or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Pregnancy and Birth › Birth and Beyond › Birth Professionals › Midwives › New here, looking for tips on starting midwifery education: schools/self study/PEP/etc!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New here, looking for tips on starting midwifery education: schools/self study/PEP/etc! - Page 2

post #21 of 52

I am an AAMI student and I love it. It's only book work(minus the required skills lab), you have to get the apprenticeship and experiential learning yourself. The school is not for everyone, Carla has very strong opinions as do most of the staff and students. It's a lot about critical thinking and learning, there are guidleines in your study and of course an actually cirriculum with assignments you must complete. It is far from "a joke" it's the most thorough course available, and the oldest school in the states. I'm really sad to see so much AAMI bashing. To call the work that many student midwives are doing a joke, when in fact many of us are working our butts off and learning and seeking information from every source imagineable is like calling all our efforts, time spent away from our families, our commitment to midwifery a joke.

 

If you want to know more about the school then you should contact Carla yourself, and see if she can put you in touch with current students, past students, and grads. Like I said, the school is not for everyone, just like NCM isn't for everyone, and MCU isn't for everyone. Doesn't mean it needs to be bashed if it doesn't fit your needs. It's scary to jump in when you don't know what you're going to get, and knowing you can't get a refund, but just in the little time I"ve been enrolled what I've learned has paid for the course. It's worth far more than it costs.  

post #22 of 52

The Michigan school of traditional midwifery www.traditionalmidwife.org is the only course were you get a state endorsed diploma in traditional midwifery that really prepares you for narm or starting your own practice.

post #23 of 52
This is very interesting to me as well, as I am looking into all this now. I looked at that National college of Midwifery website and they talked about just using the modules as a guide to use with your "preceptor". Does that mean a Midwife who's certified who's willing to train you? And if so, do you then have to pay for the stuff on the website, or how does that work?
post #24 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angela Aloisi View Post

This is very interesting to me as well, as I am looking into all this now. I looked at that National college of Midwifery website and they talked about just using the modules as a guide to use with your "preceptor". Does that mean a Midwife who's certified who's willing to train you? And if so, do you then have to pay for the stuff on the website, or how does that work?


Preceptor is your midwife who apprentices you. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I think what they mean there is that you can use their curriculum as a guide for self study and to getting skills checked off with your preceptor. They have all of their courses listed with learning objectives, books to read, skills to check off, and questions to test your knowledge. If thats the way it works, then you wouldn't pay anything or get a degree from them. I guess they are just saying that you are free to use their stuff. But if you did it that way, you would have to do the PEP. If you pay for the program, you'll probably get more materials and then you'll check off skills through them and avoid PEP.
 

 

post #25 of 52

All these replies have been super helpful! Thanks for sharing what your path is and what has worked for you. Since I am doing doula training just now, midwifery education is a little ways off, but I want to be thinking about it and preparing for it now. I have bookmarked this thread and will come back to it often, I'm sure!

post #26 of 52

One course you might want to consider is Elizabeth Davis' Heart and Hands: http://elizabethdavis.com/classes/

 

The course is only $1075 for the basic course and $425 for the advanced modules.

post #27 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by phathui5 View Post

One course you might want to consider is Elizabeth Davis' Heart and Hands: http://elizabethdavis.com/classes/

 

The course is only $1075 for the basic course and $425 for the advanced modules.

I bookmarked that, it looks wonderful. :)
 

 

post #28 of 52

I am leaning towards the Living Tree International College of Midwifery. It is work at your own pace and they are a non profit program. They base your tuition on your income and expenses and your ability to pay.

 

http://www.birthandwellness.com/school/index.php

post #29 of 52

Hi Cheap Sunglasses...I'm in the process of going through the PEP track with NARM.  I have a preceptor all lined up and am eagerly/nervously awaiting the journey that lies ahead. I've been reading through these forums and they've definitely inspired me.  You mentioned you were going through the self-study route.  Are you still doing so?  How's it been going?  Any advice or suggestions of how to get started? What books have you found to be the most useful?

 

I look forward to any feedback you may be willing/able to share...

 

MissBird80

post #30 of 52


Quote:

Originally Posted by MissBird80 View Post

Hi Cheap Sunglasses...I'm in the process of going through the PEP track with NARM.  I have a preceptor all lined up and am eagerly/nervously awaiting the journey that lies ahead. I've been reading through these forums and they've definitely inspired me.  You mentioned you were going through the self-study route.  Are you still doing so?  How's it been going?  Any advice or suggestions of how to get started? What books have you found to be the most useful?

 

I look forward to any feedback you may be willing/able to share...

 

MissBird80



Hello!  I'm still here, fighting the good fight :)  I am going to PM you what I have shared via email with another hopeful midwife regarding my study plan.  Honestly, ALL of the books from the NARM reference list have been helpful.  I would suggest starting with something brief like Heart & Hands for an overview, and then on to Myles Textbook for Midwives for an in-depth and well-organized next step.

 

post #31 of 52

Hey everyone! Thanks for all of the information about the didactic portion of midwifery studies. I have looked at all of the programs, both MEAC and non-MEAC, and narrowed it down to a few that have the learning style and philosophies that I like. My only concern is that here in North Carolina, midwifery is illegal (practicing medicine without a license - a misdemeanor offense). The have a bill before the state senate right now that will make licensure for midwives available possibly as early as January 2012 (if she is CPM certified), but after December 31, 2013, if a person isn't already CPM certified she will only be able to get licensed if she attends a MEAC accredited school! Aacck!!! I want to begin this journey soo bad, but my hands are being tied. Since most of the didactic components take 1-2 years, and the PEP process for CPM can be quite intense, I'm stuck with only the MEAC accredited option. Any thoughts?

post #32 of 52

As far as MEAC accredited schools go, the National Midwifery Institute is the most economical option.

post #33 of 52

Have to jump in here and say that Ancient Art Midwifery Institute is wonderful and NOT a joke! In fact, there are many schools out there that have based THEIR curriculums off of it.  It is a very thorough and challenging program, which is why I chose it.  One of the great things about it (something that I always appreciated in professors at the college where I got my BS degree) is that the program challenges you to think through WHY you believe what you do.  Is it something that everybody has always said? What evidence is there that a particular practice is beneficial?  Who paid for the study?  Is this or that practice actually causing harm? What is the physiology that makes birth work?  They don't think for you. YOU have to do that.  It's a fabulous education, and well worth the money. I am putting 2 kids through college right now, and I don't believe that their education will be any better than that I'm getting through AAMI, but theirs is certainly more expensive! 

post #34 of 52

I've heard many mixed things about AAMI from friends who were enrolled.  The biggest complaint: it wasn't worth the money.  It's A LOT of money!  That's why I chose www.midwifetobe.com  It's 25.00 per unit and you pay as you go, but I have an apprenticeship that I'm starting a few weeks and just need a kick in the butt on reading.  I did do the AAMI Skillslab last year and though it was wonderful!

post #35 of 52

I think it's worth every penny to enroll in AAMI, although I understand money concerns in this economy.  I can't imagine anyone who has actually completed Orientation and gotten their curriculum could think it wasn't worth the money!  It's quite in depth, and all self-directed.  I guess that could be a reason some people aren't satisfied.  If a person doesn't want or doesn't know how to seek out information and answers, I could see them being disappointed.  But the staff and other students are very helpful with answering questions and trading ideas and information.  Plus, there are a lot of "extras" in the course.  Very worth it IMO.  I know that in the past some practicing midwives have enrolled in the course, just to round out their knowledge base.

post #36 of 52

I am very happy with AAMI. I do not quite understand why some criticize it. Perhaps they haven't gone through the course? Maybe it is simply because AAMI is not MEAC approved -- by choice! -- so aspiring midwives don't believe there is value in the education? I base my assessment of value on what is learned as well as the process that gets me to my goal, not just a stamp of approval. For those who enjoy a challenge and want a thorough education, AAMI is wonderful!

post #37 of 52

Perhaps the criticism of AAMI comes largely from the claims and ideas of it's creator.....

post #38 of 52

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cinderella08 View Post

Perhaps the criticism of AAMI comes largely from the claims and ideas of it's creator.....


 

Can you be more specific?
 

 

post #39 of 52

Which claims are you referring to? 

 

It seems to me that there is no need to criticize other courses or paths to midwifery. We each need to find the academic program and apprenticeship which suits us best. Midwives are a diverse group with differing needs. I knew right away that one or two different schools weren't for me. I don't go around discouraging others from attending them.

 

If we cannot allow our fellow midwives to plot their own courses, how is it that we will be able to allow mothers to be in charge of their births? We need to focus on our strengths as birth attendants who serve women and families. We need to focus on how we can protect their rights to birth their babies wherever and with whomever they want. Tearing each other down -- and in a vague manner -- isn't going to help anyone.

 

So ...  please share your negative impressions and perhaps those of us who are current AAMI students can shed some light on common misconceptions.

post #40 of 52

There is thread after thread about AAMI and all of the pros and cons in the archives. Tons!!! I would suggest you check those out I don't think we need to rehash it. I think the main criticisms of AAMI is all of the cost up front, midwifery beliefs of Carla Hartley aka Trust Birth Movement, and claims that other programs were stolen or copied from AAMI. Also the fact that anyone who ever criticized AAMI gets attacked by people on this list. Happens all the time, happened to me and I received dozens of private emails from AAMI students who were unhappy but were afraid and even bullied(their words not mine) to speak out and share their experiences. Personally I don't really care. I am just glad there are many options.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Midwives
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Pregnancy and Birth › Birth and Beyond › Birth Professionals › Midwives › New here, looking for tips on starting midwifery education: schools/self study/PEP/etc!