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Anyone NOT use sunscreen? Do you really think it's dangerous to our health? - Page 2

post #21 of 85

I am rather fair-skinned with medium-dark brown hair and blue-green eyes (English-Northern Italian-German heritage). Looking back at childhood pictures, I tanned easily. I recall getting a few burns, too. In my early 20s, I burned EASILY. That's when I started using sunscreen and kept it up for about a decade.

 

Interesting to read about the nutrition link because my childhood wasn't exactly healthy, but was healthier than my 20s. I absolutely ate the worst of my life in my 20s. Starting in my late 20s, I slowly began eating healthier and healthier (first step was ditching soda in favor of plain water).

 

Slowly, I stopped wearing sunscreen all over my body and only wore it on my face every single day (mineral-based only, though). Eventually, I stopped even doing that.

 

Nowadays, I rarely wear sunscreen and I don't encourage my DD (10) to do so, either. We do cover up on high exposure days and/or stay inside during the hottest part of the day. We live 20 minutes from the beach and go often. We also have a pool in our HOA and go frequently. There is no shade at either place. We wear rash guards and hats most of the time, but also use mineral-based sunscreen on faces/necks/shoulders under some conditions.

 

Mostly, though, our ordinary days have ample outdoor time and we aim for maximum skin exposure to make vitamin D (no sunscreen, least skin covered up as possible with temperature comfort -- and nudity laws LOL -- in mind). We supplement vitamin D, too. I also walk outside without my glasses (no contacts, either) when I can for natural eye health. Since we walk to/from school every single day -- sometimes I walk to/from school 3 or more times a day -- our bodies have year-round sunlight exposure (year-round school calendar; we were just out for a month).

 

DD has never been sunburned. She tans easily. We walked to/from preschool, too, and that was farther away.

 

One of my biggest challenges regarding this topic is getting people to leave me/DD alone about sunscreen use. Depending on the situation, I gently educate when appropriate. Such as, "I wonder about all the sunscreen use and increase in skin cancer. The two seem to have gone hand-in-hand versus having an inverse relationship, like one would imagine. What do you think?" and then have a conversation about whatever comes up. I like it when the conversation gets around to vitamin D and fortifying milk, cereal, orange juice, etc. because most moms/people seem to take more notice at that point.

 

The school system is particularly vexing, though. There is media (posters/programs/incentives/etc) promoting prolific sunscreen use and parent volunteers are pushing sunscreen like drugs, esp on the playground and jogging track. My DD is becoming more secure in her views on issues like these and is slowly becoming comfortable saying, "No, thank you," to adults. Peer pressure is an interesting mix. With sunscreen, she adapts to the situation and uses her own good judgment most of the time.

 

I got to witness this in action this past weekend when we were on a Girl Scout camping adventure. When she was younger, she followed my lead...looking to me or at me first. Now, however, she decided for herself first and I didn't say a word. I was proud of her for making her own decision and sticking to it. Two days she opted for a hat and short sleeves. One day she opted for sunscreen and a tank top. Her decisions matched the weather more than anything else. We were camping on an island in the middle of a bay with very few shade opportunities during the daytime, so no coverage of any kind was a poor choice for anyone. Some girls/leaders did make that choice and suffered with sunburns.


Edited by sunnysandiegan - 5/3/11 at 9:23am
post #22 of 85
I avoid the sun in general, which is pretty easy to do in Chicago lately! My brother had malignant melanoma at 29. He had one major sunburn as a child. It was a horrible, bubbling burn and he couldn't eat or sleep for days. It happened when he was at summer camp. We are Scottish! Our skin can't take excessive sun exposure. I think ethnic background is the most important factor in skin cancer risk. Also, excessive sun exposure raises your risk for macular degeneration if you have green or blue eyes.
post #23 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by ameliabedelia View Post

naturalnews.com has aritcles or videos on the link between sunburn and nutrition.

 

I also do think a factor may be your genetic heritage.  I think someone with very fair skin whose ansectors are from the far north, needs to be very careful if they are living in southern climate where the sun is stronger.

 

I also think that how your exposure occurs is a factor.  Sun exposure is meant to be gradual, with some exposure occurring each day and your body builds up a gradual tan through the spring so that when the full, strong sun of summer comes it's not a shock.  I think a big problem occurs when people spend all day indoors every day and then go spend 6 hours at the beach on Sat.   In order to be able to spend 6 hours at the beach without burning, one needs to spend some time in the sun each day. This allows your body to build up it's own natural protection ( a tan).

 


yup, welcome to my life...I am very fair skinned with family that is predominantly Irish and german...As a family we don't tan well (I actually golden up nice if I do it gradually)...DD is so fair skinned. I am paranoid about sun exposure because she burns in literally 2 minutes of direct sunlight in the middle of a summer day, even here in New England. I use sun screen on her face, her cheeks can burn easily and I still make her wear a large brimmed hat. We also do the rash guard at the beach or on any water because once again she burns practically immediately. 

 

It is tough, when are at home there is enough shade that we are just conscious of it and stay in the general shady spots. Fortunately our huge deck has varying amounts of shade during the day and we can always move to where it is shadier to get cool if we want.. DH burns immediately too and cannot go without sun screen or he suffers for it. He works outside often NOT in the shade, it's a trade off for him.

 

post #24 of 85


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crunchy_mommy View Post

I'd love to read more about sunburn & poor nutrition... anyone have any studies? It sounds unlikely (because we burn and have great nutrition, and I know people that don't burn and have horrible nutrition or are even malnourished) but maybe we are exceptions or there is one obscure but critical nutrient we are somehow missing out on??

I've also read some stuff lately about the sunburn/skin cancer connection being all hype, so maybe that's something else I should read about.

I know there are natural sunscreens but they still contain titanium or zinc oxides right??? I know that stuff isn't good to breathe in so I can't imagine it's great for your skin but I really know nothing about it TBH!

I'm also kind of worried sunscreen will give us a false sense of security.... But there are times where we just can't avoid being in direct sun for long periods of time... And we do live on the coast but don't spend every day on the beach or anything -- more often we are going for long walks or whatever.

How come people in other countries spend sooo much time outside, yet don't burn??
 



re: the bolded. Could you please provide some links to this information??

post #25 of 85
We take fermented cod liver oil every day, and we have zero reaction to the sun as a result.
No tan or burn at all. And that is just one of the benefits if offers!

ETA prior to taking the oil, I burned severely without sunscreen.
post #26 of 85

It can be hard to figure out how genes fit in, though.  I am white and really pale, and I've always burned easily, til a couple years ago (I live in Texas now, so there's plenty of opportunity to burn). 

 

There are some studies using omega-3 supps to increase the amount of time it takes to burn, but when you factor in: how much omega-6 do you consume in your diet, how much omega-3 do you consume, do you have any unusual sources of oxidative stress which can use up omega-3s a lot faster than average, it can be tricky to figure out how to make an impact on any one individual.  Plus, if your balance is quite off, it can take a couple years after a change in diet to see a change--for me it took almost 2 years after I switched to a high saturated fat diet (really reduced my omega-6s when I moved to a lot more animal fats and coconut oil).  When the change happened, it was quite abrupt and shocking.  Cause really, I was the kid/adult that burned in just a few minutes of sun, and then suddenly, it stopped (meaning I *could* still burn if I stayed out quite a while, but most of my trips to the park, or working out in the yard, didn't result in any pink skin anymore). 

 

There are also a few studies on orange veggies, apparently the beta-carotene that we don't convert to vitamin A helps protect against burning in the sun. 


 

 

 

post #27 of 85

I don't really think that the sunburn/skin cancer connection is "all hype," but I do believe there has been some leaning towards the idea that the benefits that the vitamin D confers upon you may outweigh the risks that a sunburn presents. Also, the chemicals in sunscreen may present some adverse health effects. Just things to weigh in the overall balance. I do think that if you are the type to turn into a lobster, sunscreen probably is a good idea, if for nothing else than your comfort.

post #28 of 85

We don't use sunscreen in our family. I believe that this is right for *our* family because our genetic makeup doesn't predispose us to burning.

 

That's not to say it's impossible....we went to the beach last Friday in the heat of midday, ds and DP strippedoff their shirts and got in the water, and later they complained that their shoulders were itchy, which I took to mean a bit burned. That's never happened before and I think it's because we've inside too muc lately, not used to the sun like we should be before stripping half naked and roasting in it at high noon lol.

 

When I was in the Dominican Republic the only people who used sunscreen were the Dutch tourists, who burned anyway. I think that people who are natives of hot and sunny places are genetically presdisposed to withstand the sun and the hot temperatures better. I've never hearf of a Kenyan with a sunburn! So it makes sense that our family  (mostly Hispanic/African descent) isn't as likely to burn as, say, my dad, the lone white guy in the family, who is pasty white and of Dutch/Scottish ancestry.

 

Also, the chemicals in sunscreen have been linked in certain studies to an increase in skin cancer. Australia is an excellent example of this---they have nearly 100% sunscreen use do to massive campaigning about it, yet their skin cancer rates are through the roof.

 

So, I don't blame super fair folks for using it because sunburns are no fun. But if you're not given to easily burning, I think the risks of sunscreen far, far outweigh any supposed benefit.

post #29 of 85

This is interesting, I'd like to read more about nutritional supplements to help combat burning. That said, we use sunscreen around here if we're going to be in the direct sun for hours at a time. My husband is of Norwegian descent, and is practically transparent, he's so pale! Our daughter inherited his super pale skin, and since she's so young I would hate for her to burn. We mostly cover her up, but I use some of the most "natural" sunscreen I can find.

 

However, my husband was just diagnosed with skin cancer, and he is now militant about covering himself with sunscreen all the time.  He has always been an athlete, so his whole childhood/early adulthood he spent tons of time outside w/out sunscreen.  Now that he's facing a lifetime of cancer treatments, he's become very cautious.  I know some people don't believe the sun causes skin cancer, but he believes it very strongly.

 

ETA: We live in Florida, where the weather is warm and sunny almost year-round, so we probably spend more time in the sun than people in colder/cloudier climates.

post #30 of 85

I was just thinking about one of the things that made me start questioning the sunscreen thing. I noticed that many articles, pamphlets, etc. would mention that we should always wear it, because it's all the 5-10 minute trips to the store that really cause problems, not the one long day in the sun or whatever. I would just sit there and wonder how researchers could possibly know the sun exposure history of patients presenting with skin cancer? If we're going all the way back to childhood, I highly doubt that I could describe my lifetime sun exposure habits with any degree of accuracy, yk? And, yet the "it's all the 5-10 minute trips" thing was presented as undeniable fact. It just made me start to rethink...

post #31 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

I was just thinking about one of the things that made me start questioning the sunscreen thing. I noticed that many articles, pamphlets, etc. would mention that we should always wear it, because it's all the 5-10 minute trips to the store that really cause problems, not the one long day in the sun or whatever. I would just sit there and wonder how researchers could possibly know the sun exposure history of patients presenting with skin cancer? If we're going all the way back to childhood, I highly doubt that I could describe my lifetime sun exposure habits with any degree of accuracy, yk? And, yet the "it's all the 5-10 minute trips" thing was presented as undeniable fact. It just made me start to rethink...


I agree. It's kind of like toothpaste... DH & I stopped using it a year or two ago (sometimes use homemade stuff, but not consistently) and our dentist is now AMAZED at how clean & healthy our teeth are (haven't disclosed our 'trick' to him lol). Yet I've just accepted for most of my life that toothpaste was essential to dental health, and accepted all their claims...

Not to get off-track... I do question some of the claims made about sunscreen, skin cancer, etc. and some things just don't make sense to me.

I also wonder if right here in this thread we might be talking about 2 different types of sunburn. It seems like there is the "burn if you step outside for a minute" kind and then the "burn if you spend 5 hours straight out in the midday sun" kind... I have been referring to the second type... I am curious if things like FCLO/coconut oil/etc. help with that or only with the short-term exposure burns? (We don't burn if we spend an hour outside... it's the extended exposures that are issues...)

Also, what are 'rash guards'??
post #32 of 85
I can spend all day outside in the extreme Alaskan sun in summer and have no issues, since I began the FCLO.
post #33 of 85

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BubblingBrooks View Post

I can spend all day outside in the extreme Alaskan sun in summer and have no issues, since I began the FCLO.


What is FCLO?

post #34 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaofLiam View Post

 


What is FCLO?


Fermented cod liver oil
post #35 of 85

Thanks. I just quickly googled it and saw that it has a lot of Vitamin D in it. Is that the primary reason you take it? Or are there other reasons too? I'm very interested in learning more about natural supplements, especially from the people who use them.

post #36 of 85

Rash guards are shirts made of swimsuit material, so you can get wet and be a little more comfortable that a regular t-shirt. Most also has the equivalent of spf built-in (it is called something else when it is in fabric, although the name escapes me). They provide sun protection without slathering your body with chemicals. I doubt the making of such fabric/clothing is all that fantastic, however. Trade-offs are a part of life.

 

Also, there are reports that regular t-shirts do not provide sun protection once wet. Certain clothing doesn't even do that great of a job of protecting one from the sun when dry.

 

I have a long-sleeve zip-up rash guard that is quite comfortable and I love how easy it is to put on and take off.

 

I agree with the PP who said there seem to be different types of sunburns being discussed. I am also referring to the extended exposure type. I used to burn in a few minutes in the sun, but a variety of things solved that for me. We only concern ourselves with extended exposure coverage nowadays.

post #37 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaofLiam View Post

 


Me too!!! I grew up in Southern California and got sunburned a lot in my teens. I feel awful about it now, and wish I would have taken better care to either stay out of the sun, wear sunscreen or whatever. I just wish I didn't get so many sunburns. greensad.gif

 


^ me, entire quote, exactly. ^

 

post #38 of 85

Oddly enough, we only use it at the beach. You'd think that same logic would apply to the city and parks, but it's a psychological association I think. Plus it's guaranteed time in the hot, unrelenting sun so I think the occasion calls for it. 

post #39 of 85
A and D work synergistically together. My Dh has type 1 diabetes, and when he started taking the FCLO, all extenuating problems with the diabetes disappeared. No more issues with slow healing and infections.
Illness is rare as well, and when it happens, we get a very mild version of what is going around.
And of course, no more sunburn.
Our baby we are adopting, also takes a does every day in her WAPF formula.

I think one of the most amazing things about the FCLO, is its ability, when combined with a nutrient dense diet and high vitamin butter oil, to reshape under bites and poor jaw structure in infants and toddlers, that is due to poor maternal diet before and during pregnancy.
We fully expect to see our baby's severe under bite heal over the next 3 years.
post #40 of 85

My family is Irish and English with fair skin and light eyes. I'm one of those people who will burn with 20 minutes of sun exposure. I've had my D levels checked and they came back "excellent." I'm also a very healthy eater so I don't believe my diet is to blame. I think cancer risk is mainly genetic. My grandfather, grandmother, and mother have all had melanoma. My sister and I have both had precancerous moles removed in our 20s. My grandparents and mother burned plenty in their youths when sunscreen was not available. (They used baby oil!) My sis and I burned some when we were younger but my mom was pretty good about putting sunblock on us by that time. 

 

These days, I cover up as much as I can in the sun at the beach, park, or wherever we are and wear mineral block on parts that I can't cover. I do the same with my sons who both share my complexion. My partner has much more olive skin and rarely burns, only tans, even though she almost never uses sunblock. Her father's face looks like leather though so I like to remind her that's what she'll look like in 20 years if she doesn't protect herself better now. :)

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