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Can Your DC Ride a Bike? (Semantical Question)

Poll Results: Can your DC ride a bike?

This is a multiple choice poll
  • 56% (30)
    Yes, only if DC rides a two-wheeler without trainng wheels and with pedals.
  • 0% (0)
    Yes, if DC rides a two wheeler with training wheels.
  • 3% (2)
    Yes, if DC rides a balance bike.
  • 35% (19)
    Depending on DC's age, my answer would be different (as in, if DC is two, I would assume "riding a bike" to be one with training wheels, or a balance bike, or even a tricycle. If DC were 8, I would assume that asker is talking about a two-wheeler)
  • 3% (2)
    Other (please explain)
53 Total Votes  
post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

This is a question of semantics, not a poll on how many kids can ride a bike, so I put it in TAO.  Hope that's okay!

 

In short, the question is "Can your DC ride a bike?"  How would you answer?  I realize there are no "no" answers, because it's not a question of whether your kid can ride a bike or not, but rather what the definition of riding a bike is.  I guess.

 

Multiple choice.  I'll explain my thinking later ;)

 

And one more question, what do you think of when thinking "two-wheeler"?

post #2 of 15

Oh look, I'm first.

 

I answered "answer depends on the age" because my daughter is an at age where some kids are starting to ride without training wheels and she's not SUPER far from an age when the question was, "has she figured out how to pedal." 

 

To me, two wheeler means regular bike with pedals (not a balance bike because I have never actually seen a kid on one in real life nor heard mention of them outside of MDC) and no training wheels.

post #3 of 15
This question to me has always meant "Can you ride a pedaled two-wheeled bike without training wheels?"
post #4 of 15
I voted for the first one but then hit other when I was trying to hit submit..

Which works out because I wanted a qualifier on that first answer.

If I were talking about my child (hypothetically, because he is 2 and riding a trike, which we also call a bike) and someone asked me if he could ride a bike.. unless he was riding a regular two wheeled bike with no training wheels, I would follow it up with a clarification. like, yes, he can ride his bike WITH training wheels, or yes, but its a balance bike or whatever the case may be.

roundabout way to say: "riding a bike" to me means standard pedaled, two wheeled bike with no training wheels.
post #5 of 15

when i see 'ride a bike' no matter who it is, it translates to 'a regular bicycles without training wheels. 

 

if they asked me when dd was 2 i'd answer no she cant ride a bike yet but she can ride a tricycle or later when older i'd say - not yet. seh is still using her training wheels. 

 

ride a bike to me is a skill to be used forever as an adult. 

post #6 of 15

If someone would say that their child has learned to ride a bike I would think they were saying a regular 2 wheel bike with pedals and no training wheels.  

If the child was 16 or something then I might ask what kind of bike they were talking about.

If they said, "my child is riding her bike now," I think it could depend on age what kind of bike I would think of.

 

My dd can not ride any bike as we do not have one for her.

post #7 of 15

Aw, man, now I'm all disappointed because I thought I was going to get to brag about my little boy who's been riding a two-wheel bike with no training wheels since 2 weeks after he turned 3.  Oh, look, I did it anyway.  orngbiggrin.gif

post #8 of 15

I assume they mean a two-wheeler bike without training wheels. If my kid is 2 and someone asks me that question, they probably don't mean that since there aren't many 2-year-olds who can do that, but I'd still qualify my answer by saying something like, "She can ride a trike" instead of just saying, "Yes" and assuming they meant a trike because of her age. 

post #9 of 15

 

Without reading any posts.....

 

I think "riding a bike" means independently riding a two-wheeled cycle without training wheels. "Bike" = bicycle, which by definition is a two-wheeler ("bi" = two). 

 

If my child used training wheels on the bike, I'd probably explain that's the case, if it was at all relevant to the conversation. 

 

If someone said that their child was riding a bike, and it turned out that s/he used training wheels, I don't think it would register as misleading or untruthful or anything like that.  

 

I guess if it was an older child or teenager, I might ask if the bike was motorcycle or dirt bike, rather than a pushbike. 

post #10 of 15

Other, sort of. Really I'd only answer yes if it was a two-wheeler with no training wheels.

 

But IRL, before then, I'd qualify my "no". E.g. "not yet, but she goes along super fast on her balance bike." or something

post #11 of 15

Can your dc ride a bike means just that to me. Can said child get on a bike of some type and ride it. This includes training wheels, tricycles, balance bikes, hell even motorcycle since the most specific the question gets is "bike".

post #12 of 15
Am I the only one wondering what the heck a balance bike is?
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by becoming View Post

Am I the only one wondering what the heck a balance bike is?


A balance bike is a two wheeler with no pedals. The idea is that it focuses on learning to balance on the bike before learning to pedal.

 hudora_balance_bike_blue.jpg

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post

Can your dc ride a bike means just that to me. Can said child get on a bike of some type and ride it. This includes training wheels, tricycles, balance bikes, hell even motorcycle since the most specific the question gets is "bike".


See, I guess I'm just really nitpicky. I could never call a tricycle a "two-wheel" vehicle, which is what bi-cycle means. Bi means two. Tri means three. I'm okay with it though, my family still loves me even though I drive them crazy with these kinds of details. redface.gif

 

 

post #15 of 15

I also voted for a 2-wheeler with pedals and without training wheels. If somebody asked me if DD knows how to ride a bike, I would answer, "No, she still has training wheels." However, if the same person calls and asks what is DD doing at that moment, I may say, "Oh, she is outside riding her bike", without qualifying the statement.

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