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Rotavirus Vaccine Linked to Bowel Disorder

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

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Edited by member234098 - 6/3/12 at 2:44pm
post #2 of 12

The risk of intussusception  are the same, but the risk of dying from the effects of the rotavirus are still mitigated by taking the vaccine. If you read on further in the article you linked it says:

 

"According to health surveillance data from Mexico and Brazil, about 80,000 hospitalizations and 1,300 deaths are prevented in the two countries every year by vaccinating babies against rotavirus. If the rotavirus vaccine-associated risk in the United States is the same as in Latin America, Parashar says vaccination is probably responsible for 50 to 60 cases of intussusception each year nationwide, while preventing 40,000 to 50,000 rotavirus-related hospitalizations. 

 

Rotavirus is responsible for more than 500,000 deaths each year, primarily in underdeveloped countries, but it is also a significant cause of childhood illness in more affluent nations.

Before the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine, as many as 70,000 rotavirus hospitalizations and about 60 deaths were reported in the U.S. each year.""""""

 

 

post #3 of 12

I think my son had rotavirus when he was 3. It Sucked!!!!!! But, as you said, "I'll take the chances with the disease"....especially if the vaccine can cause the same problems. Only, with the vaccine, you get added ingredients that might cause problems later. Bonus!

 

 

post #4 of 12


 

Quote:

Originally Posted by miriam View Post

 

 

So what are the benefits?  The risks of the disease are the same as the vaccine.



I think you're misreading here, miriam.  The article doesn't say that the odds of any complication (whether intussusception or otherwise) are the same with the vaccine as with the disease.  And as heathergirl pointed out, the article clearly states that many lives have been saved by the vaccine.  I think of that as a benefit, but of course you are welcome to your own opinion. 

post #5 of 12

Rotavirus can be easily managed if treated properly and adequately.    The most important factor with rotavirus is dehydration and treatment is to replace the lost fluids.  Death is caused when it's not managed properly.  I've read somewhere that just about every child under the age of 5 will have contracted rotavirus at least once.

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 


Edited by member234098 - 6/3/12 at 2:43pm
post #7 of 12



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by miriam View Post  

 

Thanks. Glad to know it. I think a benefit is living a life free of chronic diseases and doctor appointments. We clearly disagree on what the  benefit of a vaccine is. 



Just because you repeat something ad nauseum doesn't make it true. I know you'd like it to be true, but there's no evidence that vaccinations in general, or MMR specifically, cause chronic diseases.

 

 

Quote:

As for saving 500,000 lives, show me the proof. 70,000 hospitalizations? Really? As a primary cause? I live in a county with 3 million + people, and I have never seen stats on rotavirus hospitalizations going back 40 years. Supposedly the flu kills 60,000 people a season. Looks like a numbers game to me. How about Vegas odds? 

 

No. You're the one claiming that it's a lie. You prove it. Which brings me to my next point...

 

 

Quote:

If course the article supports the vaccine. Paul Offit is invoked in the article. It is a medical website. 

 

If you think that this article is BS then why did you offer it as basis of proof for your (albeit misguided) reasoning? This is all about an article that YOU brought up in the OP.

 

post #8 of 12

Things are getting pretty personal in this thread.  Please keep things respectful and do not throw accusations at each other.  It does nothing to forward the discusion.

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeckyBird View Post

I think my son had rotavirus when he was 3. It Sucked!!!!!! But, as you said, "I'll take the chances with the disease"....especially if the vaccine can cause the same problems. Only, with the vaccine, you get added ingredients that might cause problems later. Bonus!

 

 


My DD had rotavirus when she was 1.5.  Sure it really sucked for 24 hours, and was mildly annoying for about a week after while her GI tract went back to normal, but afterwards I really couldn't understand why it was top of the list for someone to develop a vaccine for?  In 3rd world countries where kids get dehydrated easily and may not have access to clean drinking water I understand, but in the US where we have popsicles and pedialyte and coconut water in little tetra packs?  (And breastmilk but I know not all mamas breastfeed, sadly...)  I wish all VPDs were that easy to get through...I have fear of many VPDs as an unvaccinating parent but rotavirus, no.  I do not understand why that vaccine exists when there are clear risks of getting the vax that are way worse than getting the disease it is intended to prevent.

post #10 of 12

My ds had rotavirus when he was almost 2. It REALLY sucked. I missed almost 2 weeks of class (my ex refused to help out during the day because he had to "work" and me missing class wasn't as important as him "working"), and did 9 loads of puke covered laundry, and more baths for explosive poop than I care to think about. It was HORRIBLE. I wouldn't wish that on anyone.

post #11 of 12
See this is why there will never a a "one size fits all" answer to vaccines. What was just a annoyance to me was a much bigger deal to SSM. If I was in fact a single mama I can see how it would have been a much worse experience, as DH and I took shifts walking with DD that first night when the vomiting was present, taking turns getting puked on. Even back when I was considering vaccines for DD when she turned 2, (now are delaying further) I still would have never had rotavirus on my list, as *to me* the small but super scary risk of intussception from the vax overshadowed the actual symptoms of rotavirus. If I was a single mama or one who had a job where I was unable to stay home with a sick child, I might feel differently.

This points out to me the greater need for vaccine choice. Instead of sticking to a set schedule, doctors (like Sears) really need to take the time to explain the risks and benefits of each vax to parents and let them decide what is right for their comfort level.

PS, SSM, I assumed from your very pro vax signature and comments on other threads that you vax fully and on schedule. Was your DS already vaxxed for rotavirus when he caught it? I always thought the rota was pretty effective, and by 2 shouldn't he have been fully covered from the vax?
post #12 of 12
He should have been, but we all know vaccines aren't 100%, and rota went through his daycare - I think all but 1 kid got it (there were only 5-6kids though, it was very small).

Rota remains the ONLY time I have ever called my ex and said, "your turn to get puked on. Come get him and bring him back tomorrow"

I would take Rota over the febrile seizures ds got at 19mo while my ex was taking the bar (I had to call exs dads office, and get him pulled out of a wake, so that I could get the message to ex), but it was absolutely awful.
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