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Tell me how your gifted pre-schooler did in Kindergarten and beyond - Page 2

post #21 of 66

My oldest was considered 'gifted' by her preschool teachers. When she started kindy she seemed very advanced compared to the other children. She's just now finishing 2nd grade and things are kind of evening out. She reads above grade level but not much above.

post #22 of 66

While I certainly wouldn't make a decision based on one persons perhaps off-hand comments, I wouldn't completely discount them either.  It could be that she knows quite a bit about your school district.  There was a school district near us that was well known to not deal well with kids who were academically advanced.  People with even slightly gifted kids were warned to find another option.  Those that didn't heed the advice soon looked for other options within a few months.  (Not surprisingly this district was recently joined to another larger district in an effort to force some improvement)  

 

Our gifted pre-schooler, now 12 year old, has been homeschooled the majority of her life.  It has been the best option for her for a variety of reasons.  You need to carefully consider your school options, your kid's personality, their strengths and weaknesses, etc. to find the best fit for your situation.  There won't be a perfect solution and you may need to change plans mid-stream.  I don't consider my child 'too smart' for public school.  The public school here does not offer the environment she needs for either fully exploring her strengths or working on her weaknesses.  We might have made a different choice if we lived in a different area - who knows?  

 

By the way, I have always worked and homeschooled.  It's not easy but it is often doable.  Good luck on your explorations!

 

post #23 of 66

I'm somewhat unclear why the original poster sees her child as gifted....has the child had special testing?

 

I'm going to be a contrarian here....while there may be some kids that are genuinely gifted at the preschool level...often this is more of a developmental issue.  Kids that may seem behind in relation to your child may very likely catch up to the "gifted" preschooler, or even surpass them at the third grade level...which is when many school districts begin to test for giftedness and not before.

post #24 of 66
I agree. I think that tall kids are often mistaken for being older. Height really doesn't relate to school success.
post #25 of 66


I don't totally disagree with you. Being "advanced" doesn't neccessarily mean a child is gifted and there is more to being gifted than being advanced. WHY a child is gifted can make a difference. An "advanced" child coming from an academic preschool or who has parents that work with them (and I don't just mean crazy hot-housing... I just mean they make a point of teaching letters and numbers) isn't neccessarily gifted. A developmentally on target child with little exposure prior to kindie will make up that difference pretty quickly. In that way, there is a certain amount of evening out that can happen. Plus, it's actually in the realm of normal development to be a year advanced of a year behind in any one grade which I know many don't realize. I do feel it's in our kids best interest to hold off on identification but statistically, about 80 percent of parents who identify their children as gifted are correct. 

 

I did know my kids were gifted prior to kindergarten. I won't get into the how but I certainly knew they were unsual and likely gifted. Both my kids ended up testing in the 99th+ percentile when testing came around. 

 

Personally, I choose to trust parents instincts and on these sorts of boards. What is the real point of  forcing a poster to prove their case? Most parents pick-up on differences in their children which is what leads them to seek diagnosis whether it's giftedness or autism or whatever. Besides, OP didn't ask for laymen's diagnosis of her child. She just has this feeling about her kid might need something different and she's curious as to the situations that have worked with others. All posters have to take any input they receive with a grain of salt and understanding that the situations may not be the same. I see no reason to bring this up unless it's important yo you that she's wrong I guess.

 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coral123 View Post

I'm somewhat unclear why the original poster sees her child as gifted....has the child had special testing?

 

I'm going to be a contrarian here....while there may be some kids that are genuinely gifted at the preschool level...often this is more of a developmental issue.  Kids that may seem behind in relation to your child may very likely catch up to the "gifted" preschooler, or even surpass them at the third grade level...which is when many school districts begin to test for giftedness and not before.



 

post #26 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by whatsnextmom View Post

I do feel it's in our kids best interest to hold off on identification but statistically, about 80 percent of parents who identify their children as gifted are correct. 

 


I do agree that the OP is not likely soliciting opinions as to whether her child is gifted and there is likely no benefit to questioning the possibility at this point.  I don't know that she specifically stated that her dd was gifted anyway, just that she may be and was doing what many parent would do when considering that their children might take a path different than typical: asking how that might look.

 

That said, I did want to just mention that I seriously question the assertion that 80% of parents who id their kids as gifted are correct (and this in no way applies to the OP, just this assertion).  I suspect that this statistic comes from Linda Silverman's research.  What she has is a self selected pool of subjects whose families were able to spend thousands of dollars for testing at the Gifted Development Center, which makes them perhaps more likely to be correct in that they are sure enough to spend that kind of $.  I also believe that she said that her research shows that 80-something percent of the kids whose parents said they fit certain characteristics of giftedness were gifted in some area but with much lower scores in others such as having one high score on an IQ test but not necessarily having a gifted level composite IQ.

 

I know a lot of parents who id their kids as gifted in our local community and the local school districts themselves have ided about 20% of the kids as gifted.  I could be wrong, but I'd be seriously surprised if 80% of these kids actually fell into an area that would be considered gifted by psychometricians.  Using 20% as the # ided as gifted in my community (and it isn't that statistically unusual of a community) and 80% of those actually being gifted, we'd have 16% of our local kids actually being gifted.  I know that there are arguments as to whether gifted is the top 2%, top 1%, top 5%..., but I don't know of anyone that argues that it is the top 16%.
 

 

post #27 of 66

It likely was the Silverman Studies which I take with a grain of salt too. It's been a long while since I read them (back when I had suspicions about my own kids) but I'm pretty sure the point was that most parents who suspect giftedness in their kids are in fact correct. I don't think that is a real leap. Most parents who strongly suspect their kids to have a vision problem are correct. Most who suspect their children are delayed, are correct. You don't come across many who are totally clueless to their children's gifts and even amoungst them, either the level of giftedness is borderline or there are learning disabilities in the way of identification. Most parents figure it out. Certain populations can have a higher claims. Populations where it is "fashionable" to have a gifted child can make for some innapropriate parent diagnosis. Most come to the realization with worry and trepidation though. I always find it interesting that it's usually other parents of identified gifted children who take the most issue with other parents suspecting giftedness in young children even though they lived though the frustration of having others not trust their instincts.

post #28 of 66

Here's a thread from a long while back on the topic of parents as reliable identifiers. 

http://www.mothering.com/community/forum/thread/871900/parents-as-good-judges-of-giftedness 

 

OP, the best place for information on school options that I've found is at the playground and other parents outside of classes/lessons. 

post #29 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coral123 View Post

I'm somewhat unclear why the original poster sees her child as gifted....has the child had special testing?

 

I'm going to be a contrarian here....while there may be some kids that are genuinely gifted at the preschool level...often this is more of a developmental issue.  Kids that may seem behind in relation to your child may very likely catch up to the "gifted" preschooler, or even surpass them at the third grade level...which is when many school districts begin to test for giftedness and not before.


Maybe the other kids will catch up, but maybe they won't. I don't see a problem with the OP thinking about school options and trying to figure out what the best thing to do is.

 

You could kind of say the same thing about a preschooler with a developmental delay. Some of them are probably "late bloomers" and will have caught up to other children by 3rd grade. But I think most of us would be hesitant to tell a mom of a preschooler who had a developmental delay not to think about it or make any plans for the future because maybe her child would be caught up by third grade.

 

post #30 of 66
Thread Starter 

Okay, rather than try to figure out the "multi-quote" thing I am just going to try and respond to everyone at once.

 

First of all I in NO WAY am saying "My kid is too smart for school".  I am genuinely concerned that she will have difficulty in a school that cannot work with her "advancedness" (if that's even a word, but I'm getting the feeling it is not politically correct to use the term "gifted" if she hasn't been formally tested).  

 

Second, I am her mother.  I am with her all day everyday.  I know she is "advanced" and given my history, my husband's history and her current skills I highly suspect she will indeed be considered gifted. And for the record, this post wasn't a "is my child gifted?" kind of post, so I didn't document every account of someone noticing how advanced my daughter is.  People have been commenting on it since she was teenie tiny.  People we barely know and people we are very very close to.  Her Sunday School teachers, her pediatrician, her grandparents, her aunts and uncles, my friends, her friends' parents, the walmart checkers, the other parents at the mall, the ECI councilor that has been seeing my younger daughter for the past 6 months, and the list goes on.... My point is, this is not a one time encounter, it just happened to be the first time someone suggested Homeschooling because of it.  I do realize the SW was investigating us, but she also seemed very genuine in the things she said.    I am also very concerned about the Texas Schools' budget cuts.  I don't know how that will affect elementary schools, but since my husband is a hs teacher I know how it is affecting the highschools.  If it is this dramatic in the districts elementary schools as well there is no way my daughter will get what she needs.  There's a lot to my reasoning behind this post, not just one off-handed comment.  I just didn't realize I needed to spell it all out.

 

Lastly, I think I have a responsibility to look at all the options and plan for her future.  Also, perhaps she will adjust into "normal" and be just fine in 3rd grade.  But does that mean I shouldn't worry about  K, 1st and 2nd? That's a full 3 years! 

 

And thank you to everyone that shared experiences and gave ideas for checking into schools.  This is all new to me, I was just looking for a little guidance and wisdom from the BTDT's here. Sorry for any typos, NAK.

 

 

 

post #31 of 66

My girls are not in K yet, but I can tell you what we are doing.

 

I have twin DDs. As your DD- since they were small- it was mentioned that they were bright, verbal. They had/have some prematurity related delays- but none of them cognitive.

 

 

My DD will be entering K this fall. They will be almost 6 due to cut-off dates.

 

 

We had the same concerns- DDs were both reading, writing,and doing simple math before age 4.They did PreK at age 3 turning 4, both walked in reading at least a 1st grade level. At the time, we were thrilled that they would get to go to K at 4 turning 5.

 

Then we moved to a state that had an earlier cut-off date. No exceptions( we looked into it). So they did another year of PreK.

 

Now they are walking in to K in a few weeks at 5y 9 m.  Both are reading easily at late 2nd/3rd grade level, can do simple multiplication/division, write short stories, etc. I was worried how it would go in public K. They have not been tested for gifted, but it  has been brought up in conversation--- PreK teacher suggested skip K altogether, but state age limits dont allow it. Possibly, by grade 3- they will be even with peers, maybe- maybe not.

 

Our PreK was play-based and really good--- but they did not do much academics at all. So DDs enjoyed it- they did lots of art, singing, science, etc. DDs both could read- but it really was not an issue . It was a good time to learn much needed social skills and they really were leaders and had a good time. They would have been miserable in a more academic setting learning letter of the week. So look into PreKs and see what they do and how they are set up.

 

We found a local school that does multi-age and project based learning. They will be in a split class K/1  made up of  5-7 yr olds (start of year) and be ability grouped for math, reading, writing. Then whole class for science, social studies, art,gym etc. I have already talked to the principal and the gifted coordinator (no firm identification until 2nd grade)--- they state they will accommodate for differences (both DDs are much stronger readers than in math). They both have vast science and geography knowledge, but have gaps-- I hope the school can fill for them. Neither DD has good penmenship (given their writing skills), so I hope they will do more writing in school to help them write more legibly. I think, at this time, there are a lot of things that K/1 class has to offer so I am looking forward to seeing how they do. A more set-format of letter, sit, write, etc would not work-- but with the multi-age and project based learning (everything is based on themes) will be beneficial for both of them.

 

We will give it a go and see how it works. If it does not- I can homeschool, but really think my extroverted kiddos would do better in a school atmosphere- plus I need to work at least part time.=. I am willing to see how the schools do and handle it.

 

That said-- Kindergarten is a lot more than it used to be. In our area, kiddos are expected to be reading mid-year and writing complete sentences after holiday break. Many kiddos will be ahead of these expectations and a few will be behind. The K-2nd grade teachers are (if you get a good teacher) good at differentiating. A good teacher can really really make a big difference for K, 1, 2.

 

Contact the school later this year (as in Fall), send your DD to PreK, and take it from there- you may be surprised of what the schools will do.

post #32 of 66
Aw OP, hugs. That list of people noticing-- a lot of the time that is less than fun. Awkward, especially as your kid hears it all! Anyway I agree most parents know their kid and it's smart to be thinking ahead, considering different possibilities. That's what I was doing when I started reading the gifted forum here a couple years back and I'm glad I did bc my kid ended up being as advanced at four as at two and I need all the weird age/level book recs I've accumulated. And you know thing could develop different ways but you are casting a wide net in research mode. That way you will be prepared.

My dd is still four and can't go to school until nearly 5.5. We are strongly thinking homeschool for at least the start bc if various things we dislike about our blue-ribbon local schools, and bearing all that while she sits and others learn to read and pass the state tests (seriously test focused here, I mean the principal is in your life!) doesn't seem worth it. But there are homeschool charters that do one or four days a week of classes and we might try those-- we'll just see. We are exploring all the options now and then we'll see what fits best!
post #33 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdmommie View Post

Okay, rather than try to figure out the "multi-quote" thing I am just going to try and respond to everyone at once.

 

First of all I in NO WAY am saying "My kid is too smart for school".  I am genuinely concerned that she will have difficulty in a school that cannot work with her "advancedness" (if that's even a word, but I'm getting the feeling it is not politically correct to use the term "gifted" if she hasn't been formally tested).  

 

Second, I am her mother.  I am with her all day everyday.  I know she is "advanced" and given my history, my husband's history and her current skills I highly suspect she will indeed be considered gifted.


Being careful about using the word "gifted" when talking about a preschooler is not about political correctness, but about the limits of psychometric testing. As IQ test measure a child's cognitive skills in relation to a normative sample and children develop not on a steady trajectory but in leaps and bounds, test results may vary up to 30 pts during childhood and thus are not generally considered really stable until children are about 11, and not stable enough to make educational decisions until about 7. Also, testing of young children in anything in which they have to cooperate is likely to be skewed by immaturity (we have some very weird test results from developmental testing for our DS and are still not sure whether he just refused to participate because of the format or what the problem was...) and some (!) of the advantages of early academic exposure even out after all kids have had comparable exposure to formal schooling (particularly important if the testing used for gifted programming is partly or wholly based on achievement). So, calling children under 7 or so not "gifted" but "advanced" is good scientific usage (and of course, politically correct, too...)

That said, some children are so far and so indisputably advanced, and both family history and their developmental trajectory so far so clearly point to the child turning out gifted when formally assessed at an appropriate age (which may be younger than 7 in that case), you need to do your research thinking about your child as gifted.

I am, but am very careful talking about it in real life!

post #34 of 66

My daughter is in second grade this year and was just tested as gifted. I don't necessarily think she is. She was reading at 4, chapter books and multiplication at 5 etc.etc. But I don't think she's gifted. She is very bright, and ahead of her age academically, but personally I think gifted means something else. Anyway, about school...She went to a fun preschool for 2 years and loved it. I don't think they even knew that she was reading. 

 

Kindergarten was a struggle because academically she was very far ahead. She is an easy child though, and would just find something to entertain herself. When she started drawing puppets on her fingers and putting on multi-act plays for the other kids (when she finished her work in about 5 minutes) when they were supposed to be working, the teacher finally noticed and started giving her work appropriate to her level. She was allowed to bring in her own chapter books from home when the other kids were doing letters, colors etc.  We did a lot of stuff at home that year because there was a lot she wanted to learn about that she couldn't get at school (multiplication, certain science subjects, division).

 

We have had good teachers in public school so far. We are at a small school with blended classrooms. For first grade, my daughter was in a first grade/second grade blend. So the teacher just had her do second grade work all year. For reading she was sent to a higher level group. This year (second grade) she has been in a second/third grade blend and has done third grade work all year. There are no blends for fourth grade so I don't know what's going to happen next year. They have been very open to teaching her at her level though, so I have high hopes. And now that she has been labeled TAG, they will hopefully take that into consideration.

post #35 of 66

My DS was a young 5 year old starting K in an area with lots of redshirting.   He started K reading at about an end of 2nd grade level and while it took a few weeks for the teacher to notice/test him adequately, they really did a lot for him.   He was subject accelerated for reading to the high reading group in a 2nd grade class;   got to spend 2-3 hours/week with the librarian working on research projects and got to skip some of the center stuff in K.   He made great friends and really liked K.   We ended up having him tested for our district's GT Center program in the Spring and he scored 99% across the board (Verbal, Non-Verbal, Quantitative), so he'll be switching schools in the Fall and will be in a self-contained GT 1st grade class.   Testing was important to us b/c while we thought he was bright, we didn't know if he was just a precocious reader :)   We talked to the GT resource teacher at our neighborhood school and her feeling was that they could probably continue to accommodate subject acceleration in reading/language arts, but if he tested across the board, that a center program would probably be a better fit.   My older DD also has a GT designation, but it's not quite as high and it's only in Math and she's an entering 4th grader (at our neighborhood K-6), so we decided to keep her at our home school.  The GT center won't be a perfect fit either, but they do accelerate the curriculum (they do all of 1st and 2nd grade curriculum in 1st grade) across the board and they individualize instruction (it depends on the year, but my DS's current reading level leaving K is higher than any of the 1st graders in the GT class) in specific subjects.  

 

I'd encourage you to closely monitor what's happening for your DC and research the options and just see where things take you.   We honestly couldn't have asked for more from our neighborhood school...they really went above and beyond.   We're going to take things one year at a time and if the center program doesn't seem like a great fit, we'll probably move him back to our home school...

post #36 of 66

What exactly qualifies as gifted to you? Being gifted isn't only 10-year-olds at the university. General rule (and what most schools accept as gifted) is 98th percentile.... top 2 percent of the population IQ wise. 98th percentile isn't typically skipping grades and going to college early. 98th percentile are exactly what you said... very bright and often ahead academically. They may not even need much at school outside a teacher who pays attention. It's a pretty wide spectrum within those 2 percentiles and personality plays a big part in how it's displayed.

 

You don't have to consider your DD gifted but I do hope you don't dismiss the fact that she is different. At some point, she's going to understand she's unusual (if not already) and it'll make the world of difference to have mom say "yes, you are an accelerated learner and there is nothing wrong with that at all. There is nothing wrong with you and you aren't the only one in the world."

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nuttymom View Post

My daughter is in second grade this year and was just tested as gifted. I don't necessarily think she is. She was reading at 4, chapter books and multiplication at 5 etc.etc. But I don't think she's gifted. She is very bright, and ahead of her age academically, but personally I think gifted means something else. Anyway, about school...She went to a fun preschool for 2 years and loved it. I don't think they even knew that she was reading. 

 

Kindergarten was a struggle because academically she was very far ahead. She is an easy child though, and would just find something to entertain herself. When she started drawing puppets on her fingers and putting on multi-act plays for the other kids (when she finished her work in about 5 minutes) when they were supposed to be working, the teacher finally noticed and started giving her work appropriate to her level. She was allowed to bring in her own chapter books from home when the other kids were doing letters, colors etc.  We did a lot of stuff at home that year because there was a lot she wanted to learn about that she couldn't get at school (multiplication, certain science subjects, division).

 

We have had good teachers in public school so far. We are at a small school with blended classrooms. For first grade, my daughter was in a first grade/second grade blend. So the teacher just had her do second grade work all year. For reading she was sent to a higher level group. This year (second grade) she has been in a second/third grade blend and has done third grade work all year. There are no blends for fourth grade so I don't know what's going to happen next year. They have been very open to teaching her at her level though, so I have high hopes. And now that she has been labeled TAG, they will hopefully take that into consideration.



 

 

post #37 of 66
DD entered K reading at about the third or fourth grade level; she was less advanced in math on paper, but only because we had not taught her. It was...okay. Not terrible, not great. First grade was somewhat more meaty and she did eventually get differentiated for reading, but not math. She was still bored and complained. She did learn to count money and tell time and also improved her penmanship and writing mechanics, so the year was not a waste, though she could have learned much more. Next year, she will move to a gifted magnet, which she wanted to do and is excited about.

Overall, the experience was not ideal (hence the move) but not awful or wretched or terribly damaging. DD is very extroverted and would not do well with homeschooling unless we kept a frenetic pace with outside classes and activities, which is not something I can do.

FWIW, we suspected giftedness in DD from about age 1 and she did indeed test in the 99th%. However, she is not going to take calculus at 8 or discover theoretical physics principles at 10. She is very bright and quick, but not some sort of way-out-there unheard-of genius.
post #38 of 66


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by whatsnextmom View Post

What exactly qualifies as gifted to you? Being gifted isn't only 10-year-olds at the university. General rule (and what most schools accept as gifted) is 98th percentile.... top 2 percent of the population IQ wise. 98th percentile isn't typically skipping grades and going to college early. 98th percentile are exactly what you said... very bright and often ahead academically. They may not even need much at school outside a teacher who pays attention. It's a pretty wide spectrum within those 2 percentiles and personality plays a big part in how it's displayed.

 

You don't have to consider your DD gifted but I do hope you don't dismiss the fact that she is different. At some point, she's going to understand she's unusual (if not already) and it'll make the world of difference to have mom say "yes, you are an accelerated learner and there is nothing wrong with that at all. There is nothing wrong with you and you aren't the only one in the world."

 

 

 



 

 

I don't think I implied in anyway that I don't think she's unusual or special. Believe me, I am her biggest cheerleader. She scored in the 98th percentile for both math and reading. Our district considers anything above 97% as gifted. So, yes, I realize she is very bright. Her IQ was tested and is average. I don't know enough about that to know how it is related.  I just am not that into labeling her. I have a strong interest in her education because I'm her Mom. I make sure that she is being challenged and supported at school. If she isn't, we provide challenges for her at home, which is pretty much all the time. 

 

I think what I meant, is that "gifted" to me just means something else, like a different way of thinking.  My daughter doesn't think outside the box all that much or have the ability to grasp certain concepts beyond her years. I think you have a point that this might be more related to her personality. 
 

 

post #39 of 66


I didn't mean to accuse you of not thinking she's special. I was just thrown by you saying she'd been accepted into the gifted program at school but you still didn't think she was gifted. I grew up with parents who thought it was wrong to acknowledge giftedness. It left me feeling very iscolated and worried there was something wrong with me. I actually thought I must be mentally delayed because I was pulled away from my peers to work yet continually told I was "normal." I couldn't reconcile "normal" but "has to work alone" when I was 7. It was SUCH a relief when I went to middle school, placed in a gifted class and realized it was nothing but being a faster learner just like some kids are more athletic or have nicer singing voices.

 

So, it looks like your schools program is a high-achiever program as opposed to a gifted program. They use state or achievement testing for placement? If she's testing high on achievement but average in IQ then I totally understand where you are coming from. I'd assumed she'd gotten into the GATE program with an ability or IQ test and you just didn't believe she was gifted.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by nuttymom View Post


 

I don't think I implied in anyway that I don't think she's unusual or special. Believe me, I am her biggest cheerleader. She scored in the 98th percentile for both math and reading. Our district considers anything above 97% as gifted. So, yes, I realize she is very bright. Her IQ was tested and is average. I don't know enough about that to know how it is related.  I just am not that into labeling her. I have a strong interest in her education because I'm her Mom. I make sure that she is being challenged and supported at school. If she isn't, we provide challenges for her at home, which is pretty much all the time. 

 

I think what I meant, is that "gifted" to me just means something else, like a different way of thinking.  My daughter doesn't think outside the box all that much or have the ability to grasp certain concepts beyond her years. I think you have a point that this might be more related to her personality. 
 

 



 

post #40 of 66

Yes, she is a high achiever, that is just what I would call her. Our school uses CogAT to qualify kids for the TAG program. So it is technically a gifted program, we just got the news that she was in it about a month ago. They test all second graders here with CogAt. I only know her IQ score because her and I volunteered at a research study at a medical school, and part of it for her was an IQ test which they told me the results to.

 

I understand where you're coming from. I was put into higher level classes when I was young as well, and not told a whole lot about it. Not the best experience of my life. 

 

Anyway, we are new to the whole Talented and Gifted program so I don't know a whole lot about it yet but think it will be interesting for my daughter. The TAG kids got to go on a field trip to the Air and Space museum 2 weeks ago. My daughter felt so special being only one of a few kids in her class to get to go. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by whatsnextmom View Post


I didn't mean to accuse you of not thinking she's special. I was just thrown by you saying she'd been accepted into the gifted program at school but you still didn't think she was gifted. I grew up with parents who thought it was wrong to acknowledge giftedness. It left me feeling very iscolated and worried there was something wrong with me. I actually thought I must be mentally delayed because I was pulled away from my peers to work yet continually told I was "normal." I couldn't reconcile "normal" but "has to work alone" when I was 7. It was SUCH a relief when I went to middle school, placed in a gifted class and realized it was nothing but being a faster learner just like some kids are more athletic or have nicer singing voices.

 

So, it looks like your schools program is a high-achiever program as opposed to a gifted program. They use state or achievement testing for placement? If she's testing high on achievement but average in IQ then I totally understand where you are coming from. I'd assumed she'd gotten into the GATE program with an ability or IQ test and you just didn't believe she was gifted.

 

 

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