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Have any of you heard of these Midwifery training programs?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hi Ladies!

 

I'm looking into starting a correspondence training program for midwifery.

 

Right now my two top options are Midwife To Be (midwifetobe.com) or Midwifery Institute of America (midwiferyinstituteofamerica.com).

 

Do any of you have experience or knowledge about either of these?

 

I know neither are MEAC accredited, but I think I've decided to start with the "book-learning" through one of these programs (or something similar) because they are VERY affordable and SO time flexible--yet still give me structure. Then I'll get to the clinical NARM PEP work when I have a firm start with the academics.

This is what I can tell so far from corresponding briefly with each school and from what I've heard/read other people say.

1) Midwife To Be. Seems more people have heard of it than have heard of MIA; and based on name recognition alone (not necessarily quality of the program), people recommend it to me. But I've not been impressed with what some have said about it, and I have reservations that it may not be very organized, professional or challenging. But that is just a "feeling."

2) Midwifery Institute of America. I can't seem to find out much about it, other than what it says about itself. The directer seems well put together and good at communication through email. And the course work looks very extensive; even including A&P modules and other things that the director includes to help train midwives who want to use midwifery overseas.

 

Anyway, I'd love to hear any thoughts!

 

Thank you!

 

post #2 of 16

I just registered for Midwives to Be and am looking at everything right now. My first thought is, wow, there is a lot to learn! I was looking at AAMI for quite a while, but cost is huge for us and I wanted to finally get started.

 

At this point, it looks pretty organized - probably because of the online format which kind of necessitates that. I like that it is a simple program with lots and lots of reading and the need for apprenticeship. 

 

Do you have any other training? I've taken all of the pre-nursing classes (before I discovered home birthing) so I've got a lot of the medical terminiology, A&P, micro and other stuff taken care of, which goes well with this program because she does say that it's a "piece-everything-together program." 

 

Let us know what you pick - whatever program you choose, it's awesome that you're going down this path!

post #3 of 16

I think you had commented on my other thread when I was looking for tips. These schools were my 2 I debated between. I ended up choosing self study, but after a week of that I decided that I'm not very good at it and I decided to go with Midwifery Institute of America.  I am still waiting on everything to come in the mail, but here is why I chose it:

1. The course outline seemed a little more thorough than MTB. I really liked the extra A&P and nutrition modules

2. The curriculum is Christian. I know the director of MTB is Christian, but I don't think there are any Christian modules.

3. It seems more hands off, which I preferred. MTB requires a lot of projects, some of them things like showing a video about homebirth at your local library. I didn't want to be required to do things like that when I'm already busy enough between my kids, school work, and apprenticing.

4. I spoke with a graduate who is doing mission work in Mexico and she said that she felt very well prepared for work in a third world country. I will be using my midwifery skills in third world countries so that appealed to me.

5. It is all book work and not online. For me, I'm kind of traditional with my learning and would much rather have a book in my hand and a pencil and paper. Plus, I love getting things in the mail lol!

Thats all I can think of. It was a hard choice though! I think MTB is a great choice if you want to be online and more involved with other students (they have a yahoo group and do weekly conference calls) and your community. Hope this helps! Let me know what you decide, I would love to have an email or facebook buddy to chat with about the MIA course work!

post #4 of 16

I'm a current Midwife To Be student.  I'm not 100% sure how I feel about the program quite honestly.  It's mainly reading.  You pay for your unit and you are given the code to access the unit online.  There is a TON of reading per unit.  Other than that, you do one project per unit (touring a lab, listing birth resources in your area, researching PKU laws, vaccine laws, ect...), do 40 hours of self-study per unit, and read one specific birth book (a list of like - 40 you'll use) and take a test on it.

 

 

 

Just to clarify an above statement - you don't have to show a homebirth video at a library - you have to do a community service project on midwifery in your community.  It could be passing out informative fliers, a video presentation, volunteer work, ect...  Just something to begin getting your name out.

post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by cinderella08 View Post

I'm a current Midwife To Be student.  I'm not 100% sure how I feel about the program quite honestly.  It's mainly reading.  You pay for your unit and you are given the code to access the unit online.  There is a TON of reading per unit.  Other than that, you do one project per unit (touring a lab, listing birth resources in your area, researching PKU laws, vaccine laws, ect...), do 40 hours of self-study per unit, and read one specific birth book (a list of like - 40 you'll use) and take a test on it.

 

 

 

Just to clarify an above statement - you don't have to show a homebirth video at a library - you have to do a community service project on midwifery in your community.  It could be passing out informative fliers, a video presentation, volunteer work, ect...  Just something to begin getting your name out.


Thats good to know. From what I read, I thought it was mandatory. I definitely think it can be a good thing to get involved and get your name out there, but if you already have an apprenticeship and small children it could be too much. If I didn't have all these other things going on, I would love to do a course like MTB just to be more involved. And I would so go on one of their Domincan Republic trips! I may try to get in a skills weekend sometime, I am from NC and go visit multiple times a year so I'm hoping to get some skills checked off there. Have you been to any skills weekends Amber? Did you like them?

 

I got all my stuff from MIA yesterday and I really like it so far. I only have a couple midwifery modules but she sent quite a few accompanying ones like A&P, scripture, and nutrition. It doesn't seem like it is going to be super intense, but that could all change when I go deeper into the midwifery modules. However, for someone who wants a hands off program that just gives some structure, I think this one is perfect.
 

 

post #6 of 16

Can anyone comment on "how Christian" MIA is? I am Catholic, but actually prefer not to associate with any religion as far as midwifery goes. I feel like that can get a little sticky and I just prefer to avoid it altogether.

 

Mostly just curious as to how religion plays a part in this particular curriculum.

post #7 of 16



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WildDoula View Post

Can anyone comment on "how Christian" MIA is? I am Catholic, but actually prefer not to associate with any religion as far as midwifery goes. I feel like that can get a little sticky and I just prefer to avoid it altogether.

 

Mostly just curious as to how religion plays a part in this particular curriculum.


The Christian part is a set of scripture modules that are separate from the others. The assignments are reading and copying down scriptures that are applicable to the work midwives do. Like today, I did scripture on righteousness. The director also points out certain things to meditate on and pray about. 

 

I guess it might be possible to skip the scripture modules, but really I don't think you can avoid it because the director obviously has a very strong relationship with Christ and from what I can tell, it is her ultimate goal to create Godly midwives. For me, and what I have seen of this school, midwifery and relationship with the Lord go hand in hand, and you'll get that tone throughout the entire course. So this might not be what you are looking for :) 
 

 

post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2littlebirds View Post



 


The Christian part is a set of scripture modules that are separate from the others. The assignments are reading and copying down scriptures that are applicable to the work midwives do. Like today, I did scripture on righteousness. The director also points out certain things to meditate on and pray about. 

 

I guess it might be possible to skip the scripture modules, but really I don't think you can avoid it because the director obviously has a very strong relationship with Christ and from what I can tell, it is her ultimate goal to create Godly midwives. For me, and what I have seen of this school, midwifery and relationship with the Lord go hand in hand, and you'll get that tone throughout the entire course. So this might not be what you are looking for :) 
 

 


Thanks! thumb.gif

 

post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 

oh wow! I've been away from this board for a little while and didn't realize I'd been getting replies! It's nice to see some feedback and conversation here. :D Thank you for everyone's input and comments. I'm very appreciative!

 

I don't have ANY previous training in this field (so i'm probably crazy).... but I'm hoping to take some science classes at the community college next semester. Right now I'm reading books (Like "Special Women" and "The Birth Partner") and and researching training to become a doula--to help me get my feet wet and have some opportunities to observe a few births before I delve into official midwifery training. I've been talking to some of my midwife friends and some other students and it seems everyone has a different opinion on "how to become" a midwife. (Which is no help to me! lol) I guess it just comes down to picking something that you think (*hope*) fits with your own life and schedule and then sticking with it! And like it's been mentioned before--"piecing" together your own training. If I had the money, I'd chose a MEAC accredited program; the thought of having to do PEP and then a NARM skills evaluation before even taking the exam intimidates me like no other! But I guess that there are plenty of women who do it this way. So it can be done!

 

Right now I think I'm just in the place of reading books on birth and midwifery and then searching my own heart. :) I think I hit the "there's no way I can do this" wall. But I still can't shake the desire to be a midwife. I'm just a little scared because I have a 1 1/2 year old daughter, and a husband, and I work part time (out of necessity) and I don't want to neglect my family in this process. How do people do apprenticeships and balance having a family? I'm kinda overwhelmed at the thought.

 

Ok so I went off topic from my own topic! I'm just rambling now. Thanks again for your comments! I think if I HAD to choose today I'd pick MIA--I'd study better with books and materials in my hand and not on a computer screen. I'd get too distracted doing other things--like this forum for example. lol

 

Anyway, goodnight for now. :D Thanks again!

 

 

post #10 of 16

Are all of the midwifery program web based? Is there an actual class I can attend instead of doing everything online? 

post #11 of 16
It depends on where you live and which approach you want to take. You could try a Google search for midwifery school with your zip code to see what comes up.
post #12 of 16
Hi ladies!

I'm new to this thread. I am interested in becoming a midwife. I live in the Dallas Texas area and was thinking about a correspondence course but I wasn't sure if that would allow me to qualify as a direct entry midwife? I was checking out Midwifery institute of America but I think I would like the online interaction. Does anyone have any pointers and can I get an apprenticeship locally? I feel a little lost and found this thread which has been helpful.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2littlebirds View Post


Thats good to know. From what I read, I thought it was mandatory. I definitely think it can be a good thing to get involved and get your name out there, but if you already have an apprenticeship and small children it could be too much. If I didn't have all these other things going on, I would love to do a course like MTB just to be more involved. And I would so go on one of their Domincan Republic trips! I may try to get in a skills weekend sometime, I am from NC and go visit multiple times a year so I'm hoping to get some skills checked off there. Have you been to any skills weekends Amber? Did you like them?

 

I got all my stuff from MIA yesterday and I really like it so far. I only have a couple midwifery modules but she sent quite a few accompanying ones like A&P, scripture, and nutrition. It doesn't seem like it is going to be super intense, but that could all change when I go deeper into the midwifery modules. However, for someone who wants a hands off program that just gives some structure, I think this one is perfect.
 

 

I know this is an old post, but I just returned to MDC and saw it.  I'm no longer in the MTB program.  I am pursuing midwifery as a Certified Nurse Midwife.

post #14 of 16
Hi! Yo
Quote:
Originally Posted by hjarboe View Post

Hi ladies!
I'm new to this thread. I am interested in becoming a midwife. I live in the Dallas Texas area and was thinking about a correspondence course but I wasn't sure if that would allow me to qualify as a direct entry midwife? I was checking out Midwifery institute of America but I think I would like the online interaction. Does anyone have any pointers and can I get an apprenticeship locally? I feel a little lost and found this thread which has been helpful.

Hi! You should check out the Association of Texas Midwives Training Program. Www.texasmidwives.com

And actually, you dont just have to be in Texas to attend this program- we have quite a few out of state students too! smile.gif
post #15 of 16

Hi! I'm new here and I know this thread is old but I'm hoping some of you guys can still help. I have been looking into the MIA courses! I was wondering if you had to buy any books for it or anything or does it come with all the stuff you need. Thanks for your help!! 

post #16 of 16

With every midwifery program I've looked into, there are quite a number of books that you have to buy. Honestly. you want to buy the books. There is a lot of studying that goes into becoming a midwife and you need to have good resources to study from.

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