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post #161 of 296

Jbk21-- some people have luck with icecream. My diabetes educator said it's because of the fat and some protein in it slows the digestion.  If you check the boxes, some have 15 carbs for 1/2 a cup. If you are looking for baked goods you get into artificial sweeteners.

 

I also use Diabetic Living magazine. They use more whole foods/smaller portions than I've seen with many diabetes magazines. They have a lot of desserts, though many are 30 carbs, and I try to keep it 15.

 

 

 


Edited by Flor - 9/18/11 at 5:41pm
post #162 of 296

Hi all,

 

I have a question for you ladies.  I'm about 15 weeks pregnant (2nd pregnancy) and kind of feeling crappy about food.  I had pretty bad morning sickness for the first 13 weeks and then it was like a light swithced.  Now I'm getting the sugar high feeling (like I ate 3 pieces of cake) about an hour after eating and the sugar low feeling (shaky) about 2-2.5 hours after eating.  Its a little better when I eat protein with every meal.  I've already cut out almost all refined stuff and cut way back on fruit and carbs (I'd estimate it at about 30g per meal or snack).  I'm eating every 2.5 hours.  In other words, I'm doing a modified GD diet even though my regular diet would be considered pretty healthy in most homes.  But even then, I'm still feeling like I'm barely getting by.

 

Technically, I don't have a lot of risk factors as I started the pregnancy only slightly overweight, I'm barely 30, no family history, was not GD for my last pregnancy, gained only 25 lbs last preg, delivered a skinny 8.5 lber 21inches at 41 wks.  However, I obviously wasn't handling sugar well during my last pregnancy as I had a 135 for the 1hour and 78, 205 (!!!.... nearly passed out and had to lay down in a dark room for the rest of the test), 138, and 111 for the 3hour.  I was so sick after the 3hour, I swore never again. The practice I was at didn't slap a GD label on me but gave me a stern talking to about no fruits, no soda/juice, no refined sugar/grains, etc. 

 

So, my question is.... given how crappy I'm feeling, do I request a GD screen early?  How early?  Or do I just wait for the standard 24 wk screen?  I'm at a different practice (hospital based CNM - Kaiser Oregon), so they don't know the details of my last pregnancy and I have no idea what their cut offs/ delivery policies are going to be.  I'm particularly concerned about an induction issue as I fully expect to go to 41 weeks (my mom and sisters all do too).  But if I'm just putting off the inevitable, well maybe that's not so great either.

post #163 of 296
Thread Starter 

Could you possibly get your hands on a monitor & do some self-monitoring first? If you were to request to screen early they would likely have you screen again at the typical time unless you fail the first one. Switching to a gd diet (remembering that what that entails can be different for every body) early is certainly not a bad things in terms of health for yourself & your baby.

post #164 of 296

I agree it is a good idea to test yourself for a while and see what your numbers are. A lot of us have few/no risk factors and eat very healthy-- it isn't our fault, it just happens! If you do have GD I think it is important to find out as soon as necessasry even if it does mean an induction. My ONE big goal for this pregnancy was no induction, and I've had to give that up, I know I'll have one (I also have a kidney issue), but not everyone does.

post #165 of 296

OKAY- here is a collection of recipes and ideas for low carb "treats" (this is my second GD pregnancy, and I switched to a moderate/low carb diet after my first GD pregnancy)

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbk21 View Post

Care to share those coconut flour recipes?!?!  

 

Anyone else have any ideas for low-carb desserts?  I'm dying without... well, and I have a few things coming up where I'd like to eat dessert (baby shower, hubby's bday, wedding anniversary....)  
 

 

-Girl Gone Primal blog has some good whole foods-based low-carb desserts: chocolate zucchini muffins, coconut-almond biscuits, chocolate cake with whipped cream and berries. I also like her seed crackers.

-Marks Daily Apple had a clafouti recipe for chicken that I modified and did with some fruit- not SUPER low carb but very tasty, I don't eat meat but lots of meaty stuff on there too.

-Nourishing Days blog has a good "fluffy coconut flour pancakes" recipe (v low carb if you make with coconut milk or buttermilk, and I eat them with plain whipped cream or plain yogurt with some stevia and vanilla mixed in) and some ideas for making cream/ice/mint smoothies that are tasty

-If you can find the coconut milk ice creams (So Delicious makes one, also Larry and Lunas... forget the brand). If you subtract the fiber they have about 16g carbs per servings for some flavors- not bad. You can make a really easy chocolate "shell" by melting equal parts unsweet chocolate and coconut oil and then sweetening to taste with your preferred sweetner.

 

And here are some recipies I've gathered and modified off of various blogs/books/friends:

WAFFLES= very good

3 or 4 eggs, separated

1 can coconut milk

2 tbl wheat flour and 2 tbl coconut flour OR 1/2 cup almond meal

1 c shredded coconut

1 tsp baking powder

-whip egg whites, mix all others, fold in whites. Don't use indicator light, instead, cook until steam stops coming out.

 

COCONUT BLUEBERRY MUFFINS

1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons coconut flour

3 eggs

1/2 teaspoon vanilla

2 tablespoons melted coconut oil/butter

5 tbls buttermilk (or unsweetened coconut milk, cream, or milk)

1 tablespoon agave

15 drops stevia extract

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 cup frozen blueberries

1/3 cup chopped pecans

Whisk eggs, oil, milk, agave, stevia, salt and vanilla. Stir coconut flour and baking powder into the batter and mix until there are no lumps. Fold in frozen blueberries and nuts, stirring gently. Spoon batter into greased muffin tin. Bake at 400 F for 15-18 minutes. Makes 6 muffins.

 

LEMON POPPYSEED COCONUT FLOUR MUFFINS (modified from Elanas Pantry blog)

1/4 c coconut flour

1/4 c oil (melted butter or melted coconut, or liquid oil)

1/4 c liquid- I used 20drops stevia, 1-2 tbl agave, rest buttermilk.

1/2 tsp baking powder

pinch salt

3 eggs

1 tbl poppyseeds

grated rind of 2 lemons (or oranges, or a mix)

same method as above. Very nice!

 

CHEESE BISCUITS

4 eggs..                          

1⁄4 c butter, melted           

1⁄4 teaspoon salt                 

other seasonings (onion powder suggested, I used paprika and pepper, herbs probably would be nice)

1/3 c coconut flour       

1⁄4 sp baking powder

1⁄2 c cheddar cheese, shredded (or more, or other kinds of cheese)

whisk batter until there are no lumps. Stir in cheese. Drop batter by the spoonful onto greased cookie sheet. Bake at 400 degrees F (205 C) for 15 minutes. Makes 8 biscuits.

 

COCONUT FLOUR BREAD

6 eggs

1/2 cup melted coconut oil

1-2 tablespoons honey (optional, I usually leave it out)

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

3/4 cup coconut flour

Mix all ingredients together and pour into a small buttered loaf pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 40 minutes. Turn the loaf out and cool completely on a rack before serving. That’s it! Enjoy.

 

HIGH PROTEIN PANCAKES

4-6 eggs

1lbs cottage cheese

scant 1/4 c rolled oats

2 tbl coconut flour

nice to add a little vanilla

Blend all in a blender/food processor until smooth. Cook in plenty of butter. Serve with plain yogurt sweetened with stevia and with vanilla and cinnamon for flavor.

 

LOW CARB "CANDY"

3 tbl PB (or other nut/seed butter)

3 tbl coconut oil

unsweetened chocolate

2 tsp vanilla, cinnamon

sweetner to taste: I use a mix of xylitol, stevia and a little agave

melt and combine

spoon into muffin tins (I use minis) over unsweetened shredded coconut or chopped nuts

freeze until solid, "pop" out with a blunt butter knife. Keep cold.

 

ALMOND MILK

soak 1generous cup of raw almonds

blend in blender/food processor, slowly adding 4c water

strain through a fine mesh strainer. this part is the most annoying- press out as much liquid as you can

stir in a pinch of salt, vanilla, cinnamon and sweeten to taste- as above I use a mix of xylitol, stevia and a squidge of "real" sweetner (honey/maple syrup/agave... like 1 tbl)

keep cold, shake before serving.


Edited by emmaegbert - 9/20/11 at 8:02am
post #166 of 296

yikes that is a long post... I'm not so active on this thread (our DDC actually has a nice active group that I check more often) but I hope this helps someone on here and you asked! And now I have thought of more:

 

one other dessert we like a lot (sounds gross, tastes GREAT! This is really filing and satisfying and does NOTHING to my blood sugar, and its creamy and delicious)

TOFU CHOCOLATE PUDDING (and the bonus pie version, very nice for a celebration)

blend 1 carton silken tofu (like the shelf-stable kind), with melted unsweet chocolate, vanilla (cinnamon if desired, I like it with chocolate), sweetener combo of your choice to taste, pinch salt

spoon into pudding cups, spread plain or lightly sweetened whipped cream on top, let it set in the fridge. (much, much better a few hours later- you might taste it and think, ew, what is she talking about this isn't so good. But its really tasty when its cold and set up).

we also make a pie with that- I blend coconut and nuts (usually a mix of almonds and cashews) and some coconut flour (totally optional), with some xylitol and cinnamon, then press that into a pie plate and toast in the oven, then make the pudding and spread that in there, topped with cream.

 

AVOCADO CHOCOLATE PUDDING

just google this but basically... very ripe avocado blended with chocolate or cocoa and sweetener to taste, topped with whipped cream.

 

 

post #167 of 296

Oh... and I am a vegetarian too. It definitely makes it more challenging/limiting. I eat a LOT of eggs, cheese, PB, nuts, and plain yogurt. Hummus is fine for me (chick peas, not). More soy that I probably would otherwise, but I try to keep that moderate. Tofu, tempeh, and soy "meats" a couple of times a week.

 

Beans and lentils and such are a food I have to be careful with. Small amounts seem okay but a meal with a ton of them can spike me too high. Quinoa as well. For canned beans, Eden makes a black soy that is much lower in carb (and costs more of course). Pinto beans are lower in carb/higher in fiber than some others. Supposedly sprouting before cooking helps- I do it with lentils but not sure how much difference it makes.

 

If you don't have problems with gluten, that is an excellent protein source and super high in protein. Seitan is easy to make and cheap with gluten flour.

 

Grains are no good for me and seriously, they don't have much in the way of protein.

post #168 of 296

Emmaegbert-- do you happen to know the carb count of these treats? I'm fascinated, but I have one of those docs who only allows 15g carb snacks and 30g lunch/dinner, no subtracting fiber, so I keept finding that even diabetic desserts have too many carbs for me! Going to goodle the avo/chocolate thing.

post #169 of 296

Squeel!  I'm making tofu chocolate pudding today!!  I'm so glad you said it doesn't affect your sugar.  I bought a chocolate pudding packet (it's meant to be made with the tofu, the brand is mori-nu mates) so I'm hoping my sugar is okay afterward- the carb count is only 20 so I figure it's an okay snack :)  Great pie crust idea, too!  Yay!  Chocolate pie!  I'm thinking very lightly sweetened homemade whipped cream on top would fool everyone, right?!  They'd never know it was super-low carb :)  Lol.

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by emmaegbert View Post

yikes that is a long post... I'm not so active on this thread (our DDC actually has a nice active group that I check more often) but I hope this helps someone on here and you asked! And now I have thought of more:

 

one other dessert we like a lot (sounds gross, tastes GREAT! This is really filing and satisfying and does NOTHING to my blood sugar, and its creamy and delicious)

TOFU CHOCOLATE PUDDING (and the bonus pie version, very nice for a celebration)

blend 1 carton silken tofu (like the shelf-stable kind), with melted unsweet chocolate, vanilla (cinnamon if desired, I like it with chocolate), sweetener combo of your choice to taste, pinch salt

spoon into pudding cups, spread plain or lightly sweetened whipped cream on top, let it set in the fridge. (much, much better a few hours later- you might taste it and think, ew, what is she talking about this isn't so good. But its really tasty when its cold and set up).

we also make a pie with that- I blend coconut and nuts (usually a mix of almonds and cashews) and some coconut flour (totally optional), with some xylitol and cinnamon, then press that into a pie plate and toast in the oven, then make the pudding and spread that in there, topped with cream.

 

AVOCADO CHOCOLATE PUDDING

just google this but basically... very ripe avocado blended with chocolate or cocoa and sweetener to taste, topped with whipped cream.

 

 



 

post #170 of 296


I'm veg too!  It's definitely SO hard to think of meal options.  I walked through Whole Foods yesterday and much to my dismay I just kept saying, well I can skip basically this entire aisle, oh and this one too... and this one.. It eliminates over half the store, I think!  I eat a lot of eggs and cheese too, which makes me feel like I'm going to blow up like a balloon but I guess I'm eating TONS of veggies too, so that balances out the fat and calories.  I'm interested to see what my weight gain is at my appt tomorrow now that I've been on the  GD diet for a few weeks.  

 

Mmmm I love seitan, by the way.  Field roast is made with gluten instead of soy, and they have really great faux-meat products.  Pricey, but they're good in a pinch :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by emmaegbert View Post

Oh... and I am a vegetarian too. It definitely makes it more challenging/limiting. I eat a LOT of eggs, cheese, PB, nuts, and plain yogurt. Hummus is fine for me (chick peas, not). More soy that I probably would otherwise, but I try to keep that moderate. Tofu, tempeh, and soy "meats" a couple of times a week.

 

Beans and lentils and such are a food I have to be careful with. Small amounts seem okay but a meal with a ton of them can spike me too high. Quinoa as well. For canned beans, Eden makes a black soy that is much lower in carb (and costs more of course). Pinto beans are lower in carb/higher in fiber than some others. Supposedly sprouting before cooking helps- I do it with lentils but not sure how much difference it makes.

 

If you don't have problems with gluten, that is an excellent protein source and super high in protein. Seitan is easy to make and cheap with gluten flour.

 

Grains are no good for me and seriously, they don't have much in the way of protein.



 

post #171 of 296

I feel the same way at the grocery store. More than half the aisles are full of things I can't have: cereal, bread, chips, pasta, rice. I spend most of my time loading my cart up with dairy and meat. Which feels SO unhealthy. But my RN keeps gushing over my food log and at what a great diet I'm keeping. So...I guess it's not as bad as it seems.


On another note: anybody know if there is any truth to the idea that insulin resistance with GD tends to peak at around 34 weeks?? I'll be 33 weeks tomorrow and I'm definitely feeling like I'm peaking. My numbers had been consistent until about a week and a half ago when I started having random high days. Since then, things have been a bit more unpredictable. But I've got this big happy face drawn on my calendar for the end of the month for when I should be hitting the worst of it and can start hoping that things might start getting easier.

 

post #172 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thesan83 View Post

I feel the same way at the grocery store. More than half the aisles are full of things I can't have: cereal, bread, chips, pasta, rice. I spend most of my time loading my cart up with dairy and meat. Which feels SO unhealthy. But my RN keeps gushing over my food log and at what a great diet I'm keeping. So...I guess it's not as bad as it seems.


On another note: anybody know if there is any truth to the idea that insulin resistance with GD tends to peak at around 34 weeks?? I'll be 33 weeks tomorrow and I'm definitely feeling like I'm peaking. My numbers had been consistent until about a week and a half ago when I started having random high days. Since then, things have been a bit more unpredictable. But I've got this big happy face drawn on my calendar for the end of the month for when I should be hitting the worst of it and can start hoping that things might start getting easier.

 

 

 

I haven't heard that, but that would certainly be nice!  Hoping someone will confirm it....

 


I have been having trouble getting my prescription filled for my test strips.  My MW couldn't write the script (she is out of town) and there wasn't a CNM available so I just told them I could have my PCP write it if they'd fax him the info.  So of course I had to go to MWs office to sign a records release form, then go to PCP to pick up script, then go to pharmacy where then they told me that I could only get 50 strips for one month at a time b/c my PCP wrote "test one or two times a day" instead of THREE or FOUR times a day.  My insurance won't cover more than one month at a time, so the pharmacy faxed my PCP to get a new script.  I'm waiting to hear from the pharmacy that it's a go, but I've been out of strips for 2 days now!  This is SO annoying.  I'd just bite it and buy the darn things but they are (as you all know) so EXPENSIVE!!  YEESH.  Why does this have to be so difficult?!  duh.gif
 

 

post #173 of 296

you can enter all the ingredients at the livestrong website or you can do it in excel (if you know how to use excel, you can just set up a calculation that adds all your columns and then divides it by number of servings). Below is an example of the one I bothered to do... but I found it too laborious and not relevant b/c my blood sugar readings have mostly been good.

 

my MWs this time and last are very much of the attitude that the meter is what matters, as long as my 1-hour post-prandial is good, thats fine. And if its not, it doesn't really matter what the carb count was, right? I don't eat that food or that serving size again. I am not on insulin so maybe that is part of it (but there is really NO SENSE in not subtracting fiber- I'd argue on that point. Fiber does not convert to glucose, it remains undigested).

 

from what I've seen, "diabetic desserts" can be very carb heavy, for some crazy reason there is not a widely held understanding of the benefits of low carb for diabetics. Like, "sugar free" ice cream can have as many-- if not more-- carbs than regular ice cream (vanilla haagen daaz is 20g carbs in a half a cup. So according to your doctor, you could have a really low-carb lunch and a half a cup of vanilla ice cream. yum. Oh, except if you ate a big salad, they would nonsensically count the fiber in your lettuce as carbs...)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flor View Post

Emmaegbert-- do you happen to know the carb count of these treats? I'm fascinated, but I have one of those docs who only allows 15g carb snacks and 30g lunch/dinner, no subtracting fiber, so I keept finding that even diabetic desserts have too many carbs for me! Going to goodle the avo/chocolate thing.


Coconut-chocolate-PB "candy" calculation. I didn't include vanilla, cinnamon, or stevia on the incredient list b/c they have no carbs/sugars in them, at least seriously, not enough to matter.

 

coconut oil chocolate "candies"        
  cal fat carb fiber protien
coconut oil, 3 tbl 390 42 0   0
dry coconut, 4 tbl 147 13.3 5 2.5 1.3
peanut butter, 2 tbl 200 15 7 2 9
almond flour, 1 tbl 45 3.75 1.25 7.5 1.5
unsweet chocolate, 1 oz 180 15 7 5 3
xylitol, 1 package 9.6 0 4    
agave, 1 tsp 20 0 5.3 0 0
           
total 991.6 89.05 29.55 17 14.8
per serving (2 mini) 99.16 8.905 2.955 1.7 1.48
  cal fat carb fiber protien

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

           
           

 

post #174 of 296

so far... at 35 weeks I am seeing higher numbers than before. I think it varies depending on the person (and which placental hormones you are particularly sensitive to). I do hear that most people are dropping by the time they are full term.

as for all the calories and fat. I lost weight with my first pregnancy when I switched to a grain-free, sugar-free, moderately-low-carb diet. For a month. I had to consciously eat a lot of fat to keep from losing more weight. I then went back on a similar diet (minus all the snacks and spreading food out so much) at 8m post-partum and lost about 35 pounds in 9 months. Anyway, this time I am just planning to stay on it (a little less strict) after the baby is born and hopefully I will lose the baby weight gradually but immediately (both previous pregnancies, despite large babies who were EBF, I weighed literally about 5lbs less at my 6w PP visit than I had fully pregnant). There is some really good info out there as to why lower carb diets work for (some) people and do not cause weight gain. BUT, that is not so relevant to here. But if you go looking for it, lots of info about why the phobia of dietary fat is not backed up by clinical research. The idea of "calories in, calories out" doesn't take into account that food for an animal is not the same as fuel for a machine.

post #175 of 296

Thanks for all the info, Emmaegbert!

 

I have a question about ketones- I had +++ ketones in my urinalysis today at my midwife appointment.  They were not at all concerned but I've read some stuff online that makes it seem like I am not getting enough carbs, or am in starvation mode.  It's a controversial issue, it seems, but I'm wondering if you ladies know anything about it.  Should I get some test strips for home use just to see if I consistently have ketones (some docs would say that is a bad thing) or should I just chalk it up as a one-time thing?  

 

 

post #176 of 296

I never tested for ketones and nobody expressed any worries with either pregnancy. I do not, by any means, eat a radically low carb diet (I am still eating small servings of fruit, yogurt, some legumes, etc). I believe you are more likely to be in ketosis when you start the diet, also, if you are dehydrated at all I think more likely to show up in your urine (more concentrated). Fairly small amounts of carbs ought to keep the ketone levels low- I don't think it takes much. But if MWs weren't worried, I would personally take that as reassuring. Obviously do ask them what they think.

 

I think lifeguard has read up on it more and may have something more to say about this.

post #177 of 296
Thread Starter 

jbk - the whole prescription for strips things bothers me to no end. WHO would abuse the system to buy strips they don't need? I just don't get it.

 

I agree with emmaegbert about the carbs thing. In general our culture eats waaaaaay too carb heavy & has a warped sense of how many carbs are healthy/necessary.

 

ketones - yes, a low carb diet can put you into ketosis - the point at which you reach that is different for each person but generally you need to be incredibly low. I was on no carbs at one point in my pregnancy (I am working with a nutritionist so this was not a decision I made out of the blue) & most definitely would have been in ketosis. I read a lot about it but I really could not find anything at all that was substantiated. If you google it you will find some stuff that says it could be bad for the baby but when you come down to it no one knows for sure - it's just a guess. The way I looked at it is some cultures & our ancesters ate VERY low carb, I have a hard time believing we are that different (for example: inuit culture traditionally eats a diet that is very heavy in protein & fat with very little grains or other carbs).

 

I have only ever had ketones tested once in two pregnancies & that was when I went in to the hospital 'cause I was worried about baby's movement - I didn't have ketones which actually surprised me.

 

 

post #178 of 296


Thanks for the info!  I guess if I can increase my carbs just a bit it will make my life easier :)  I just had some tofu chocolate pudding (with veggie soup and a salad for dinner)- it felt nice to have "dessert" and the pudding is SOOOOO good!

 

Seriously, the prescription thing is annoying.  I am glad I saved over 100 dollars because my insurance covered the script (except a copay) but I don't understand why they wouldn't just trust me that I need to test 3-4 times a day instead of 1-2 like my PCP wrote on the script.  Like, what am I going to do with these strips that could be even remotely harmful?  But of course they wouldn't do it and I needed to wait and thus missed 2 days' worth of testing.  Annoying.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lifeguard View Post

jbk - the whole prescription for strips things bothers me to no end. WHO would abuse the system to buy strips they don't need? I just don't get it.

 

I agree with emmaegbert about the carbs thing. In general our culture eats waaaaaay too carb heavy & has a warped sense of how many carbs are healthy/necessary.

 

ketones - yes, a low carb diet can put you into ketosis - the point at which you reach that is different for each person but generally you need to be incredibly low. I was on no carbs at one point in my pregnancy (I am working with a nutritionist so this was not a decision I made out of the blue) & most definitely would have been in ketosis. I read a lot about it but I really could not find anything at all that was substantiated. If you google it you will find some stuff that says it could be bad for the baby but when you come down to it no one knows for sure - it's just a guess. The way I looked at it is some cultures & our ancesters ate VERY low carb, I have a hard time believing we are that different (for example: inuit culture traditionally eats a diet that is very heavy in protein & fat with very little grains or other carbs).

 

I have only ever had ketones tested once in two pregnancies & that was when I went in to the hospital 'cause I was worried about baby's movement - I didn't have ketones which actually surprised me.

 

 



 

post #179 of 296

Regarding subtracting fiber-- my endo said that it was invented by Atkins and may or may not work for weightloss but is unreliable for diabetics. She says all food will raise your BS-- proteins, fat, too, but we only focus on carbs because they do it so quickly. Fiber may slow the rise of bs in some people but not others. The American Diabetes Association seems to split the difference. it says that if a food has more than 5 g of fiber you can subtract half of it. But, like you said, she also says that if you eat a food and your numbers are fine, then it's fine. I just don't feel like I have much room to experiment, since a couple of high numbers a week means they raise my insulin.

post #180 of 296
Thread Starter 

flor - i think you highlighted exactly why each person has to find what works for their body. Fibre subtraction may work just fine for some but not all. You're right that all foods raise bs but at different rates - the slower rates are less likely to create a peak that is as high & that is why these foods tend to work better for diabetics.

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