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You might be a 'crunchy' parent if... - Page 5

post #81 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaoticzenmom View Post




I'll take Elmo over Caillou any day.  I used to run into the living room yelling "nnnooooo" as I changed channels away from Caillou.  The kids thought that was hilarious and would actively search for Caillou just to see me do my dramatic moves.

 



Ugh. DS1 used to watch Caillou occasionally, but I'd actually managed to mostly forget that he existed...until now...

 

post #82 of 218
Quote:

Originally Posted by mamayogibear View Post

 

Oh no, I named my dd's pet fish after a movie, how non-crunchy of me;)

 

 

I used to have a cat named Manic. He was named after the brother of Sonic the Hedgehog, from the old Sonic Underground cartoon. (My sister also had "Ranger", because her son and ds1 wanted her to call it "Power Ranger" and she compromised, and she had "Chocobo" from Final Fantasy. Our cats had weird names.)
 

 

post #83 of 218

1. When your LO looks around everytime you are in a public bathroom for the '(cloth) wipes' and then says upon exiting the stall "I used toilet paper because there were no butt rags, mama...."

 

2.  When your neighbors tell everyone that moves into the neighborhood that your the crazy chicken breeding family, the crazy veggies-growin-in-the-front yard family(as if that weren't apparent upon immediate inspection!), the crazy barefoot hippies the list goes on and on, lol

 

3. When you are always the one who has to explain "which hospital" dd was born at.....(UCed) at every new playgroup, meetup, church group etc., which ped. she goes to (none), why we didn't have her front teeth yanked out or caps put on (we did ozone and it worked SO well) and yes people do ask me these things unprompted and no I don't mind answering at all, and while it can feel a little "on the spot"ish no one has ever actually SAID anything rude to me after I answered but I have gotten some looks or mouths agape expressions, LOL!

 

4.  When even your friends think you are extreme or wierd but atleast they love and accept you anyway or better yet like it about you.

 

5.  When your little girl casually at play group plays "farmers market" instead of grocery store.

 

6.

 

I LOVE this thread and am genuinely turned off by the backlash to it.  I mean seriously? 

post #84 of 218
...when your child begs you to buy spinach at the store because he wants smoothies.

Though apparently he didn't love the smoothie I made tonight, because he told me he didn't think having veggies AND fruit was the best way to make it. Um, we *always* do veggies AND fruit. eyesroll.gif Actually, we've recently done fruit-only, but the whole point (IMO) is to make the large quantities of highly nutritious veggies fun and easy to eat. lol.gif
post #85 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by dauphinette View Post

I LOVE this thread and am genuinely turned off by the backlash to it.  I mean seriously? 


Yes, seriously. Here I try to articulate why, in a positive way and in an attempt to be non-judgmental.

 

http://www.mothering.com/community/forum/thread/1317731/how-i-have-been-humbled

 

post #86 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplerose View Post

Well I'd always heard it was bad, also dog manure is bad (or we'd have plenty of that with 3 labs lol). Now I can debunk people who say humanure can't be used! Thanks for the info :) This is the first year I haven't had a garden as I was in my first trimester during the time we'd usually plant everything and I just didn't have the energy. I miss it but I don't miss standing in the heat!

no no mama it is GOOD. human's not dogs. its called nightsoil and is the mainstay in many countries. i am not sure about the processing though.

 

and yes human pee too. v. v. v. good. diluted. just spray on ur veggies. both great fertilizers. 

 

and bone. ground up. bonemeal. not sure if ethics would allow the use of human bonemeal. 

 

and in fact blood too. dont know if you have ever noticed but anywhere a dead animal is buried the next year you see lush vegetation on the mound. 

 

does that mean diva cups should be emptied in the garden? winky.gif

 

oh yeah. chicken poop is GREAT too.

 

in my case i dont really get the crunchy comments, but boy oh boy do i get the 'weird' comment a lot (in a good way, not negative). at 8 i am not even sure what would be a 'crunchy' comment...

 

and ... only your child meemee would ask for that. 
 

dd's fav. food - roasted brocolli, cauliflower, kohlrabi and brussel sprouts in the oven drizzled with olive oil and at the end for dd lightly drizzled with maple syrup. 

 

pistachio icecream

 

dd stillllll prefers cosleeping

 

dd walks upto a nursing mom and tells her she just stopped nursing. 

post #87 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by eclipse View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by GuildJenn View Post





Blame Gwenyth Paltrow.




I blame Gwenyth Paltrow for everything.


Gwenyth Paltrow blames you for everything lol :p

post #88 of 218


I heard a guy on NPR or some other public radio thing, and he said that after a certain period of time (like, years?), all the pathogens would be gone from human poopies, or some such thing.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by purplerose View Post

Is human poop ok for gardening? I always heard it wasn't.

 

And if I had fake breasts(removable) I'm sure my dog would find and chew them up.



 

post #89 of 218

You know, it's funny. I totally understood the lighthearted nature of this thread. It reminded me of the Jeff Foxworthy "redneck" bits. But I do also understand where some of the dissenters are coming from.

 

I'm a newbie-crunchy. I was raised in a traditional, top-down, authoritarian, doctor-is-always-right world. When at age 43 I got pregnant and had gestational diabetes, I went, as I now call it, "into the system"---I was treated as high-risk because of my age and the g.d., and so I had more checkups and things than other people, and even though I started to change my ways (going so far as to get a doula and try to learn hypnobirthing techniques) it really all went out the window with the pain, so I committed the crime of (a) hospital birth (b) listening to doctors who said I was high risk (c) following their advice (d) accepting pain medication for contractions that were the most pain I've ever experienced; it was nightmarish, and (e) after a full weekend of labor, when my dear boy, my great big 10 lbs+ boy, got stuck and would not come out of me no matter how hard I pushed and he went into distress, I committed the final crime of having a C-section.

 

And I'll tell you what. They did an awesome and skillful job of it. I had a wonderful week of recovery in the hospital and they brought my healthy wonderful little son to me every time he needed to nurse, and waited on me hand and foot the rest of the time. We nursed from birth to, what was it, 3 y.o.? Anyway the story ended so well, but it hurts like hell STILL when I hear crunchy mamas talk about home birth and how great it is...I will never know if trusting my doctor was the right thing to do, or the wrong thing. Was I duped? Was having fear my ultimate crime? I don't know, but I don't feel like part of "the club" when this topic comes up, and I sincerely thought I was doing the right thing.

 

Maybe accepting the pain drugs was the self-fulfilling prophecy, causing me to need the intervention of a C-section. I had been warned that might happen. But what if it really WAS my son's big giant head? What if it WAS the fact that I was high risk? Did I bring the C-section on myself? That hurts to think about, but I'm frequently not omniscient. So I can identify with those who made other choices or felt that they had to.

 

I think it could be our own voices judging us, not you guys.

post #90 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post





Well, I'd never met a parent who could stand Elmo, but I knew there must be some...

I don't mind elmo either.  I LOVE Grover and Ernie.  I like Bert, but only because he's Ernie's Best friend.  I wouldn't hang out with him though.
 

 

post #91 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by nextcommercial View Post



I don't mind elmo either.  I LOVE Grover and Ernie.  I like Bert, but only because he's Ernie's Best friend.  I wouldn't hang out with him though.
 

 



I am now always reminded of the Evil Bert site.  Don't think I can link it but a google search will provide. 

 

When I was a kid Grover was my favorite, but for some reason I now associate the name Grover with dirty old men (dude, that pervy guy is such a Grover!).

 

Don't know why...

post #92 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by nextcommercial View Post



I don't mind elmo either.  I LOVE Grover and Ernie.  I like Bert, but only because he's Ernie's Best friend.  I wouldn't hang out with him though.
 

 


I like most of the Sesame Street cast (Big Bird's a bit annoying). But, Elmo's voice grates on me and I'm pretty sure that Elmo's World melts preschool brains into pudding (or maybe that's just mine).

 

post #93 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by meemee View Post

no no mama it is GOOD. human's not dogs. its called nightsoil and is the mainstay in many countries. i am not sure about the processing though.

 

and yes human pee too. v. v. v. good. diluted. just spray on ur veggies. both great fertilizers. 

 

and bone. ground up. bonemeal. not sure if ethics would allow the use of human bonemeal. 

 

and in fact blood too. dont know if you have ever noticed but anywhere a dead animal is buried the next year you see lush vegetation on the mound. 

 

does that mean diva cups should be emptied in the garden? winky.gif

 

 


Hey, if you're already putting humanure, blood and bone in your garden and spraying your vegetables with urine you may as well empty the diva cups there. I don't see how that would be *too bizarre* considering. 

 

post #94 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by alittlesandy View Post

Quote:


I'm so glad I'm not the only one who thought this after reading the op. I'm so tired of failing the AP litmus test.

 

How you know when you won't be invited to the AP self-congratulatory club:

 

Had a c-section...check

Gave my baby a bottle before six weeks, risking (gasp!) nipple confusion, because I HAD to return to work after five weeks...check

Bought and used a crib...check

Bought and used a stroller...check

 

Know what?

I did everything possible to flip my breech baby, including seeing a chiropractor, an acupuncturist, a Chinese-herbalist, and laying upside down on an ironing board for several days.

I worked my A** off to breastfeed for two years, through thrush, mastitis, etc. My baby never had a drop of formula.

I carried my son as much as possible despite a c-section scar that wouldn't heal and severe back pain. I ended up using a stroller half the time.

I put my son to sleep in a crib when he was mobile because I sleep in a loft with an open-railing and I was terrified he would fall out.

 

I know I sound defensive. I AM defensive.

 

I unsubscribed to one of my favorite blogs because the author wrote this long post about how she doesn't want her daughter to play with baby bottles or strollers and never EVER wants her daughter to association a bottle with feeding a baby. WTF? I am the breadwinner of my family and had no choice but to pump and bottle-feed. I proudly associate bottles with my ability to continue breastfeeding my child even after going back to work.

 

I absolutely love and agree with all aspects of AP, but why do there have to be so many unrelenting comparisons? It just makes me sad...

 

People that nurse and work are honestly my hero. I speak from experience because I tried it once and made it till 6 months when my supply dried up and I went to formula. Kudos!
 

 

post #95 of 218

Uh, if you follow the nightsoil path please be aware that people who live in countries in which this agricultural practice is common also RELIGIOUSLY soak their produce in a bleach solution before preparation / consumption to avoid hep and other feces-borne pathogens, as well as to reduce the risk of infant and pediatric diarrhea. Nightsoil can also lead to contamination of the water supply in these places, increasing the risk of infant, pediatric, and geriatric diarrhea, which are serious health risks (and thus cause a need for various methods of sterilizing drinking water, e.g. boiling [expensive use of fuel], and the addition of iodine and chlorine bleach).  

 

I've spent a lot of my life living in places that follow this form of agricultural practice, and while it does increase yields, it is certainly not problem-free. I am sure that with proper precautions these negative results could be avoided.

Quote:
Originally Posted by meemee View Post

no no mama it is GOOD. human's not dogs. its called nightsoil and is the mainstay in many countries. i am not sure about the processing though.

 

and yes human pee too. v. v. v. good. diluted. just spray on ur veggies. both great fertilizers. 

 

and bone. ground up. bonemeal. not sure if ethics would allow the use of human bonemeal. 

 

and in fact blood too. dont know if you have ever noticed but anywhere a dead animal is buried the next year you see lush vegetation on the mound. 

 

does that mean diva cups should be emptied in the garden? winky.gif

 

oh yeah. chicken poop is GREAT too.

 

in my case i dont really get the crunchy comments, but boy oh boy do i get the 'weird' comment a lot (in a good way, not negative). at 8 i am not even sure what would be a 'crunchy' comment...

 

and ... only your child meemee would ask for that. 
 

dd's fav. food - roasted brocolli, cauliflower, kohlrabi and brussel sprouts in the oven drizzled with olive oil and at the end for dd lightly drizzled with maple syrup. 

 

pistachio icecream

 

dd stillllll prefers cosleeping

 

dd walks upto a nursing mom and tells her she just stopped nursing. 



 

post #96 of 218

1. If you're not a debater, you come up with creative and evasive answers when the vaccine topic comes up.  "Oh, my kids have everything they need right now....." whistling.gif

 

2. You can name 5 different uses each for tea tree oil, coconut oil, and distilled white vinegar.

 

3. The power company wants to audit you because they suspect you're tampering with your meter when you're really just line-drying your clothes.

 

4. It occurs to you just how giant your baby's cloth diapered bum looks next to her disposable-diapered peers.

 

5. You're constantly defining "new" words and terms for the moms in your play group, such as "lotus birth," Snappis, and "mei tai."

 

6. You can never get through a doctor visit without the doc lifting a brow and drawling out the words, "Hmmmmm, I seeeeeee...." while cryptically making a note in your chart. 

post #97 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by NellieKatz View Post

 

I think it could be our own voices judging us, not you guys.



clap.gifWe've all felt that feeling of defensiveness for somehow not measuring up to some "standard" as a parent.  There are both "crunchy" and "mainstream" parents who are guilty of creating, perpetuating, and claiming to live up to some Ideal of parenting.  That was not, however, the intent of this thread. 

 

For a light-hearted look at moral snobbery in "crunchy" parenting, I recommend the movie, Away We Go with Maya Rudolph and John Krasinksi.  Hilarity ensues when the couple visits a "crunchy" family in Wisconsin.....

post #98 of 218

Okay, I'll play, even though I also posted in the cancel-out-crunchy-MDCness thread:

 

The other day, DD saw a bug on the sidewalk and said:  "Oh sweetie, are you looking for your mama?"

post #99 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by matte View Post

Uh, if you follow the nightsoil path please be aware that people who live in countries in which this agricultural practice is common also RELIGIOUSLY soak their produce in a bleach solution before preparation / consumption to avoid hep and other feces-borne pathogens, as well as to reduce the risk of infant and pediatric diarrhea. Nightsoil can also lead to contamination of the water supply in these places, increasing the risk of infant, pediatric, and geriatric diarrhea, which are serious health risks (and thus cause a need for various methods of sterilizing drinking water, e.g. boiling [expensive use of fuel], and the addition of iodine and chlorine bleach).  

 

I've spent a lot of my life living in places that follow this form of agricultural practice, and while it does increase yields, it is certainly not problem-free. I am sure that with proper precautions these negative results could be avoided.



 


bow.gif 

 

 

 

 

FTR there are things done in "many countries" that I would never partake in. 

 

post #100 of 218
There are always going to be things in this life that we can't control or don't know if we made good choices or regret, etc., etc., etc. Whether it's how we birthed (I've had both the unnecessary c/s because I wasn't brave enough to kick the OB out and stay home, as well as 3 home births), or how we feed our children, or what we look like or how we eat or how much we exercise or what toys we buy or how much we spend (or don't) or whatever. There is NO perfection. None of us has it, and we ALL have area we struggle with on very real levels.

I hope that we can all have grace to allow ourselves AND others to be proud of things we're proud of even if we, ourselves, can't take that same pride. Surely, though, we have other things we CAN take pride in.

Being an attached parent isn't about whether you got to do everything you would've done in an ideal world. It's about being connected to your child and meeting his or her needs in the best ways you possibly can. It's NOT about following a rule-book. It's NOT about scoring 100 on the Crunchy Quiz. It's about loving your children and doing the best you can. And well fail, and we all make mistakes, and for every cute quip we've got about something our child said or something funny someone said about our hippie ways, the reality is we all have things we're NOT telling. (I'm pretty sure there's already a spinoff thread for that, though! lol.gif)

Anyway, I encourage everyone to be gracious and generous towards each other - including ourselves! Have a laugh, take what works for you, and leave the rest. thumb.gif
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