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2.5 year old learning how to read aurally - Page 2

post #21 of 25


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ellemenope View Post


What I think would happen would be that she would not care.


Then, there's your answer. Kids are born with an incredible ability to learn - we just need to listen and not try to impose our stuff in the middle of it. For what it is worth, prior to my child learning to read I never saw him following text, I never pointed out words, and I never traced with my finger. Who knows, he may have had more trouble learning to read if I did. I agree with Miranda that she's really too young to guess at learning styles. It may well be that she's aural at this age, but becomes less so in time. The sorts of memorization stuff you are describing was something we saw at that age, but over time it totally faded out.

 

As far as topics, really I don't think it is your job to make that happen. You can certainly go to the library and check out a stack of books. Go out into the community and do stuff - visit an arboretum, go to a concert, go to the planetarium... she'll find stuff that interests her.

 

post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 

Thank You Roar!  For the record, I didn’t think I was imposing my own agenda on her, but, yeah, I guess I was.  I thought a child who wanted to learn how to read and was doing so well aurally would want to actually read. I was just trying to do my best to help her do that.  But, I am aware that I can do more damage than good by interfering with her process.

 

I did print out some sentences yesterday and pasted them around her play room using words that I know are really easy for her.  She read them all eventually, but one made a huge impact on her.  "Matt is a bad frog."  She went crazy about this one.  I think she thought it was just so silly.  She keeps reading it over and over.  I think I could have a lot of success playing on her sense of humor in the future.

 

But, we have steered clear of reading books (at least the ones where I was encouraging her to read) and starfall.  We have played around more with words orally.  I taught her how to count syllables in words,  She does awesome at this.  I asked her to spell CVC words using letter names instead of letter sounds and she told me to go jump off a bridge.  Not really, but she made herself clear that she does not want to do that.  So, I only asked once. The last few days have been pretty good.

 

Today she was commenting on how there were carbohydrates in her crackers.  I asked her if she could count the syllables.  She did.  Then she asked me what carbo meant.  I had no idea.  I bumbled something about carbon (but I really have no idea.)  Then she said, "hydrate...is that like de-hydrate?  What does hydrate mean?"  I swear, she would probably enjoy talking about latin roots at this point.  This reminded me of the time I mentioned that that the marshmallows (we made homemade marshmallows for Christmas) were made among other things, gelatin.  She said, "Oh gelatin.  Like the jelly you put on english muffins...or a jelly fish...or gel."  Then she went off on a tangent.  "Would you rather go to gel or prison?"    I will NEVER forget that conversation.  I laughed so hard.  She was also convinced prison was by for the better choice.

 

 

 

For anyone interested in reading and vision, I found this.  It reads like a commercial for developmental optometry, but I found it in a PEGY article about 2e children. 

   

     Quote:  The Two-Edged Sword of Compensation: How the Gifted Cope with Learning Disabilities  By, Linda Kreger Silverman, Ph.D.

Children who begin reading at 2, 3, or 4 are bringing naturally far-sighted eyes into near-point focus, which can lead to slight muscular imbalances. This does not mean that parents should hide the books and the cereal boxes, so that a young ready-to-read mind is prevented from doing so. The imbalances are easily corrected. A behavioral optometrist who specializes in vision therapy can retrain the eyes within six months. Some gifted children have tracking problems—they lose their place when they are reading, or near-far/far-near focusing problems—they find it difficult to copy from the board. Children who play music by ear and cannot master the art of reading music may also have visual tracking difficulties. Children who hate puzzles may suffer from weak visual perception. And gifted children who begin to read well, then suddenly stop reading, may have difficulty reading smaller print. Some have poor binocular fusion, depth perception, visual discrimination, visual-motor coordination, or visual perception. These problems are not always easy to detect.

 

post #23 of 25

My guess is that she's a HG or PG kid and this is will be just one of many, many, many times when you will be pushed to reassess if what we know as the standard educational path will make sense for her. For what it is worth I expected certain stages before reading fluently - learning syllables, learning short words, etc. and we didn't see a lot of that. There was a lot of love of language, noticing patterns in spoken language, memorizing books, and playing around with sounds. It went straight from that sort of aural stuff to totally fluent reading pretty much overnight and there were no problems with tracking or spelling.

post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellemenope View Post

  I asked her to spell CVC words using letter names instead of letter sounds and she told me to go jump off a bridge.  Not really, but she made herself clear that she does not want to do that.  So, I only asked once. The last few days have been pretty good.

 

ROTFLMAO.gif  I've done this a few times with DS too and the last time he said "Whatever, Mom"  I got Whatevered by my 2 year old!!!

 

 

Today she was commenting on how there were carbohydrates in her crackers.  I asked her if she could count the syllables.  She did.  Then she asked me what carbo meant.  I had no idea.  I bumbled something about carbon (but I really have no idea.)  Then she said, "hydrate...is that like de-hydrate?  What does hydrate mean?"  I swear, she would probably enjoy talking about latin roots at this point.  This reminded me of the time I mentioned that that the marshmallows (we made homemade marshmallows for Christmas) were made among other things, gelatin.  She said, "Oh gelatin.  Like the jelly you put on english muffins...or a jelly fish...or gel."  Then she went off on a tangent.  "Would you rather go to gel or prison?"    I will NEVER forget that conversation.  I laughed so hard.  She was also convinced prison was by for the better choice.

 

 Wow! Her ability to make connections and play with language is amazing.  I wonder if there's a game like balderdash for kids.  She'd probably like it, or may like the adult version.

 



 

post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roar View Post

My guess is that she's a HG or PG kid and this is will be just one of many, many, many times when you will be pushed to reassess if what we know as the standard educational path will make sense for her. For what it is worth I expected certain stages before reading fluently - learning syllables, learning short words, etc. and we didn't see a lot of that. There was a lot of love of language, noticing patterns in spoken language, memorizing books, and playing around with sounds. It went straight from that sort of aural stuff to totally fluent reading pretty much overnight and there were no problems with tracking or spelling.


This was true of my oldest daughter as well. At 18-20 months, she memorized vast quantities of text the most impressive of which was the first Eloise book (87 pages). She spelled simple words and noticed print everywhere. Then, she clammed up about anything related to reading for a while. She still memorized all of her books and spent lots of time with them, but she didn't seem to be taking any more steps towards reading. Then, the week of her third birthday, I was reading her a new magazine that had come in the mail that day. I took a breath and she picked up where I had left off. She was absolutely fluent. My jaw dropped because she hadn't so much as sounded out a word in a year. For whatever reason, learning to read was an intensely private process for her and she only demonstrated the skill when she had mastered it.

 

She just turned 9 last week and has never had tracking issues or any kind of vision problems. Spelling is pretty effortless, too. 

 

This thread is very cool for me because I didn't get to watch my dd1 pass through the learning to read process. Enjoy!

 

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