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begging for treats, power struggles and the constant chattering..............argh!

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

My dd is honestly a true joy most of the time, as she is getting older she is getting just

 

better and better and she was really a very happy easy baby for the most part (teething

 

was AWFUL as were the GERD and sensory issues and baby-frustration that she seemed

 

to feel like she was almost trapped in her body and now that she can use it and

 

communicate things are light-years better.)

 

But there are a few behavior related issues that I don't know how to get over or deal with from a GD perspective.

 

1. I definately set her up for thinking that treats were the norm, maybe on a daily basis even, but I am working through the issues that led me down that path and I have started to say  no a lot more.  I hate saying no so much.  I want to say yes a whole lot more and as a mom you kinda already have these built in no scenarios and then this on top of it feels almost crushingly constant.  And she asks so nicely the first time, but then no isnt good enough and she asks, then begs, then tantrums........it's so ugly and exhausting and I seem to have no tools for it.  Help!

 

2. The power struggles over meal time are getting increasingly bad.  I am not interested in cooking her seperate meals consisting of only food she likes, I don't like the fact that she gets up about 20-100 times during just dinner alone, I don't like that I can't give her a complete meal without her picking only the things she wants to eat and leaving the rest (example: I make spaghetti, meatballs, garlic bread and peas....she eats only the meatballs and then says she is full and comes asking for a snack 30 mins later.)

 

3. This one has to wear me down quiker than anything else:  The constant chattering.  From the moment she wakes up to the moment she finally stops fighting sleep she is talking/singing/repeating sounds/words/noises and it makes me feel like I am going crazy to have this non-stop soundtrack.  I feel guilty that it drives me so berserk but it is what it is and it does.  Advice????  Please help me with this one!!!

 

BTW she is 3, did I say that?  She is VERY bright, VERY verbal and just a doll most of the time.

 

Thank you so much!

post #2 of 21

I am not sure about number one because I don't deal with treat issues with my dd.  I will say that three was the worst age for my dd and I have noticed that many people have a lot to say about how hard three is for them also.  Implementing change, especially when it is decreasing something that your child really loves to have, may be harder than it would have been when she was younger so you should try to steel yourself for tantrums that come with staying mostly firm on that change by making sure you are getting your needs met.  It is hard enough to parent a child who is whining for something when you have all your needs met, if you are tired, hungry, in need of alone time, etc... and trying to parent calmly it just isn't going to be very easy (and IME it doesn't often work out well). 

 

For two I would make at least one thing my dd liked at each meal and allow her to eat what she ate without any pressure.  I always put some of everything on her plate and modeled eating it, but I didn't force the food on her.  I found that if I made sure she was hungry at mealtime she was more willing to try new things, if she was not hungry and especially if she had gone past her hunger tolerance level she just wasn't.  I had to get to a place where I was okay with the waste, but after seeing it on her plate several times my dd would begin to try the new things.  I would offer a simple to prepare healthy snack from a food group that my dd didn't have at dinner if she came back a little while after eating only corn and asking for food (cheese, bread with butter, an apple, carrot sticks, cold edamame, boiled egg, yogurt).  I briefly got into a cycle of offering dessert then, but I figured out very quickly that she was acting stuffed full because she knew I would give her dessert in a few minutes.

 

For number 3 what helps me is a couple hours to myself.  We would rent some Strawberry Shortcake, Elmo, or Dora and I would sit next to her and read while she watched the movie.  I also had taught my dd to not talk to me much until after I had my first cup of coffee.  The fifteen minutes after I wake up are mine to relax.  If possible you may want to try waking up fifteen minutes before your child so you can have a few minutes of calm before the day begins.

 

 

post #3 of 21

If it weren't for  the fact that my DS is standing here talking my ear off I would be wondering how you got a hold of my kid!

 

I had an entire response typed out and then I accidentally killed the tab (duh.gif) so if this seems scatterbrained that's why.

 

The only advice I have is for tantrums/treats.  We often fall into a treat rut with BuggaBoo.  What works best for us is to first sit down and explain why the treats are stopping.  In our case it's refined sugar since it seems to make his behavior worse.  We then tell him what kind of treats he can have, but emphasize that treats happen rarely.  I haven't figured out if rationing works better than cold turkey yet, but I've tried both.  Actually, now that I think about it I think cold turkey has worked best.  If I let him have one treat a day then his whole day becomes focused on that treat, and after he's had it he'll still ask for one.

 

When the inevitable tantrums occur this is how we handle it.  We define "fits" in our house as screaming, stomping, hitting, or kicking.  When BuggaBoo starts throwing a fit I tell him, "you are starting to throw a fit.  Remember, we throw fits in our rooms.  Do you need to go to your room?"  He never says yes, but if his actions continue I'll pick him up and put him in his room, saying, "You can throw your fit in here.  When you're calm come back out."  I try to say this as neutrally as possible so that it's not a punitive punishment but rather giving him a safe place to cool off. 

 

I cannot handle him throwing fits around me, I start to see red.  I was raised is an abusive situation where my father didn't let us even cry, so even though it may not be entirely GD it's the best I can do right now.

 

For the other number two, shrug.gif.  Call me when you figure that one out.  I'm dealing with him asking for food, being excited while I make it, and then not eating it.  It drives me batty!  We have a tight food budget ($130/month for the four of us) and I can't abide him wasting stuff.

 

For number three, hat's hard.  He never stops talking, but it's the "WHYS?" that get on my nerves the most.  I'll turn the question back onto him if it's something easily observed ("Mommy, why are you making food?"  "Well, why do you think?"), but BuggaBoo hates that, so that will sometimes be more power struggles.  I'm really trying to raise him to think for himself.

 

Another thing I'll do if he starts into a strings of "Whys?" (What are you doing?  Why?  Why?...) is after I've answered enough questions for my patience I'll say, "The end!"  He knows that means the end of that line of questioning.  He doesn't like it, once again it seems to be another power struggle, but he's learning to respect it.

 

To save my sanity I often let the kidlets run around in our backyard, but I know that's not feasible for everyone.  Something that has helped out recently is reading the book, "Raising Your Spirited Child" by Mary Sheedy Kurcinka.  It not only helped me figure out BuggaBoo's temperament it helped me realize mine and how I react to situations.  Also, it helped me understand The Hubby better than I have since, well, ever, so, bonus!

 

With BuggaBoo it's awfully tempting to put in a movie for him, since when that happens he's actually silent, but I pay for it later.  His behavior just disintegrates after watching any sort of media, he certainly gets overstimulated.  It may not be the case for your DD.

 

Finally, to end this novel (if you're still here, thank you!), one more observation from my life.  I'm pretty depressed right now and I'm trying to figure a lot of stuff out for myself.  It seems most days I don't have a lot to give to my kids.  So I guess my last piece of advice is to see if you have personal issues that are contributing to lack of patience, etc.

 

Best of luck!

 

post #4 of 21


For the treats, have you thought about allocating a certain number of treats for the week.  Use stickers, chips, whatever...that she can turn in on a treat...and when those are gone, no more treats until next week.  That way, she's in control.

 

Special meals...look at Ellyn Satyr's work.  It's your job to supply healthful food, it's her job to decide how much to eat.  As long as the meal contains one thing she'll eat (even bread and butter), then you're fine.  We usually allow one time to leave during dinner for the bathroom whatever, but after that.... you're done.  Remove the plate and the meal's over if she gets up over whatever limit of times you set.  If you're consistent, it won't last long.

 

 

Chattering...no ideas on that one. :)  Sorry.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dauphinette View Post

My dd is honestly a true joy most of the time, as she is getting older she is getting just

 

better and better and she was really a very happy easy baby for the most part (teething

 

was AWFUL as were the GERD and sensory issues and baby-frustration that she seemed

 

to feel like she was almost trapped in her body and now that she can use it and

 

communicate things are light-years better.)

 

But there are a few behavior related issues that I don't know how to get over or deal with from a GD perspective.

 

1. I definately set her up for thinking that treats were the norm, maybe on a daily basis even, but I am working through the issues that led me down that path and I have started to say  no a lot more.  I hate saying no so much.  I want to say yes a whole lot more and as a mom you kinda already have these built in no scenarios and then this on top of it feels almost crushingly constant.  And she asks so nicely the first time, but then no isnt good enough and she asks, then begs, then tantrums........it's so ugly and exhausting and I seem to have no tools for it.  Help!

 

2. The power struggles over meal time are getting increasingly bad.  I am not interested in cooking her seperate meals consisting of only food she likes, I don't like the fact that she gets up about 20-100 times during just dinner alone, I don't like that I can't give her a complete meal without her picking only the things she wants to eat and leaving the rest (example: I make spaghetti, meatballs, garlic bread and peas....she eats only the meatballs and then says she is full and comes asking for a snack 30 mins later.)

 

3. This one has to wear me down quiker than anything else:  The constant chattering.  From the moment she wakes up to the moment she finally stops fighting sleep she is talking/singing/repeating sounds/words/noises and it makes me feel like I am going crazy to have this non-stop soundtrack.  I feel guilty that it drives me so berserk but it is what it is and it does.  Advice????  Please help me with this one!!!

 

BTW she is 3, did I say that?  She is VERY bright, VERY verbal and just a doll most of the time.

 

Thank you so much!



 

post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 

Wow, I seriously could have written this, lol.  I mean everything.

The sugar does it make it worse for her but I guess it's my own issue that I feel bad or guilty that she just can't really ever have sugar so I think I over compensate and by that I don't mean that she gets tons of treats but I really really belive in my heart that she would be better off with no sugar and then I sabotage that.

I also see red when dd throws a fit so I am going to try what you do.  I think it will work because she is a very attahed kid and hates to be far from me so I think that would be a good motivator for her to straighten out, I will just have to really work on saying it and acting out with a neutral tone.

About the depression, I too am depressed and trying to figure a lot of things out for myself so I am feeling spent emotionally a lot of the time as well.

geez, we need to start a support group, lol!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazurii View Post

If it weren't for  the fact that my DS is standing here talking my ear off I would be wondering how you got a hold of my kid!

 

I had an entire response typed out and then I accidentally killed the tab (duh.gif) so if this seems scatterbrained that's why.

 

The only advice I have is for tantrums/treats.  We often fall into a treat rut with BuggaBoo.  What works best for us is to first sit down and explain why the treats are stopping.  In our case it's refined sugar since it seems to make his behavior worse.  We then tell him what kind of treats he can have, but emphasize that treats happen rarely.  I haven't figured out if rationing works better than cold turkey yet, but I've tried both.  Actually, now that I think about it I think cold turkey has worked best.  If I let him have one treat a day then his whole day becomes focused on that treat, and after he's had it he'll still ask for one.

 

When the inevitable tantrums occur this is how we handle it.  We define "fits" in our house as screaming, stomping, hitting, or kicking.  When BuggaBoo starts throwing a fit I tell him, "you are starting to throw a fit.  Remember, we throw fits in our rooms.  Do you need to go to your room?"  He never says yes, but if his actions continue I'll pick him up and put him in his room, saying, "You can throw your fit in here.  When you're calm come back out."  I try to say this as neutrally as possible so that it's not a punitive punishment but rather giving him a safe place to cool off. 

 

I cannot handle him throwing fits around me, I start to see red.  I was raised is an abusive situation where my father didn't let us even cry, so even though it may not be entirely GD it's the best I can do right now.

 

For the other number two, shrug.gif.  Call me when you figure that one out.  I'm dealing with him asking for food, being excited while I make it, and then not eating it.  It drives me batty!  We have a tight food budget ($130/month for the four of us) and I can't abide him wasting stuff.

 

For number three, hat's hard.  He never stops talking, but it's the "WHYS?" that get on my nerves the most.  I'll turn the question back onto him if it's something easily observed ("Mommy, why are you making food?"  "Well, why do you think?"), but BuggaBoo hates that, so that will sometimes be more power struggles.  I'm really trying to raise him to think for himself.

 

Another thing I'll do if he starts into a strings of "Whys?" (What are you doing?  Why?  Why?...) is after I've answered enough questions for my patience I'll say, "The end!"  He knows that means the end of that line of questioning.  He doesn't like it, once again it seems to be another power struggle, but he's learning to respect it.

 

To save my sanity I often let the kidlets run around in our backyard, but I know that's not feasible for everyone.  Something that has helped out recently is reading the book, "Raising Your Spirited Child" by Mary Sheedy Kurcinka.  It not only helped me figure out BuggaBoo's temperament it helped me realize mine and how I react to situations.  Also, it helped me understand The Hubby better than I have since, well, ever, so, bonus!

 

With BuggaBoo it's awfully tempting to put in a movie for him, since when that happens he's actually silent, but I pay for it later.  His behavior just disintegrates after watching any sort of media, he certainly gets overstimulated.  It may not be the case for your DD.

 

Finally, to end this novel (if you're still here, thank you!), one more observation from my life.  I'm pretty depressed right now and I'm trying to figure a lot of stuff out for myself.  It seems most days I don't have a lot to give to my kids.  So I guess my last piece of advice is to see if you have personal issues that are contributing to lack of patience, etc.

 

Best of luck!

 



 

post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 

I am going to try the reward system idea.  I think it will easiy fit into the star chart we already do, actually.  We use a star chart to track her daily behavior on things like listening/brushing teeth/not tantruming etc. and she gets stars that add up to a big treat.  Last time it was build a bear workshop, this time is will be a gondola ride in city park (both her choices).  She also get an allowance of spare change to feed her "piggie" so what I am thinking is she can now start to use the change for treats like going to starbucks for juice and madelines or going to tutti frutti for fro-yo and when the change is gone the treats are done til the next week.  That sounds great and she willoe picking where she wants to go and feeling like a big girl paying for her treats.  THANKS so much for this empowering idea :)

 

And about the meals I will also give that a try, one time up =ok, after that food gets wrapped up for evening snack time.  (I can't stand to waste the dinner food)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by umsami View Post


For the treats, have you thought about allocating a certain number of treats for the week.  Use stickers, chips, whatever...that she can turn in on a treat...and when those are gone, no more treats until next week.  That way, she's in control.

 

Special meals...look at Ellyn Satyr's work.  It's your job to supply healthful food, it's her job to decide how much to eat.  As long as the meal contains one thing she'll eat (even bread and butter), then you're fine.  We usually allow one time to leave during dinner for the bathroom whatever, but after that.... you're done.  Remove the plate and the meal's over if she gets up over whatever limit of times you set.  If you're consistent, it won't last long.

 

 

Chattering...no ideas on that one. :)  Sorry.

 

 



 



 

post #7 of 21

RIght there with you!

I have a 3 year old and am going through the same EXACT stuff!

The treats thing is new. He asks for them often but I have no problem telling him no and offering something healthy instead- letting him know that treats are for special times (like parties and vacations, etc. ) and at all other times we are expected to eat healthy.

WIth meals we just encourage him to at least try one bite of everything on his plate. 

SOmetimes we make a game of it. I tell him to close his eyes and open his mouth and see if he can guess which food from his plate I gave him a bite of. Sometimes it's just one thing, other times I put a few different foods in one bite and see if he can guess which combinations I chose. This actually works really well for us. 

Also I try to make snacks before meals as healthy as possible. Right now both of mine love having a little cup full of frozen veggies while dinner is cooking (ex. -peas and corn). Something small so they aren't filling up and something healthy.

With the chatter.... I don't really have a solution but I was having this exact thought this morning!

I just turned on the music in the kitchen while I cleaned up after breakfast and I tried to keep them entertained with something in the living room. There were many interuptions but ...that's to be expected, I guess. My most irritating time for this is first thing in the morning. It starts right away-there's no quiet time. That first cup of coffee in the morning is always such a big help for me! :)

So, I may not have helped much here, but at least you know you're not alone. And if you're at all like me- that helps :)

post #8 of 21

I am right there with you. My DD is such a chatter box! We will be riding in the car and my DH will say, "wow! she talks non stop!" blahblah.gif And I just smile.

Anyways... I just had a little suggestion for you about meal times. We have tried to include our DD in on meal planning. I meal plan each week what we will be having for dinner. So she gets to help pick out ideas and is totally in on the planning. This way she feels like she has some sense of control. She is very strong willed and an independent thinker. So when it comes to the meals if she got to help decide what was for dinner then when it comes time to eat I gently remind her that this was her idea then meal time gets a little easier. Hope this helps a little. 

post #9 of 21

I'm in the same boat with my 3yo. I'm still trying to figure #1 out. But for #2, grow a garden if you can and let her help you cook as much as she can. It's so much fun and if your child is involved in growing the plants, she'll be much more likely to eant to eat them. My DD loves the beans we grow, but won't touch them if they're from a can!

And as for the chatter, I have realized that when DD starts getting sleepy, she gets more talkative to keep herself awake. So instead of answering her, I just tell her to hush or close her eyes.

post #10 of 21

Oh, one more thing on meals.  One thing that I have learned is don't assume your child will/will not like something.

 

DD, who is 3 almost 4, loves cucumber, tomatoes, aspargus, fish, eggplant, etc.  She's a vegetable fiend.  If I make a salad, and put it on the table, she'll pick out all of the tomatoes and cucumbers and eat them.  (The first time she did this, I thought I was going crazy... I kept thinking, "I thought I chopped up some tomatoes???" )  She does like the typical kid friendly food too.

 

My Mom made asparagus around Easter, and she asked me if the kids liked it.  I said, "They've never had it, but I don't think so." Well, all three of them loved it.  

 

I also have to make an effort to serve my kids things I don't like--so that hopefully they won't have my food prejudices/preferences. :)  (I don't like seafood, but 2/3 kids love it.  So I still try and cook it once every week or so.)

post #11 of 21

Haven't read the other replies, but I have a 4.5 yo DD, very verbal, very bright, very picky eater.


So what if she only eats meatballs at dinner? They're packed with protein and iron, and really, pasta isn't all that good for you. We ask her to eat her meatballs and some veggies. I let her pick out the veggie and "help" in the kitchen - that goes a long way.

 

I can and will invoke the 2-minutes-of-silence rule. DD1 knows that sometimes she talks too much. And just wait until 4.5, when she starts making up her own language and she's just belting out gibberish nonstop. It's "delightful."

 

Is she a rules follower? Mine is (thankfully). She never gets down from the table while we're still eating, except to use the bathroom or get more water.

 

It's much easier to say "we don't have any" than "no" to treats. Just don't bring it in the house. If you like to bake with her, find people to give the treats away to.

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by _betsy_ View Post

It's much easier to say "we don't have any" than "no" to treats. Just don't bring it in the house. If you like to bake with her, find people to give the treats away to.

 

Hey, that's a great tip!  Although, I would have to save some for us.  We'll just make sure they're super healthy.  We're going to be the most popular house on the block.
 

 

post #13 of 21

Sounds a lot like my 4 yo. 

 

What about healthy or non-food treats?  DD gets treats when shopping, but bubbles, crayons, or wearing chapstick are included in the treat bag.    We're working on being polite when she doesn't get something she wants.  Being disappointed is ok; screaming is not.

 

Meals -- Mine eats lots of hard-boiled eggs, yogurt and oatmeal.  Easy to make and have on hand so she'll eat something healthy, but also not preparing a separate meal.  If she gets up too much, I assume she's done, though I do warn her first.  Small portions so there's less to throw out and I'll also save leftovers for later.  If she's begging and I really think she's hungry later, I might let her finish her plate then.

 

Chatter -- PLEASE tell me what works!!!  It exhausts me.  Especially because she wants me to be different voices (MIckey mouse, humpback whale, Blue, the tickle monster......) and actually answer her.  Sometimes doing a couple at once. 

post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamatalks View Post

I am right there with you. My DD is such a chatter box! We will be riding in the car and my DH will say, "wow! she talks non stop!" blahblah.gif And I just smile.

LOL, i need to figure out how to keep my sense of humor about it because right now it is seriously drivin me nuts!

Anyways... I just had a little suggestion for you about meal times. We have tried to include our DD in on meal planning. I meal plan each week what we will be having for dinner. So she gets to help pick out ideas and is totally in on the planning. This way she feels like she has some sense of control. She is very strong willed and an independent thinker. So when it comes to the meals if she got to help decide what was for dinner then when it comes time to eat I gently remind her that this was her idea then meal time gets a little easier. Hope this helps a little. 

I want to like this idea but at the same time it seems daunting because I am already SO bad at meal planning and with one low carb person, one vegetarian and then dd its hard to synch it all up, y'know?  Any suggestions are of course welcome :)



 

post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 

We do do a garden and we also go to the farmers market but so far it has been about 50/50 on her reactions to the new foods and forget about the things she has a;ready decided she doesnt like :(

 And you are so right about the chattering increasing when she is tired as well as the fidgeting....but sometimes its not a good time to go to sleep like 5 p.m., lol!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kimmypoo View Post

I'm in the same boat with my 3yo. I'm still trying to figure #1 out. But for #2, grow a garden if you can and let her help you cook as much as she can. It's so much fun and if your child is involved in growing the plants, she'll be much more likely to eant to eat them. My DD loves the beans we grow, but won't touch them if they're from a can!

And as for the chatter, I have realized that when DD starts getting sleepy, she gets more talkative to keep herself awake. So instead of answering her, I just tell her to hush or close her eyes.



 

post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 

I agree on the pasta or realy any of the carbs, I just like her to always try new things.

I have started to say things like "Quiet time until we get home" or something like that and it works but I feel a little guilty like i'm being mean to her...

 

I do like baking with her and I try to make things as healthfully as possible so I freeze them and use them for breakfasts...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by _betsy_ View Post

Haven't read the other replies, but I have a 4.5 yo DD, very verbal, very bright, very picky eater.


So what if she only eats meatballs at dinner? They're packed with protein and iron, and really, pasta isn't all that good for you. We ask her to eat her meatballs and some veggies. I let her pick out the veggie and "help" in the kitchen - that goes a long way.

 

I can and will invoke the 2-minutes-of-silence rule. DD1 knows that sometimes she talks too much. And just wait until 4.5, when she starts making up her own language and she's just belting out gibberish nonstop. It's "delightful."

 

Is she a rules follower? Mine is (thankfully). She never gets down from the table while we're still eating, except to use the bathroom or get more water.

 

It's much easier to say "we don't have any" than "no" to treats. Just don't bring it in the house. If you like to bake with her, find people to give the treats away to.



 

post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by llwr View Post

 

Chatter -- PLEASE tell me what works!!!  It exhausts me.  Especially because she wants me to be different voices (MIckey mouse, humpback whale, Blue, the tickle monster......) and actually answer her.  Sometimes doing a couple at once. 

Wow mine would love me to do that but.....noooooooo!  That adds a whole new level to the nooooooooo.  I need waaaay more quiet waaay less chattering so I just don't even indulge it but then I feel so guilty!

 

 

post #18 of 21

Oh, yes, being different voices!  Or puppets!  Or anything like that!  It's like BuggaBoo is never filled, anything he enjoys he just takes and takes and it's never enough.  Nursing, interaction, favorite foods, I can give and give but if I say no he throws the same fit like I never gave him anything.  Like a PP said, it's exhausting.

 

Also, to throw a wrench in the works, if BuggaBoo doesn't like the food then he'll just make it up in nursing, which wears me out.  He honestly nurses 6-12 times a day still, and he's 3.5 yo.  So unless I wean him I don't know how to encourage him to eat what I serve him.  Erg.

 

Sorry to not offer any new advice, but I just needed to vent.  eyesroll.gif  Thanks, ladies.

post #19 of 21

Benjamin did all of those things. 

 

The begging for treats thing IME goes away when a treat is connected to something special, so for example we have ice cream on Sundays.  That's our ice cream day.  On Fridays he is allowed a fizzy drink with his dinner.  On holidays he allowed to have some candy.  We had to lay down the law, but after a week or two of clearly linked treats and consistent NOs with a calm demeanor and steady voice in the face of all the tantrums he stopped begging.  Now he only slips into the phases for a day or two after my mom leaves...she spoils him rotten!

 

I found that between the age of 3 and 5 it was best not ask him to sit through MY meal, so I gave him his meal first, while I was finishing the prep on his dad's and mine and then when we were ready to sit down, he was usually done. He then got to have his 30 minutes of a video or a computer game while we had our dinner and enjoyed the meal.  Now at 6 he can and will sit through a whole meal with us and even wait patiently until we are finished to ask for dessert.  At 3, when we were living with my MIL for a while, she'd always insist on him sitting at the table and I just felt it was really inappropriate to ask a child at that age to sit still, quietly, for 40  minutes. 

 

I also have no qualms with him leaving stuff on his plate.  I try to keep track of what he has eaten througout the day and as long a he is eating a wide array of foods, I don't stress.  Packing it up for a snack later for yourself or DH is a great idea,  I always put a little of everything on DS's plate because I think as long as you keep offering, that's the important part.  Sometimes he surprises me and eats something new...when he was a baby he ate anything, like his sister does now, from string beans to Thai green curry.  Then at about 2 or 3 he became a choosy eater...now he's working in foods again.  If he wants dessert, supper or a midnight snack he has to eat at least two things from his plate, either the protein and the veg or the protein and the carb.

 

As for the chatter...oh man some days he is like a wind up toy, non stop, but I try to have a sense of humor, and remember that there might come a day when he doesn't speak to me at all. and then I will be wishing he'd chatter away.  I try to...but then there are times when I say "go annoy your father for a little while, mommy needs some quiet time!"  I am also not above bribes for peace when I really need it...like for every minute you can play quietly by yourself, mommy and you will spend twice as many at the park feeding ducks and you can tell me all about your day, but I need a minimum of five minutes to start. 

 

Timers are also good for verbal breaks... Mommy has a headache and I  need a little bit of quiet time, so I am going to set this funny little chicken clock and when he cockadoodledoos we can do something fun, okay?  Kids that age have a hard time understanding time, and these visual and aural cues can really help them. 

 

 

post #20 of 21


 

Quote:

Originally Posted by dauphinette View Post 

 

haha don't get me wrong sometimes my DD drives me nuts too! You're not alone!

 

I sympathize with you on the meal planning because my DH is gluten intolerant! so planning meals can be a bit of a challenge sometimes. What I did way back when was create a list of meals that I know everyone in the family will eat. And then when it comes to meal planning we just consult the list and pick from the things we know everyone will enjoy. Meal planning has been the success of our grocery shopping trips and keeping our food budget on the low end and keeping me a bit more organized when it comes to the end of the day when its time to cook. When I meal plan I just choose what options we have for dinner for the week then either the night before or the day of depending on what mood we're all in we choose whats for dinner from the list. 

 

good luck! ;) 




 

 



 

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