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Tragedy for a family and a midwife

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

http://www.myfoxdc.com/dpp/news/local/midwife-charged-in-virginia-with-involuntary-manslaughter-041911

 

A breech vaginal delivery where the baby's head was stuck.  Baby passed. Midwife charged with involuntary manslaughter.

 

I wish there was more detail.  How awful for the family and the midwife.  Seems crazy to me, to charge the midwife, but I guess there might be more to it.... My heart goes out to Ms. Carr and the family that lost their baby.

post #2 of 10

candle.gif For all involved in the tragedy.  How sad for everyone, my heart hurts for them.

 

 

I have nothing profound to add.  Just couldn't read and not post.

post #3 of 10

How very tragic. I am so sorry for that poor family.

post #4 of 10
post #5 of 10

Karen Carr assisted at my younger son's homebirth. She's an amazing, experienced, talented, and kind midwife, and is a very important part of the natural birth community in my area. There is a group that is raising money for her defense fund. This case is so tragic for many reasons. I expect that more details will emerge at  the trial.

post #6 of 10

This is awful on so many levels :(

 

 

candle.gif

post #7 of 10

 I think in most cases they feel that a midwife should have known there were *issues* that require a transfer to a hospital. Every case I have read the parents always say," The midwife should have known and transfered us."

post #8 of 10

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattemma04 View Post

 I think in most cases they feel that a midwife should have known there were *issues* that require a transfer to a hospital. Every case I have read the parents always say," The midwife should have known and transfered us."


Personally, I feel this is the largest stumbling block for many people when considering a homebirth.  When we decided to embrace a homebirth, I had to make peace with the idea that sometimes horrible things just happen that you can't do anything about.  Now, statistically, you're safer birthing at home, but if the SHTF, there is a lot of comfort in *not taking responsibility* for a poor outcome.  And that is something that a high intervention hospital can protect you from.  If the worst happens, then it most people will feel like they did everything they can.  If the horror visits your home, meanwhile, IMO to be a good homebirth candidate you need to be able to say that bad things happen.  Of course, people are very bad at statistical analysis especial when the ver rare possible outcome is so horrid.

post #9 of 10

I have no words. This is just terrible. My heart hurts for all who are involved. candle.gif

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiredX2 View Post

 


Personally, I feel this is the largest stumbling block for many people when considering a homebirth.  When we decided to embrace a homebirth, I had to make peace with the idea that sometimes horrible things just happen that you can't do anything about.  Now, statistically, you're safer birthing at home, but if the SHTF, there is a lot of comfort in *not taking responsibility* for a poor outcome.  And that is something that a high intervention hospital can protect you from.  If the worst happens, then it most people will feel like they did everything they can.  If the horror visits your home, meanwhile, IMO to be a good homebirth candidate you need to be able to say that bad things happen.  Of course, people are very bad at statistical analysis especial when the ver rare possible outcome is so horrid.

 

Exactly!

I walked into my homebirth with my eyes wide open. I knew that I had a really good chance of ending up with another shoulder dystocia issue, since it happened with my first. I was willing to take responsibility for the birth and the outcome. I chose a midwife who had experience with resolving shoulder dystocias, and who I could trust to intervene only when necessary. I knew what would happen if I chose to birth in a hospital (induction due to measuring large, leading to further interventions, or freaking out and mismanaging the shoulder dystocia, and probably ending up with a dead baby). I knew what would happen if I chose to birth at a birth center, since I did that the first time (wonderful midwife, but still wasn't thrilled with the fear in his eyes and voice when faced with the shoulder dystocia).  I wanted someone who would respect me and my right to choose my birth, and who I could trust. That's what I found in Karen. I had a scary birth. The shoulder dystocia was severe and he wasn't breathing when he was born. But, she stayed calm and collected and respectful and communicative, and everything turned out fine. I had accepted that it might not, but I was glad and relieved that it did.

 

I don't understand anyone who walks into a homebirth without being ready and willing to own that birth, to take full responsibility for that experience. That is so much the point of homebirth to me.

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