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When you have no money for groceries, what to do? - Page 2

post #21 of 36

Lot's of good advice.

 

 

I would ask why did you move in the first place? Are you going to be able to move back to the old house I mean and will it get better if you do go back?

 

 

 

If it wont get better or will get worse moving back then you will want to dig in deeper where you are. Have you started a garden or have any livestock? Cheap seeds and cheap chickens can be found and you might be able to trade or barter for them.

 

 

 

Any food banks around? If nothing else and people really are going to literally starve then call your mom and/or anyone else that could possibly lend money or food.

 

 

 

Good luck!

post #22 of 36

IDK how old your kids are but you've received some good advice on here.

Summer jobs for everyone.  Your DH could tutor kids, list himself on craigslist. You should be looking for a job opposite shifts of DH. (I know you have 5 kids but you need money and you need it now).  The kids needs to lose the entitlement attitude and those who are old enough to find a job... look for a job and those who are not of legal working age need to find other ways to make $$.  babysitting, yard work, chores for others etc.

 

You need income and you need it now.

post #23 of 36

 

Quote:

When one of the parents isn't working, I think it IS wrong to expect the kids to help contribute to the family income.

 

Unless the parent is looking for work.

post #24 of 36

What 24 hour places do you have within driving distance? I've been working overnights at Walmart to save for midwifery school. I know moms who work evenings and weekends at grocery stores, etc.

post #25 of 36

I remember working in the fields as a teen.Super hard work,but you could all get in a few hours a day for money or food.

 

When I donated at the salvation army they always had feed breads and other food stuff.

 

In a pinch I have used my credit card for food and then paid that off so no interest.

 

Hope things work out soon. In desperate moments some ramen soup with canned veggies will fill the tummy.Grow some zukes this summer.You can make a lot of dishes and boy are those plants good producers.

post #26 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bokonon View Post




When one of the parents isn't working, I think it IS wrong to expect the kids to help contribute to the family income.

 


Isn't she a stay at home mother of five? That's working.

 

post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyka View Post




Isn't she a stay at home mother of five? That's working.

 



Yes, of course.  But she said that she's been looking for a job and unable to find one.  So how easy would it be for a couple of teenagers to find a job in this job market?

post #28 of 36

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bokonon View Post


Yes, of course.  But she said that she's been looking for a job and unable to find one.  So how easy would it be for a couple of teenagers to find a job in this job market?


It may actually be easier for the teens. Employers like ice cream stands, grocery stores, gym childcares, the YMCA tend to lean more towards hiring teens.
 

 

post #29 of 36

It's going to be very difficult for her teens to find work, particularly farm work-- they will be competing with undocumented laborers, and for other jobs they will be competing with unemployed, experienced adults like their mom.  I agree that at a low income, a 7 person family should have very little tax liability.  Can any deductions be adjusted?  And do stop contributing to retirement (if you are) until things even out.  To the person who asked why she moved, I actually remember her story-- she expected the income from her private daycare but was not able to find clients in the country.

 

I assume you have slashed all unnecessary expenses-- I won't list them all here but basically anything not needed for hygiene, health or survival.  Is there anything in the house you can scrounge together?  Do you know of any food pantries in your area?  Would your kids be too embarrassed to go to a soup kitchen?  (I know these things might be scarce in the country.)  Do you have any friends nearby who can give you some extra stuff from their kitchen, whom you're comfortable asking?  Your kids should qualify for free lunch, no?  Do they have a free breakfast at school?  If so make sure they load up as much as they can.  And I assume you are already budget shopping, buying cheap stuff... rice, dried beans, eggs, pasta.  As awful as it may be you might have to ask for money from your mom, or instead of money, just for groceries.  {{hugs}}

post #30 of 36

* Any areas to glean?

* Dumpster dive?

* Anything you could barter or swap?

* Check Freecycle

* Some local schools here offer free lunch in the summer for kids

* Gardening

post #31 of 36

Around here it is easier for teens to get jobs.  My stupid job loves kids because they pay them less than adults, and they don't ask for full time or benefits.   And its almost a rite of passage around here to detassle corn.   despite a heavy immigrant population most farms hire middle class teens.  go figure.

 

Also if mom  is looking for a job do not discount overnight work.  Since minors can't do this there are usually openings and the pay is better than days.  I didn't find it hard to adjust ot even that hard to go back and forth.  it sucked but it paid the bills and I didn't need childcare. (dh was home overnight and during the mornings)

post #32 of 36

If that was my family's gross income, there is no way I'd be paying for internet access. Are you paying for that? Hope not. If so, cancel it! We almost cancelled ours just because it's a "luxury."

 

Also, cell phones. There's probably only need for one "real" cell phone with a contract per family, in my opinion, if that (this is assuming there are no land lines). Maybe just have one of those ones that is like a prepaid phone card that you get at Walmart, and keep it ONLY for extreme emergencies, like if you are stranded somewhere. Then you can have one phone everyone shares, like if your husband needs a real cell phone with a contract, you can share that with him at night. Would that work? I have considered doing that too, just to save $$$. Hope I'm makin' sense.

 

The other thing, if you decide to keep the internet or if you are using it via a library, is find a couponing blog in your area. A lot of times, they will tell you what you can get for FREE by using coupons or at the least, they will tell you the "after coupons" price of things for the deals they've scouted. These women put lots of work into this. (like if Lay's potato chips are on sale for 1.50 at Albertsons, and the Sunday paper has a 1.00 off coupon, you will only pay 50 cents, and the blog will tell you that, and tell you how long ago that coupon came out, etc. So start saving the coupons every week. Or you can print them). You can probably find coupons in recycling bins, or asking neighbors if they have any extra coupons, or asking gas stations if they have leftover Sunday papers, etc. We get our Sunday paper for like $5/month...something really cheap like that.

 

One site to check out is "the Krazy Coupon Lady." Can't post web addresses here, but google it. Click on the tab that is yellow and says "find my store" in cursive and find the name of your local grocer and click that. You'll find the list of what they call "coupon matchups" for the week. At first, it looks complicated, but after spending one or two nights learning the lingo, you will realize it's easy. SS and RP are SmartSource and RedPlum, the two coupon inserts in the Sunday paper. Another good site is called "Money Saving Mom." She has some recipes, etc and the same couponing info as the other site, and you can click "regional stores" under the "Store Deals" tab, same as the other site, to find your local deals.

 

So my point in the above paragraph is that if you aren't using extreme couponing tactics and checking blogs, you are probably paying too much for food. I never pay retail now.

 

Then there's just cooking really cheaply. There is this book out on Amazon.com and you can click "Look inside the book" (this feature is right above the picture on amazon), and basically read the entire table of contents, and a few pages from the book's intro, etc. The book is called "Family Feasts for $75 a week." I didn't buy the book, because I can't afford it, but I read all those "free pages" on Amazon, plus the reviews down below, and it gave me some ideas of cheap meals. Even what I read in the intro and "look inside this book" gave me some ideas.

 

Good luck!


Edited by bobcat - 6/23/11 at 3:01am
post #33 of 36

Sorry, I think I meant "net" income, not gross income. You get the idea though.

post #34 of 36

hug2.gif mama.  I can relate.

post #35 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyka View Post

Around here it is easier for teens to get jobs.  My stupid job loves kids because they pay them less than adults, and they don't ask for full time or benefits.   And its almost a rite of passage around here to detassle corn.   despite a heavy immigrant population most farms hire middle class teens.  go figure.

 

Also if mom  is looking for a job do not discount overnight work.  Since minors can't do this there are usually openings and the pay is better than days.  I didn't find it hard to adjust ot even that hard to go back and forth.  it sucked but it paid the bills and I didn't need childcare. (dh was home overnight and during the mornings)


Just have to say that I grew up in Brookings and detassled corn as a teen 2 years in a row. It was definitely a teen thing to do.

 

As for the OP, it looks like you have received some good advice. Good Luck!
 

 

post #36 of 36

How are you doing this week, OP?

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