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She has 10 cavities... I feel like I just got kicked - Page 2

post #21 of 52

my dd had quite extensive decay.

 

when her dentist, that recommended mineral paste, xylitol, and had no problem with continued nursing so long as her teeth were brushed, told us that it was time to do something, we did.

 

she did have versed, and was a little woozy upon waking. they had me come back as soon as she was waking up and they also had her go in first as she was the youngest. i can't tell you how happy i am that we had them fixed. she can eat apples. her teeth don't hurt her. and her smile isn't broken and decayed.

 

this dentist was also willing to do fillings on my ds, four and a half at the time, using nitrous and novacaine in the office. parents were welcomed back into the procedure room and watching him was just amazing. it seriously took him about three minutes to drill and fill. when he gave the shots to ds he had this way of juggling and distracting ds so he barely even knew the shot had happened. having an excellent dentist really made all the difference.

 

post #22 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chloebelle View Post




Yes, I stay away from fluoride too, but I like that it is a mainstream article, and it's suggesting that many fillings aren't necessary.

 

The remineralization powder looks interesting. Any idea if I can get this in Canada?

 

 

I am pretty positive you can order it from their direct website.  One of the most pure oils and ingredients that I can get in the states.  Austrailia is better.  But I dig that Uncle Harry's is a couple hours from me. 
 

 

post #23 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veslemor View Post

I had a wakeup call tho last week when I saw another bf'd kid in town who had apparently just had all his teeth pulled. 

 

That is just horrible.  That poor child.  I cannot imagine how that babes mama feels.... greensad.gif
 

 

post #24 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlayaMama View Post

 

this dentist was also willing to do fillings on my ds, four and a half at the time, using nitrous and novacaine in the office. parents were welcomed back into the procedure room and watching him was just amazing. it seriously took him about three minutes to drill and fill. when he gave the shots to ds he had this way of juggling and distracting ds so he barely even knew the shot had happened. having an excellent dentist really made all the difference.

 


I am glad to hear of a positive experience without GA.  Dentistry is really an art.  In the mouth and out. 

 

post #25 of 52

Just want to add that I was there for the procedures (we used Versed and laughing gas).  With the drug they constantly forget where they are and I had to keep saying everything is ok, watch the TV :-).  The dentist was getting frustrated because my ds would try to push the instruments with his tongue, but like I said, they are always forgetting.  So I would insist on being present to reassure them.

post #26 of 52
Thread Starter 

Oh, I am so happy about something... my DH is totally onboard for a lot of changes now. We're going to try grain-free as a family (I'm grain free but DH and DD aren't). I don't know if grains have anything to do with the cavities (probably only indirectly perhaps) but it's a good catalyst for change I've wanted to make for a while. Also, after reading comments here about making sure all of them need to be filled or whatever (and I know most dentists pretty much only know how to drill and fill, so the old "when all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail" proverb applies) it brought to the surface a concern I had that I couldn't really articulate. I was feeling that we were going to get everything drilled and filled but not really *fixed*. 2 hours away from here is a holistic dentist who is seriously the best doctor I've ever had (of any specialty) and it's not just because he's holistic and woo-woo and therefore fits into my crunchy life view. I really was so impressed by his thorough knowledge, his thoroughness, the way he explained things to me (and he explained a LOT of things). So I asked DH what he thought about maybe taking DD to see him instead, and I was kind of tentative about it (and it's inconvenient, 2 hours away, and not that cheap either) but he was onboard. He too wanted to see someone we could trust, and if this guy tells me that X number of teeth need to be filled (and there is no doubt in my mind that at least 2 do... I can see them plain as day and I have low vision) then I will believe him. Even if he says all 10. I will believe him, because I trust him. I don't know or trust this new dentist, and honestly I think the majority of dentists don't know anything about health. Anyway, I'm just happy that, as awful as this is, it may be something that will change things overall for the better. Oh, DH is also onboard for switching to raw milk.

 

I personally suspect that the theory that the bacteria in our mouths are transferred (and thus, in a strange way, cavities might be sort of "contagious" - though that's simplifying of course) is a big factor. So I think our jobs are to help strengthen DD's immune system and body overall (and believe me, cavities are only part of the story, there's more). I don't know if we can heal any cavities, but I do hope to at least prevent them in the future, or at the very least, reduce new ones. This dentist we'll see believes it's possible to heal cavities, though in practice it probably happens only rarely, but at least he's a guy we can trust on that account. Let's say he looks at DD and says, yes, there's 10 cavities but 3 do not need to be drilled. But we need to watch them, and here's my recommendations for trying to heal them. So if we come back in 3 months or whatever, he'll look, and he'll actually tell us if there's any improvement, or at least if we've arrested the decay. Most dentists would probably laugh at us, or just look and say nope, gotta drill.

 

Sorry for the disjointed post.

post #27 of 52

So glad to hear! 

 

Go raw milk!  I drank a ton when pregnant and I maybe have a swig a day now.  I am grain free as well. 

 

I wanted to add a chart that my ol boss used to pass out to new patients.  Completely makes sense. 

 

http://www.naturalworldhealing.com/Dentalinfo/toothorganchart.htm

 

Can't remember if I posted this link either.... been chatting in 2 forums about holistic DDS's.

 

http://www.iaomt.org/

post #28 of 52
Thread Starter 

The holistic dentist has that chart! I had been telling him my knee had been hurting right around the same time my teeth were also inflamed. He showed me on the chart how one of the 3 inflamed teeth was associated with whichever knee it was (I already forgot right or left).

 

I had some cavities fixed up but not all (due to it being really tight money-wise). Last week both my knees started flaring up at the same time my mouth did. This has happened periodically (about every 2 years give or take) for decades.

 

Can't go to the dentist myself though... DD takes priority by far and this is going to drain our savings as it is. I hate that I can't prioritize my dental health, but I have to pay the mortgage first, and put good food on the table first, and so on. Sigh.

post #29 of 52

I know that adult teeth are very different from baby teeth on decay.  Apparently baby teeth can decay a lot faster.  
Don't feel bad mama - we have never had any issues and my son needs 5 fillings and two crowns.  I cried and fretted and  I felt like a terrible mother too but I have come to accept and now I know that I have to be uber vigilant.  We have started to use fluoride toothpaste althought we eat TF etc...  

 

Oh and btw we drink Raw Milk, eat healthy, dont have junk food or cany etc...  sometimes it is just a predisposition. 

 

With my son they are just doing laughing gas - 3 separate procedures unless he does great and they can do it in two.  They say that the gas is enough for the vast majority of the patients.  They have tvs and the staff is awesome so I feel very secure on the fact that he will be ok and not traumatized.  He's excited that he can take his own movie to watch. 

post #30 of 52
Hugs mama! It is so hard when you try to do right and your kid gets decay. My dd's teeth are looking great and cavities healed but she only had 3 to deal with. If more of it was worse, I would think of dental work for her. It depends. Interesting how her gluten and dairy allergy was what made her inflamed and she got worse cavities after adding more in. She is GF but not grain free. I am the only one who is grain free in the house. Hope it goes well!
post #31 of 52

Try not to feel bad about the situation!  I am one of those moms with one child who has had TONS of teeth problems, and another without ANY cavities!  People are just different, children are no exception.

 

Our regular dentist found our dd's cavities, and referred us to one pediatric dentist who insisted on general anesthesia --- which would cost $5,000 or something absurd like that!

 

We got a second opinion.  And we waited.  We simply didn't want to spend that amount of money.  It seemed so excessive.  This was 2 years ago.  She got some of her teeth treated with just mild numbing to the gums.  It worked fine, she has never had any fears of the dentist.

 

Now she is 5 years-going on six.  She has developed new cavities (yikes!), but we are going to a different pediatric dentist who is going to treat them in a more normal way (that means, not GA!).  We are actually in the midst of this treatment now.  She has another appointment in 2 weeks.  My suggestion is just to look around for other dentists, and other options. 

 

 

post #32 of 52
I have a 5-year old who was found to have "4 cavities" and the dentist referred her to a pediatric dentist to do one tooth as a stainless steel cap. This was the tooth that was almost completely eroded. It couldn't be saved, but I could only see a small erosion on one of the other teeth, and nothing on the remaining two. After strapping her to a papoose board and hooking her up to the gas, the dentist came in and proceeded to completely traumatize my little girl. (She was only 4 at the time.) First they said I'd have to wait outside, to which I completely refused. Then they said I couldn't be near her to comfort her, I had to stay at the back of the room. After that, she naturally started to get upset, and when they started the procedure she started squirming and trying to move her head. Next thing I know, the dentist (supposedly this well-respected pediatric specialist) abruptly went from calm and soothing to commanding and scary - he got right in my daughter's line of sight and yelled, "STOP MOVING! You will have to hold still or this is going to HURT YOU!" I freaked out and nearly shouldered the assistant out of the way to get to my daughter, who immediately began to scream around the mouth guard. Ignoring the dentist, I put my hands on her temples and began to gently stroke and talk quietly into her ear, reassuring her and keeping myself from snatching the nearest heavy instrument to smack the dentist with. He made this disgusted sound because I was there but was able to finish quickly. Then he threw down his instrument, ripped his mask off and tossed it down, and said I'd have to schedule a hospital visit for the remaining three teeth, he wouldn't touch her unless she was under general anesthesia.

O. M. G.

The nurse thanked me repeatedly for helping hold my DD still, but never apologized for the dentist. She must have been used to that kind of behavior. I took my DD to a different dentist for a follow-up and was told that only one more cap would be needed, which they could do right there with no papoose board, and the other two spots on her teeth were way too small to worry about. But the first dentist was going to yank all those teeth!

She was obviously terrified before the next procedure but the staff was amazing. They sang to her, danced toys above her eyes, told jokes and let me stay right there to hold her hand. It helped that she wasn't strapped down either.

Just about a month ago, one of those "spots" was discovered to have eroded enough to require another cap. This was yet another dentist, but they were as amazing as the 2nd. No restraint, only a little gas, and the dentist made silly noises and told stories to her about her "princess" tooth he was giving her.

Personally, I am terrified of dentists due to a very traumatic procedure done when I was 18. I have to say, though, I am glad my daughter seems to have been reassured after that first terrifying event. She did cry when they tried to clean her teeth last time, but eventually relaxed and let them do it for her.

Both of my boys have perfect teeth (well, in comparison). No fillings, anyway. My son's got a few issues not related to decay and will eventually need braces but he's great at the dentist. Way better than me!! I got my first two fillings ever last year and I was a trembling, retching nervous wreck before the procedure!
post #33 of 52

Wow, I cannot believe some of these stories! I take my kids to the Ped dentist. They're awesome with the kids - cartoons, toys, treats, huge fish tank, and lots of time taken to explain what everything is. I wish it was more holistic, but I'm super happy with the atmosphere. My 4 year old had one small cavity. She's a wimp to begin with, so I knew she would not be happy. It took 3 of us to hold her down, and the dentist did her thing, while talking calmly to her and trying to explain what was happning. I held her hands, there was a dental assistant who held her head, and one had to come in a lay over her and whispered softly in her ear. She still freaked out, but they were done quickly and gave her a popsicle when she was done. She's been for a check-up since, and had no issues with being back at the Dentist. In fact, she often asks when she can go back!

 

post #34 of 52



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SeekingSerenity View Post

I have a 5-year old who was found to have "4 cavities" and the dentist referred her to a pediatric dentist to do one tooth as a stainless steel cap. This was the tooth that was almost completely eroded. It couldn't be saved, but I could only see a small erosion on one of the other teeth, and nothing on the remaining two. After strapping her to a papoose board and hooking her up to the gas, the dentist came in and proceeded to completely traumatize my little girl. (She was only 4 at the time.) First they said I'd have to wait outside, to which I completely refused. Then they said I couldn't be near her to comfort her, I had to stay at the back of the room. After that, she naturally started to get upset, and when they started the procedure she started squirming and trying to move her head. Next thing I know, the dentist (supposedly this well-respected pediatric specialist) abruptly went from calm and soothing to commanding and scary - he got right in my daughter's line of sight and yelled, "STOP MOVING! You will have to hold still or this is going to HURT YOU!" I freaked out and nearly shouldered the assistant out of the way to get to my daughter, who immediately began to scream around the mouth guard. Ignoring the dentist, I put my hands on her temples and began to gently stroke and talk quietly into her ear, reassuring her and keeping myself from snatching the nearest heavy instrument to smack the dentist with. He made this disgusted sound because I was there but was able to finish quickly. Then he threw down his instrument, ripped his mask off and tossed it down, and said I'd have to schedule a hospital visit for the remaining three teeth, he wouldn't touch her unless she was under general anesthesia.

O. M. G.

The nurse thanked me repeatedly for helping hold my DD still, but never apologized for the dentist. She must have been used to that kind of behavior. I took my DD to a different dentist for a follow-up and was told that only one more cap would be needed, which they could do right there with no papoose board, and the other two spots on her teeth were way too small to worry about. But the first dentist was going to yank all those teeth!

She was obviously terrified before the next procedure but the staff was amazing. They sang to her, danced toys above her eyes, told jokes and let me stay right there to hold her hand. It helped that she wasn't strapped down either.

Just about a month ago, one of those "spots" was discovered to have eroded enough to require another cap. This was yet another dentist, but they were as amazing as the 2nd. No restraint, only a little gas, and the dentist made silly noises and told stories to her about her "princess" tooth he was giving her.

Personally, I am terrified of dentists due to a very traumatic procedure done when I was 18. I have to say, though, I am glad my daughter seems to have been reassured after that first terrifying event. She did cry when they tried to clean her teeth last time, but eventually relaxed and let them do it for her.

Both of my boys have perfect teeth (well, in comparison). No fillings, anyway. My son's got a few issues not related to decay and will eventually need braces but he's great at the dentist. Way better than me!! I got my first two fillings ever last year and I was a trembling, retching nervous wreck before the procedure!


After a similar experience with my son--the freaking out while "sedated" for dental treatment--I insisted that any more dental treatments he gets will be done under general anesthesia.  Check with your medical insurance--there may be a clause in which the anesthesia is covered (ours was due to our son's disability-autism; and it is also covered for kids under a certain age) if you end up deciding to go that route.  Our biggest issue was finding a dentist that we could afford (read, does amalgams, since insurance will cover those 80% and composites 0%--not even 80% of the amalgam price and we pay the difference x 8 teeth).  We took him to the local university--they used silver caps on his teeth.  He went in and an hour later was out, a bit woozy, but aware and eating a popsicle and once he could walk on his own, we could leave.  If you are in Washington, the University of Washington school of dentistry and Seattle Children's has a program for "low income"-read: under $8000 per month income--to cover any procedure at 100% after what your insurance covers.  You could check your local area for a similar financial need program, if you qualify.  Had there not been that program, I discovered that we had been looking at over $12,000 out of pocket. 
 

 

post #35 of 52

Oh man, I'm so glad to see I'm not the only one in this situation! My seven-year-old twins have perfect teeth with no problems ever, but I took my five-year-old to the dentist today and found out he has four cavities. I have periodically gotten cavities since I was a child. Even now as an adult following a TF diet and always being compliment by the dentist on how very clean my teeth are, I still have had a cavity in recent years. My DH, on the other hand, is the only one in our family who eats junk food and drinks soda every day and has never had one cavity. Clearly my poor DS is taking after me. I mentioned something on facebook about it obviously being at least partially genetic, and a dental hygienist friend of mine replied that that was wrong, and that it has to do only with how you care for your teeth and whether or not you eat junk. Well excuse me, but my son's teeth are well cared for, and he eats almost NO junk ever! I was pretty upset at the fact that she was implying that it's my fault for not caring for his teeth properly. Ugh! Anyway, I'm going to look into some of the advice that I've read in this thread--maybe go for a second opinion, especially if I can find a more holistic dentist in the area. Thanks!

post #36 of 52
post #37 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzybaby9 View Post

http://www.curetoothdecay.com/baby_bottle_tooth_decay.htm

 

Buy the book.



okay, i just have to chime in here. that website is all about buying the book and the author uses an atrocious example of why the bacteria in our mouths aren't capable of causing cavities by comparing it to meat being unrefrigerated or sugar being unrefrigerated and how the meat rots (due to bacteria) and the sugar doesn't.

 

that sort of comparison is so scientifically invalid that it boggles my mind. controls? variables? it's not even inoculated with the bacteria that he is supposedly talking about!

 

if you use pubmed or google schoolar you can see that there are a huge number of results for studies that do study the bacteria in very specific conditions to try to increase understanding about the process.

 

i would highly recommend not buying the book but instead pursuing treatment along with dietary changes. good luck!

 

 

 

post #38 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlayaMama View Post





okay, i just have to chime in here. that website is all about buying the book and the author uses an atrocious example of why the bacteria in our mouths aren't capable of causing cavities by comparing it to meat being unrefrigerated or sugar being unrefrigerated and how the meat rots (due to bacteria) and the sugar doesn't.

 

that sort of comparison is so scientifically invalid that it boggles my mind. controls? variables? it's not even inoculated with the bacteria that he is supposedly talking about!

 

if you use pubmed or google schoolar you can see that there are a huge number of results for studies that do study the bacteria in very specific conditions to try to increase understanding about the process.

 

i would highly recommend not buying the book but instead pursuing treatment along with dietary changes. good luck!

 

 

 


You've visited the website, but haven't read the book. Am I right?

 

"Pursuing treatment along with dietary changes"- of course. The book outlines many dietary changes. That's why I recommended it.

 

post #39 of 52

Oops.


Edited by smilingsara - 4/14/11 at 7:57am
post #40 of 52

 

Your DD is 5?  My 5 year old has had numerous fillings and my 8 year old has had even more.  My 5 year old was 3 before I could talk my regular dentist into seeing her.  My kids are more cooperative than most adults so YMMV but they have had all their fillings while awake.  My son was put under GA at 31 months for 4 extractions that we opted for rather than caps (front teeth).  We are now dealing with some side effects from him not having teeth for 5 years.  He was awake for his last extraction.  They have had novicane (or whatever) for back teeth and none for front teeth.  My little girl saw a pediatric dentist at age 2 for fillings in her 4 front teeth.  She sat on my lap and calmly held her mouth open for 45 minutes while they placed "strip crowns."  I took her to my dentist when the strip crowns failed (all of them).  

 

So, we have awful teeth.  I don't have any advice there.  I trust my dentist.  I frequently take my kids in when I see spots and he says they're nothing to worry about yet.  Anyway, when we need lots of fillings, we schedule slightly longer appointments every week until they're done.  We might go weekly for a month.  *shrug*  My kids are used to it since we have to go through it every 6 months.

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