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Leaning toward vegetarianism... advice?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I rarely eat meat, but when I do, I can't help being repulsed by the fact it's the flesh of a dead animal. Just the thought of eating the muscle of an animal makes my stomach turn. However, there are times when I crave it, I mostly crave a rare grass-finished steak from a local farm. Without getting into all the fancy lingo 'conscious meat-eaters' use when it comes to what the animal should be fed, how they should be treated, etc... I'll just say, I have a hard time letting meat go-

 

1) because I've been told type 0- blood type needs meat to thrive (I've also been told this is a myth)

2) my ancestors were hunters and ate buffalo meat, I've grown up eating homemade elk jerky, etc. And my ancestors were a peaceful people, thanking the animals, the Great Spirit, etc for the life-sustainance they acquired from the bison (so it's a cultural attachment for me also)

3) my cravings and my natural instinct to eat meat when my body signals it (although I know this has a lot to do with the toxins in the blood causing unhealthy cravings, etc)

4) because some well-respected physicians and nutritionists recommend some meat in the diet (Dr Mercola, etc)

 

So, as you can tell I'm on the fence. I've had an urge for quite some time now to begin a plant-based raw food diet and have been tinkering with the idea of vegetarianism/veganism but I'm having a hard time transitioning completely. I'm mainly feeling it's part of a spiritual transition for me as well as overall health and wellbeing.

 

I know I'm posting this in a forum of 'seasoned' vegetarians, so forgive me if any of this sounds naive!

 

Looking for advice and suggestions. Thank you!


Edited by jazzybaby9 - 5/27/11 at 5:50pm
post #2 of 11

I hope this doesn't sound rude but one thing that turned a lot of people I know from being meat eaters into vegetarians was taking anatomy and physiology classes. At my school we have cadaver labs and about six students out of twenty four turned vegetarian after the second week! I think a few went back to being meat eaters after the class ended. It just might be what you need to push you over the edge you know. It really is amazing how similar we are to them animals once you remove the surface layer...

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

I've taken several A&P courses, actually... I'm a massage therapist and student midwife... in massage school we had around 8 or so cadaver labs, etc...

post #4 of 11

On June 11, 1984 I decided to try being a vegetarian for a week. I figured if I could do it for a week, I'd know if I could do it or not. So, you can see I'm coming up on 27 years as a vegetarian.

 

Sometime in the mid to late 80s my new dentist was looking inside my mouth and asked, "Are you a vegetarian?" It was a rather odd time to be asked that, but I did the best I could to answer yes with his hands in my mouth. He said that he could always spot a vegetarian because their gums are so healthy...What I have heard is the health of your gums indicates the health of your internal organs.

 

The only hard part of becoming a vegetarian, for me, was giving up my mom's chicken and dumplings. For years I craved it. But decided that the sacrifice was worth the greater goal. Now I can't even remember what they tasted like and I haven't craved it for...probably a couple decades. Actually, I grew up thinking my mom was a great cook. Now I can't stand the food she makes. It's all overcooked (she calls it tender) and bland.

 

When I was 43 and about 30 weeks pregnant we climbed the Astoria, Oregon tower. 164 steps takes you up 125 feet. I climbed to the top, looked around, and climbed down. Near the bottom I passed a young man who was barely into the tower. He was huffing and puffing. I bet you he ate meat. I wanted to comment, "I'm 43 and pregnant, what's your problem?" but that would have been rude. I don't know if he made it to the top of the tower. I went on to give birth to a healthy term baby with a total of four hours of labor. All without eating meat.

 

Oh, a number of years ago I had to stop working in the ICU nursery. It had just gotten too emotionally painful. But I really missed the excitement and the adrenaline of caring for dying babies. (Sick, but true. ICU workers have to be adrenaline junkies.) I went and saw the movie, "The Doors." It was a huge adrenaline feast. I left there stoked and wanting to bring adrenaline back into my life. I thought, "I want to eat meat." Gasp. Horrors. Unbelievable. I ate a pizza with double cheese instead. (I hope you find that story as funny as I do.)

 

I don't buy the blood type thing. I'm O+ so supposedly should eat lots of meat and avoid beans. (I just read that.) Give me a break. I'm sorry if I come across as disrespectful here, but I just find it ludicrous. 

 

You couldn't tell by looking at my blonde hair and blue eyes that I'm part Cree. My ancestors ate a diet appropriate for their time and place and now I eat a diet appropriate for my time and place.

 

So, you can be VERY healthy being a vegetarian. You can also talk yourself out of eating meat if you are craving it. It's all about making a choice.

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SundayCrepes View Post

On June 11, 1984 I decided to try being a vegetarian for a week. I figured if I could do it for a week, I'd know if I could do it or not. So, you can see I'm coming up on 27 years as a vegetarian.

 

Sometime in the mid to late 80s my new dentist was looking inside my mouth and asked, "Are you a vegetarian?" It was a rather odd time to be asked that, but I did the best I could to answer yes with his hands in my mouth. He said that he could always spot a vegetarian because their gums are so healthy...What I have heard is the health of your gums indicates the health of your internal organs.

 

The only hard part of becoming a vegetarian, for me, was giving up my mom's chicken and dumplings. For years I craved it. But decided that the sacrifice was worth the greater goal. Now I can't even remember what they tasted like and I haven't craved it for...probably a couple decades. Actually, I grew up thinking my mom was a great cook. Now I can't stand the food she makes. It's all overcooked (she calls it tender) and bland.

 

When I was 43 and about 30 weeks pregnant we climbed the Astoria, Oregon tower. 164 steps takes you up 125 feet. I climbed to the top, looked around, and climbed down. Near the bottom I passed a young man who was barely into the tower. He was huffing and puffing. I bet you he ate meat. I wanted to comment, "I'm 43 and pregnant, what's your problem?" but that would have been rude. I don't know if he made it to the top of the tower. I went on to give birth to a healthy term baby with a total of four hours of labor. All without eating meat.

 

Oh, a number of years ago I had to stop working in the ICU nursery. It had just gotten too emotionally painful. But I really missed the excitement and the adrenaline of caring for dying babies. (Sick, but true. ICU workers have to be adrenaline junkies.) I went and saw the movie, "The Doors." It was a huge adrenaline feast. I left there stoked and wanting to bring adrenaline back into my life. I thought, "I want to eat meat." Gasp. Horrors. Unbelievable. I ate a pizza with double cheese instead. (I hope you find that story as funny as I do.)

 

I don't buy the blood type thing. I'm O+ so supposedly should eat lots of meat and avoid beans. (I just read that.) Give me a break. I'm sorry if I come across as disrespectful here, but I just find it ludicrous. 

 

You couldn't tell by looking at my blonde hair and blue eyes that I'm part Cree. My ancestors ate a diet appropriate for their time and place and now I eat a diet appropriate for my time and place.

 

So, you can be VERY healthy being a vegetarian. You can also talk yourself out of eating meat if you are craving it. It's all about making a choice.


Right you are. You didn't come off disrespectful at all, straight to the point and I like that.

 

I've heard the blood type thing and I've also heard it's bullshit- which I stated in the original post. 

 

Thank you for your input, it definitely helped me make up my mind.

 

 "I'm 43 and pregnant, what's your problem?" but that would have been rude. -LOL!!!

 

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

And what's with everyone replying to this posting feeling as if they're being rude? Hmm...

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzybaby9 View Post

And what's with everyone replying to this posting feeling as if they're being rude? Hmm...



People get really defensive about NOT being vegetarians.

post #8 of 11
Quote:

Originally Posted by jazzybaby9 View Post

Thank you for your input, it definitely helped me make up my mind.


Makes me feel good that I helped you clarify your thoughts.

post #9 of 11

Hi there

 

I think your question, and struggle, is a common one. I definetly can relate. I stopped eating meat about 20 years ago (I'm 29, so that would be age 9 or so :) ). I had the same feeling; at the time, I didn't even have the vocabulary to explain my feelings about it, I just knew that eating flesh was not right for me. Now I am feeling a stronger and stronger pull towards veganism, and frankly, it scares me a little, maybe I am now having the same feelings you are.

 

I guess my advice would be this:

 

1: Since you feel compelled, try going veg for a short period of time, see how you feel.

2: forget the blood type / ethnicity / "experts" stuff, just listen to what your body is telling you. You are more than the sum of your blood type and ethnicity.

 

post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SundayCrepes View Post





People get really defensive about NOT being vegetarians.



Really? That's strange. After all, it is a personal choice. But I have known some vegetarians who have a superiority complex.

post #11 of 11

Hi! I went veg for similar reasons that you are leaning towards it. Meat grossed me out, and the thought of eating an animal made me sick. After a few weeks of going vegetarian I felt amazing, and much lighter, emotionally and spiritually. I think listening to your body and what it likes and doesn't like is key. I found after a month or 2 after not eating meat, the cravings for it went away completely. I say, give it a shot.. a least a good month or two. See how you feel, how your body responds and make up your mind from there. :)

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