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So what does CPS look for? Can they inestigate over any concerned call from someone? I'm in Canada. - Page 2

post #21 of 143

Your absoluetely right, they can speak to your kids w/o a warrent. I believe that they cant remove your kids w/o a warrent.

post #22 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by beenmum View Post

If it is a serious allegation, they return later with a warrent to remove your kids b/c they were unable to complete their investigation that your children were safe and their home was secure of any dangers. (Not clean, but safe).

 

Why risk that? I am truely at a loss b/c I dont understand why someone would refuse the CPS the ability to ensure your children are safe. They dont want to remove your kids.

 

They want to ensure that your kids are not being harmed.

 

Parents abuse their kids. Parents murder their kids. I have seen it first hand.

 

Thats why CPS is there. The workers dont know you from Eve. If someone says that your bausing your kids, then they have to ensure your not. Its as simple as that.

 


I'm not arguing that kids shouldn't be protected from abusive parents and caretakers. I'm saying that there's a significant lack of widespread community education and awareness about what is and isn't legal and acceptable when it comes to CPS workers. I wouldn't know the first thing about how to verify that the person standing on my porch and demanding to see my children is, in fact, a CPS worker and not some nutter who is trying to harm me or my kids. If a stranger appears on my doorstep and demands to see my children, you can bet that my first reaction will be one of skepticism and defensiveness -- isn't that fairly natural? 

 

And the whole "if you have nothing to hide, what's the problem?" thing is such a slippery slope. I don't use drugs or have any in my home, but that doesn't mean that I'd submit to a cavity search because a stranger appeared on my doorstep and asked to see my rectum, you know? They may well be able to force me to submit to a search eventually, but they'd have to jump through every legal hoop first, and it wouldn't be because I had something to hide. 

post #23 of 143


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post




I'm not arguing that kids shouldn't be protected from abusive parents and caretakers. I'm saying that there's a significant lack of widespread community education and awareness about what is and isn't legal and acceptable when it comes to CPS workers. I wouldn't know the first thing about how to verify that the person standing on my porch and demanding to see my children is, in fact, a CPS worker and not some nutter who is trying to harm me or my kids. If a stranger appears on my doorstep and demands to see my children, you can bet that my first reaction will be one of skepticism and defensiveness -- isn't that fairly natural? 

 

And the whole "if you have nothing to hide, what's the problem?" thing is such a slippery slope. I don't use drugs or have any in my home, but that doesn't mean that I'd submit to a cavity search because a stranger appeared on my doorstep and asked to see my rectum, you know? They may well be able to force me to submit to a search eventually, but they'd have to jump through every legal hoop first, and it wouldn't be because I had something to hide. 

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I actually tried to lookup last night whether or not CAS in Ontario (CPS for Americans) is permitted into your house without a warrant and the answer is murky.

 

It seems police are allowed into your house without a warrant and may apprehend children without a warrant if they:

 

a)  have serious concerns that children are in  danger  

b)  they do not believe there is time to get a warrant and the situation is grave.

 

It was less clear on what CAS workers were permitted to do under the law (i.e. enter without permission - not that I can see this happening).  It also does not mention what serious concerns are - is a third party report a serious concern?  Abuse and danger might be - but neglect other than serious neglect might not be.

 

I actually spent about 1/2 hour trying to dig up an answer to this question and got nowhere.  I think CAS does not want people to know their rights (suspicious minded of me, I know).  People who do not know their rights are easier to manipulate.  Flame away at me if you want, but I have seen this (people in power wanting others kept in the dark) over and over again.

 

I would also like to point out that many of the people that answered here work for CAS or CPS.  They are well versed in CAS policy - but CAS policy is not necessarily the law.  CAS policy may be that they have to get in the house and talk to the kids - that is fine and dandy - but their rules might not be something that parents have to comply with.  The rules on if parents have to comply with entry without a warrant may depend on circumstances (police presence who say "let us in without a warrant" or not).  Of course, parents may decide the easiest and best course is to comply - I have no issues with that.

 

I do not think for one minute that a judge is going terminate a parents rights because they ask to see a warrant.  Asking to see a warrant proves nothing - other than you may know your rights.  It may look suspicious to CAS workers - but looking suspicious is hardly proof of anything.   To think anything else is illogical and assumptive.   It almost seems like scare mongerring to say "let them in or they will take your kids".  That would be an serious abuse of power if it were true.



 

post #24 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. Bratton View Post


 

Just because a social worker does not have children doesn't mean she is not an expert. They CAN still determine whether or not your house is a fit place for a child to live according to the law. I don't understand how a person would have to be a parent to make that call, especially when that is their job and what they are trained to do and, yes, a degree does kind of make you an expert, lol. I would argue that just having kids does not make one an expert.

 


Agreed.  If so many parents were such great experts themselves, there would be no need for CPS.  I was once a 20 something childless social worker whose outlook and job didn't change once she had kids. Not to mention, if you have any idea the types of homes social workers go into the vast majority of the time, you would know that your average 8th grader would be able to deem a home unsafe in about 80% of the cases... 
 

 

post #25 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post

 

I do not think for one minute that a judge is going terminate a parents rights because they ask to see a warrant.  Asking to see a warrant proves nothing - other than you may know your rights.  It may look suspicious to CAS workers - but looking suspicious is hardly proof of anything.   To think anything else is illogical and assumptive.   It almost seems like scare mongerring to say "let them in or they will take your kids".  That would be an serious abuse of power if it were true.
 


You're really dismissive of the responses of those of us who have/do work in CPS considering you're making guesses as to how social workers and judges will respond.  It isn't scare mongering to suggest your best bet is to let CPS in.  What sort of motive do you think we have in advising that?  If you have nothing to hide, you are best to let CPS in.  No, a judge won't TPR because you didn't allow access to your kids, but you may end up having your kids in foster care before you're able to sort things out.  It is a straight up bad idea to be uncooperative with CPS as they will automatically assume you are trying to hide something.  Bad, bad, bad advice.  And my ONLY reason for even bothering to post that is so that if anyone on these boards ends up in the unlikely and unfortunate situation of being falsely accused of something and ends up with CPS at their doorstep, I'd like them to know that the fastest way to resolve everything will be to show CPS you have nothing to hide.   
 

 

post #26 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by APToddlerMama View Post




You're really dismissive of the responses of those of us who have/do work in CPS considering you're making guesses as to how social workers and judges will respond.  It isn't scare mongering to suggest your best bet is to let CPS in.  What sort of motive do you think we have in advising that?  If you have nothing to hide, you are best to let CPS in.  No, a judge won't TPR because you didn't allow access to your kids, but you may end up having your kids in foster care before you're able to sort things out.  It is a straight up bad idea to be uncooperative with CPS as they will automatically assume you are trying to hide something.  Bad, bad, bad advice.  And my ONLY reason for even bothering to post that is so that if anyone on these boards ends up in the unlikely and unfortunate situation of being falsely accused of something and ends up with CPS at their doorstep, I'd like them to know that the fastest way to resolve everything will be to show CPS you have nothing to hide.   
 

 


Lots here.

 

I am not dismissive pf the responses of those who work for CPS.  I am simply stating CPS policy may not be law.  There is a difference.

 

Beenmum has said twice that if you do not let CPS in a judge will take your kids. I think that is fear mongerring.  

 

It is a sad day when refusing to let strangers (CPS)  into your house means you have something to hide.  Sad.  I cannot control how people think, but I sincerely hope CPS does not assume you have something to hide because you do not give them free access to your kids and home.  

 

I am not advising people on how to act if CPS shows up at your door - it may be that cooperating is the best idea.  I do not know and individual circumstances do come into play.

 

My argument here has been with whether or not CPS an come into your house without a warrant.  I have said I did not know and had a hard time finding out.  This is very different from saying whether or not as parent should co-operate with CPS.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #27 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post

 

Beenmum has said twice that if you do not let CPS in a judge will take your kids. I think that is fear mongerring.  

 

It is a sad day when refusing to let strangers (CPS)  into your house means you have something to hide.  Sad.

 


I don't think that advising that the fastest way to get CPS out of your life is to let them in is fear mongering.  It is truly in a parent's best interest to cooperate with CPS. 

 

 It would be an even more sad day if hundreds of thousands of kids continued to be abused and neglected because CPS no longer had the right to come into homes and check on the welfare of children about whom serious allegations had been made.  There is, unfortunately, no way to verify child safety and well being without some invasion of privacy. 
 

 

post #28 of 143


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post


My argument here has been with whether or not CPS an come into your house without a warrant. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I don't think so, no.  In fact, even if they show up with the police, no one can enter your private residence without a court order (unless immediate danger is apparent -- ie a guy with a knife going after someone, and this is visible from the porch). You are absolutely within your rights to refuse entry, to anyone - law enforcement included (who often tag along as reinforcement when there are abuse allegations w/enough evidence to assume it could be dangerous for the field worker). 

 

However, CPS can very well keep your case open and supervisors can go to a judge and get a warrant.  Before it gets to that point, they have the legal right to talk to your family, friends, pediatrician, teachers, and even your kids while they are in school.  They can very well create a case against you without your full cooperation, and for the most part, yes, they are going to assume you have something to hide when you are restricting their access into your life.  Their job is to be sure that children are safe.  This may be something they are able to determine from afar, from interviews and statements, documents and phone calls; but the process could very well go so much quicker and smoother, I'm thinking, if they are able to just see the children and determine they are in fact, not being abused or neglected.  Of course, even seeing the kids and touring your home, they might not be able to close the case right there on the spot, but they surely can do so quicker if they actually have that opportunity vs. being strung along and having to involve legal action. 

 

There are risks involved with letting CPS come inside your home and life unannounced, sure, but there are huge, huge, huge risks when child welfare is unable to determine whether or not the call they got is in fact a abuse case, where innocent children could be in immediate danger. 
 

 

post #29 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by APToddlerMama View Post




I don't think that advising that the fastest way to get CPS out of your life is to let them in is fear mongering.  It is truly in a parent's best interest to cooperate with CPS. 

 

 



I did not say that. My statement (below) was in direct response to Beanmum statement (further below).

 

It is not fear mongering to advise people to let CPS in; it is fear mongering to say not letting them in will result in their removal by the end of the day.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post




 

 

Beenmum has said twice that if you do not let CPS in a judge will take your kids. I think that is fear mongerring.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by beenmum View Post

 

And they CAN just come into your home. They do not need an invitation. IF you refuse, you will be put to the fdront of the caseload and you will have a judge signing to remove your kids before the end of the day.

 

 



 

post #30 of 143

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drummer's Wife View Post

However, CPS can very well keep your case open and supervisors can go to a judge and get a warrant.  Before it gets to that point, they have the legal right to talk to your family, friends, pediatrician, teachers, and even your kids while they are in school.  They can very well create a case against you without your full cooperation, and for the most part, yes, they are going to assume you have something to hide when you are restricting their access into your life.  Their job is to be sure that children are safe.  This may be something they are able to determine from afar, from interviews and statements, documents and phone calls; but the process could very well go so much quicker and smoother, I'm thinking, if they are able to just see the children and determine they are in fact, not being abused or neglected.  Of course, even seeing the kids and touring your home, they might not be able to close the case right there on the spot, but they surely can do so quicker if they actually have that opportunity vs. being strung along and having to involve legal action. 

 

There are risks involved with letting CPS come inside your home and life unannounced, sure, but there are huge, huge, huge risks when child welfare is unable to determine whether or not the call they got is in fact a abuse case, where innocent children could be in immediate danger. 


I don't disagree with you, you're just operating from a starting point that's one step ahead of me. You're operating from the assumption that everyone involved agrees that the people standing on the porch are, in fact, CPS workers, and I'm saying ... how do we know? A badge or other form of ID can easily be faked, especially since most people aren't familiar with what official CPS identification looks like, or really anything about how the investigation process works. It'd be nice if some effort were made to educate the general public on how to respond, especially when the penalty for my ignorance is that I'll suddenly appear suspicious enough to maybe have my children removed. 

 

For me, stranger at door + or - "official" looking identification = no entry until I can confirm that the person is who they say they are (maybe by calling whatever number I can find online for CPS and verifying that they are, in fact, launching an investigation on me, and that the people at the door are employed with them and assigned to my case). It would be foolhardy to just let someone in because they say they're with CPS.

 

So I guess I'm just starting there, at the beginning, where strangers appear at the door in the middle of an otherwise normal day. It sounds to me like some people are saying that if my immediate reaction to strangers at the door isn't to fling it wide open and invite them in, there's something suspicious about me, and that just sounds crazy to me. 

post #31 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post

I did not say that. My statement (below) was in direct response to Beanmum statement (further below).

 

It is not fear mongering to advise people to let CPS in; it is fear mongering to say not letting them in will result in their removal by the end of the day.

 



Right.  I got that. And it is correct that if CPS is concerned enough, they will remove a child by the end of the day, with a police officer.  It is not fear mongering.

 

post #32 of 143

I think there is some fear mongering going on here. I've had CPS called on me twice and a third time where CPS was involved because it was alleged that I had killed my unborn baby. In none of those circumstances did I grant access to my house. I let them see my child, but the laws in the US DO require a warrant for them to enter your home. Of course, they won't close the case until they see inside, so eventually you have to let them in, but it doesn't have to be the day they show up. I never had my kids removed, and the cases were closed. This was in two different states. So even if people who work for CPS are saying they will take your kids, no, they won't, necessarily, because I have experienced it firsthand. And I still maintain that a degree does not make someone an expert on childrearing. Of course there are some good childless caseworkers out there and of course there are situations where it's obvious to an idiot that the parents are not doing their job,, but you can't possibly know what it is to raise a child if you haven't actually done it. I was a live in nanny working over 70 hrs a week and it still wasn't like having my own. No,  I don't think someone knows better than me about my child just because she went to college, passed some tests, and scored high on her job interview. Sorry. No. Regardless, CPS can't take youkid away because you won't lte them in your house. I was accused of freaking murder of my own baby, and sexual abuse, and they didn't take my kids. Thank God, because imagine it was bad enough them stripping my kid naked and examining him, and otherwise traumatizing him, when it all turned out to be a lie. I don't blame them for that part; they were just doing their job. But I'm not there to make their job easier. I'm there to protect my kids, and that includes from well meaning people who are ultimately just going to further upset my child by barging in the house and interrogating him unannounced.

post #33 of 143

I'm sorry for all you have been through, waiting2bemommy, but I didn't see where anyone said they would automatically remove your kids if you refuse entry.  Just that it makes you appear a bit suspicious - which makes sense on some level, doesn't it?  I mean, look at it from another perspective, if you worked for child welfare and had reason to believe a kid was being abused.  If you went to make a welfare check and the family was defensive or even hostile, and not cooperative, it just might increase those red flags - rightfully so, or not.  The bottom line is the child's well-being, and I'm going to assume that the majority of children who are being neglected/abused are going to have parents who either do not answer the door when CPS arrives or they are not going to make the process easy when the social worker does gain access to their children/home. 

 

I do understand the fear of having your life turned upside down over false allegations - but really, that happens as soon as someone makes that call, whether you cooperate or not.  There are definitely some shady case workers (and probably just as many if not more supervisors - who are the ones who make the final decision regarding taking kids into custody or not) who don't do right by the kids or families.  Usually, though, their fault lies in leaving abused kids in homes which sadly can result in deadly consequences.  This has to happen more than parents being falsely accused and losing their kids to foster care, even temporarily, it just has to.  That all said, the system is broken in a lot of ways - this I am aware of.  CPS needs some major reform, at least here in the US.  Those out in the field who do the hard work, though, are usually not the ones to blame here.  They are just doing their job (which is really taxing, and they are often overworked and underpaid). 

 

Limabean - you have good questions, maybe APToddlerMama can answer them?  I don't know how you would identify someone as being legit, though I do know that even if you do let them into your home, they aren't likely to remove your children that same visit unless it's super imminent, AND, they have their supervisors go ahead, and that's when it's likely the police will be involved with a court order.  The police, for sure, you should be able to identify.  But, yeah, I can honestly say I don't know that I would be so trusting just to let some stranger into my home or to come in contact w/my children just b/c they said they have to.  So, obviously, I do understand the hesitance, but there has to be a way to work together with this government agency so that they can efficiently keep our children safe. 

post #34 of 143
I would like to point out that the OP specifically asked about Canada. The US is a totally different country, with different procedures and laws, and what they are are irrelevant to Canadian procedures and laws.
post #35 of 143

Please understandI said IF  there was a serious CONCERN.

 

I have said that many times. If there is a concern that you children are IN DANGER. And I said many times that its the CAS job to ensure your kids are SAFE.

 

Not that your friends called b/c you are cosleeping at 4. I said in danger.

 

 

"If they have probable cause to think that your child is in danger b/c of a reasonable suspicion given to them by a thrid party, they have the legal right to search and seize."

 

If it is a serious allegation, they return later with a warrent to remove your kids b/c they were unable to complete their investigation that your children were safe and their home was secure of any dangers. (Not clean, but safe). 

 

 

I can post the rest of my comments also since you seem to have missed them. I wont be accused of fearmongering b/c you have taken 1 post out of context.

 

"These people dont care about that. They have been called to ensure your kids are safe. Why not allow them to see that they are safe and you will cooperate any way you can to have the case closed.

 

Thank you LROM. I did work with CAS and did my foster parent training with them. I am well versed in how this works. I dont knw anyone who has said "No you can not see my kids whom you are sworn to protect b/c I should hav rights that keep my kids safety from being investiagted

 

Lack of access means the kids safety can not be verified

 

These people are comming b/c someone said your kids are being maltreated or abused.

 

If they have probable cause to think that your child is in danger b/c of a reasonable suspicion given to them by a thrid party, they have the legal right to search and seize.

 

Thats why CPS is there. The workers dont know you from Eve. If someone says that your abusing your kids, then they have to ensure your not. Its as simple as that." 

 

 

 

Please go back are reread the above from my posts.

 

 B/c I mentioned that if there was a call to investigate a serious concern and you do not comply and they were gievn a reasonable suspicsion that your kids are in danger, then they have the right to remove your children until they see that they are SAFE. Whihc is what I have said repeatedly.

 

You are fearmongering by not reading my posts thoroughly and implying something I never said. I wouldlike you to edit your posts that imply I said anything but what I bolded. You failed to read all my posts and then jumped on one to take out of context. That is unfair.

 

why in the world would I sit here and give bad advice?

 

Nevermind.  I always end up sorry when I go against my best judgement and reply to these thread with my professional expereince.

 

 

 


Edited by beenmum - 5/26/11 at 8:04am
post #36 of 143

Three good reasons I would not let CAS into the house if they showed up on my front doorstep:

 

1. When I worked in law, the senior partners at my firm advised us to never, ever, voluntarily give up your rights. You can/should be perfectly pleasant in your refusal, but from a legal standpoint it is simply foolish to voluntarily give up your rights when a governmental authority asks to search your home or car or pressures you to voluntarily acede your rights in any other way.

 

2. It's never a good idea to let a stranger who shows up at your door unannounced into your home and around your children without witnesses and verification that they are who they say they are. Why assume honesty and good intentions of a complete stranger when your child's well-being is at stake? My feelings on this point are influenced by knowing a woman who was raped by a man pretending to be a police officer, but logic (and the newspaper) tell me that this isn't an uncommon ploy--the pretense of authority is an excellent tool for predators.

 

3. We work at home, school at home, and church at home. Our home is sacred, private space for our family. It is only open to people who we want there. Having someone force their way into our home against my will would feel like emotional rape. (And "inviting" in a social worker because I thought it was the lesser of two evils/a calculated risk to avoid the possibility of my child being taken away would be akin to false consent date rape.) The fact that the social worker may have the best of intentions would not make this any less of a violation. I won't let that happen if I can possibly avoid it.

post #37 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by beenmum View Post

Thank you LROM. I did work with CAS and did my foster parent training with them. I am well versed in how this works. I dont knw anyone who has said "No you can not see my kids whom you are sworn to protect b/c I should hav rights that keep my kids safety from being investiagted.

 

Shoudlnt happen. Ever.

 

And they CAN just come into your home. They do not need an invitation. IF you refuse, you will be put to the fdront of the caseload and you will have a judge signing to remove your kids before the end of the day.

 

seriously, telling the CAS that your home is too untidy to let them in, is foolhearty. You will be red flagged. They HAVE to investigate.



This is an entire post.  I did not take anything out of context, or re-arrange words.

 

You did not say in this post that if the concern were serious, etc, etc, kids would be removed.  You said they would be removed by the end of the day if you refuse to let CPS come into your house.

 

I am not going to edit unless asked to do so by a mod.

 

 

To be fair, in other posts you have said things about serious concern...so I am confused where you stand.  It could be the above post was written in haste (goodness knows I have done it) and you mean with serious concern - or it could be you mean exactly what you said above.

 

I would also like  a discussion on what constitutes serious concern to CPS or what should constitute serious concern.  Maybe that is another thread though.  I think CPS should be allowed in if the allegation is something that is putting your childs immediate life in danger - not for something like hoarding or bad hygiene, though.  I question whether a single report from a third party (particularly if it is not grave) should carry so much weight that it should over-ride my right to privacy.  I do take rights to privacy fairly seriously.  I also think it is very unlikely a judge would remove children based on a single complaint of a non serious nature because I asked for an appointment or to see a warrant.  I think it mild and moderate matters - CPS would make an appointment or get a warrant.  In serious matters, CPS usually shows up with the cops, and as said above I think in very serious matters CPS and the cops can and should just go in.  I think the likelihood of a judge removing my kids  because I asked for a warrant or an appointment  is just as likely as the possibility of letting a CPS agent in only for them do their best to make a case against you.  I think both scenarios are unlikely - but both can happen.  Bad judges exist, as do bad (or overzealous or burnt out) CPS workers.  Pick your poison.  

 

In any event, I am not personally attacking you.  I am sure your heart is really, really good and you are giving out the best advice you have to give based on your experience.   I am simply trying to sort out if you have to let CPS in (which is very different from whether you should or not).  In some ways I think we are discussing different things.  

 

 

 

post #38 of 143

What I am interested in is how such a "chat" with kids would work. Do CPS workers specifically asked whether they are abused (a very leading question!) or do they just talk about every-day stuff, what the kids are into, what they like to eat, and so on?

post #39 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post

 

For me, stranger at door + or - "official" looking identification = no entry until I can confirm that the person is who they say they are (maybe by calling whatever number I can find online for CPS and verifying that they are, in fact, launching an investigation on me, and that the people at the door are employed with them and assigned to my case). It would be foolhardy to just let someone in because they say they're with CPS.

 

So I guess I'm just starting there, at the beginning, where strangers appear at the door in the middle of an otherwise normal day. It sounds to me like some people are saying that if my immediate reaction to strangers at the door isn't to fling it wide open and invite them in, there's something suspicious about me, and that just sounds crazy to me. 

 

Good points, it would not have occurred to me someone might pretend to be a CPS worker. And of course, calling a number they provide themselves would not do much good if that were the case.
 

 

post #40 of 143

Even in the post I said "safety".

 

The  law is this:

 

 

If they have probable cause to think that your child is in danger b/c of a reasonable suspicion given to them by a thrid party, they have the legal right to search and seize.

 

You wont know what the call was about. They will simply tell you that there has been a call regarding your childs safety or wellbeing. Can we please discuss this issue with you. We will need to speak to the children also".

 

If its non serious, asking them to return later with a warrent is going to red flag you. Its not going ot help you in anyway. B/c now the CAS worker has to 1. GO to the school to speak to your kids 2. Get a police officer to get entrance or 3. Get a warrent to remove your kids.

 

Note that that CAS worker wont leave to do the follwing. That CAS worker will remain until one of the 3 above happens. This is o you dont flee b/c NOW you have refused acces to your kids, they have no clue if your kids are safe...or if you are mentally unwell and are planning on fleeing with them or killing them.

 

 

So, if they are comming to your home, I would let them in, find out what the concern is and deal with it. They dont care if your house is messy. I can not STRESS that enough. Unless its unsafe, your golden.

 

CAS workers dont want to see a unlived house when there are 2 toddlers there. They want to see that your kids have toys and have your attention rather then being shoved in a room all day long while you clean.

 

If you refuse and your kids arent there...depending on the nature of the call they will go to the school/daycare to speak to them.

 

If your kids are at home and you refuse them access and the nature of the call is a physical safety concern...if they can not see your children they can not confirm that your kids are unharmed. At that point they can go infront of a judge and ask for a warrent to remove your children until their safety is confirmed.

 

In my first year working with families at risk, 2 infants were murdered.

 

These workers have a helluva lot more important things to worry about then a messy house or a breastfeeding toddler. At one point or another they have seen kids die.

 

Remember that. They arent rushing in to take your kids. They want to know your kid isnt going to be another Rachel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › So what does CPS look for? Can they inestigate over any concerned call from someone? I'm in Canada.