55 to make 65 servings

 

Lunches this week for the kids and I (we homeschool which makes cheap lunches easier):

black bean and orzo salad - $5 dollars will cover 2 lunches

foccacia and salad $3

broccoli soup and cheese biscuit $2 (make from ends of broc plus 1/2 a head, one onion, one carrot, one potato, frozen stock, dollop of homemade yogurt - its basically free - lol)

left over chili and leftover salad (factored above)

weekend lunches - tomato/lettuce/avocado sandwhich on homemade bread $2-3? depends on how much tomatoes are at the market 

turkey soup (frozen leftovers from Easter) $3ish (hard to quantify soup  from leftovers)

$16 to make 37 servings

 

For breakfasts I make up a big batch of granola which costs about $5-6 for a week's supply, 3 litres of yogurt $3, muffins $2-3 for a week's supply, dozen eggs $2.50, tray of baked oatmeal $2 and I bake a couple of loaves of bread $1 or less per loaf, and we supplement with fruit (mostly home canned or frozen).  The kids basically help themselves.

$20-22 for the week depending on fruit.  

 

Snacks

fruit, veggies and dip, popcorn, cheese and crackers, yogurt, granola, bread/muffins/quick loaves, nuts,  homemade popsicles in the summer

$10 - 15 per week depending on how many of the kids friends we are feeding

 

drinks each week - water, tea, 4L of milk (3 used for yogurt), 1 2L of soy milk (lasts about 10 days), 4L of apple cider in the winter, 2 cans of oj in the summer (for popsicles mostly), cream for coffee/ice cream

$10- 15ish per week

 

Total $120-130 ish per week  or $20 per person

 

This reflects what our meals cost but it doesn't show how we actually spend our money. I shop the sales and stock up and can/preserve a lot. So with the exception of the few fresh produce/dairy items we buy each week I may not have actually bought any of the items for our meal plan that week. We can easily eat out of our pantry/freezer and many times during tight weeks I have spent $20-30 for fresh fruits and veggies, a bit of dairy and maybe some things to fill in a couple of holes and we have managed a week of meals much like I have above. 

 

Hope that helps.

Karen

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