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Negative Blood Type

post #1 of 47
Thread Starter 

I was just told by my midwife that I have a type o negative bloodtype. She said that they will have to give me a shot of Rhogam at 28 weeks in case the baby has a positive bloodtype. She said that it probably won't effect this pregnancy, but it could have "dangerous" effects on future pregnancies. I'm really bothered by this because I don't like the idea of getting an injection. Have any of you experienced this? Are there any alternatives?

post #2 of 47

First, do you know/can you find out the baby's father's blood type?  If he's negative, you're golden.  Two negative parents cannot create a positive baby.

 

If he is positive, you can wait until the baby's born and find out his/her blood type.  If it's negative, again, you're golden.  Some people are uncomfortable with this, though, because of the small chance of the baby's blood mixing with yours during the pregnancy or during the birth and causing problems. 

 

I'm sure smarter people will chime in soon, but my first suggestion would be to find out the dad's blood type and go from there.  HTH!

 

ETA:  Oops, just noticed I crashed your DDC, sorry!

post #3 of 47
Thread Starter 

Yep, that's what I'm planning on doing (get daddy's blood type). The thing that...ahem...pisses me off about the situation is that I had to do the research to find out that we could get his blood tested and be golden if he's negative. The midwife made it as though there were no other options. She obviously doesn't respect my wishes to go au natural. Looks like I may have to go midwife shopping! Grrrr!!!

post #4 of 47

That stinks about your midwife. I'm O neg, too, and had the shot w/ my first. Turns out it was a good thing for us as DS is B+ (meaning DH is, too). DH hates needles worse than I do, so he did not want to be tested :( I hope you get your answer soon!

post #5 of 47
Thread Starter 

UPDATE: I asked the midwife about screening the father to see what kind of bloodtype he has, and if it's negative whether it would be harmful for the baby. She said that no, if we're both negative, we have nothing to worry about. I said, "Oh good, so then I won't have to get the shot," and she replied, "Well you still have to get the shot...that's our protocol." Grrrrr!!!! So basically even if they know that nothing bad could happen, they still want to pump me with Rhogam because it's "protocol" and I don't have the choice to refuse it. I mean, perhaps it's better to be safe than sorry, and maybe there still is a risk for the baby if we're both negative, but doesn't this sound like hospital-talk rather than midwife-talk?

post #6 of 47

Thing is, DH of BF is not always the same as bio father. People cheat. Some stat indicate that as much as 10% of kids have different bio fathers than mom indicate on the offical birth certificate. Since stakes are rather high, is is safer to cover everyone than deal with implications of having a positive bio dad while mom is indicating someone elce is a father.

 

In  some hospitals docotr will not disloce baby blood type  to dad wihthout talking to mom first to protect privacy

post #7 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alenushka View Post

Thing is, DH of BF is not always the same as bio father. People cheat. Some stat indicate that as much as 10% of kids have different bio fathers than mom indicate on the offical birth certificate. Since stakes are rather high, is is safer to cover everyone than deal with implications of having a positive bio dad while mom is indicating someone elce is a father.

 

In  some hospitals docotr will not disloce baby blood type  to dad wihthout talking to mom first to protect privacy


Yeah that's why to  some of them it's protocol. They don't want to chance it if the Mom is lying about the paternity.

 

If your DH is a negative blood type then you have nothing to worry about. I'd type the whole explanation about the need for Rhogam if he wasn't but I am lazy. lol

 

post #8 of 47
post #9 of 47

I am O- and as much as I like to keep things as natural as possible I have heard the horror stories about people who didn't get it and the affects on future pregnancies.  My husband is positive so it is one shot I have decided to be grateful for!  This is my fourth pregnancy.

post #10 of 47

Even if the father is positive, the 28 week Rhogam shot has a lot of negatives and no real positives. The safest option is to wait to find out the baby's type after birth and get the shot within 72 hours if the baby is positive. The only reason to get it during pregnancy is if you have something happen that increases your risk of sensitization eg. amnio, severe abdominal injury,  etc. There is such a thing a silent sensitization, which means there's no obvious trauma to cause it, but it's rare and you would still have to have the shot within 72 hours of whatever that event was and really, what are the odds it's going to have happened within 72 hours of 28 weeks?

 

This is a great thread about Rhogam http://www.mothering.com/community/forum/thread/455838/rhogam

post #11 of 47

Well, odd are not as low as you think once you think about it. And odds are 100 when it happens to you

post #12 of 47

I had it with my first pregnancy at around 13 weeks because of some bleeding and had to continue getting the shot throughout my pregnancy. I had no problems with it.

post #13 of 47

That is just not true.


The benefits  you will not develop antibodies threatening the life of your next baby. Babies used to die or were stillborn due to RH disease.

Yes, there risks but they  blwon out of proportion.

 

Why not google real   sceintific websited with real data?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Devaskyla View Post

Even if the father is positive, the 28 week Rhogam shot has a lot of negatives and no real positives. The safest option is to wait to find out the baby's type after birth and get the shot within 72 hours if the baby is positive. The only reason to get it during pregnancy is if you have something happen that increases your risk of sensitization eg. amnio, severe abdominal injury,  etc. There is such a thing a silent sensitization, which means there's no obvious trauma to cause it, but it's rare and you would still have to have the shot within 72 hours of whatever that event was and really, what are the odds it's going to have happened within 72 hours of 28 weeks?

 

This is a great thread about Rhogam http://www.mothering.com/community/forum/thread/455838/rhogam



 

post #14 of 47

Thanks, but my info is from real, scientific websites, including the manufacturer. Getting the shot during pregnancy reduces the chance of sensitization by, at most, 1%. Rhogam is a class C drug. IMO, 1% is NOT worth the risk when no one knows the long term effects, especially on RH + girls and their future childbearing. The antibodies in Rhogam can & have crossed the placenta & killed red blood cells in RH + fetuses. And Rhogam is a blood product. It should be reserved for when it's needed, not given routinely. It is only given after birth, unless there is a situation where there is a strong possibility of being sensitized, in most other other countries.

 

Did you even read the link to the thread I posted? There were several women who posted who were sensitized, including at least one who had the shot multiple times.

post #15 of 47

I would absolutely get the shot if you know your partner is positive.  My DH is pos, I'm negative and I get the shots.  No questions. I remember learning about the importance of Rhogam in an intro to physical anthro calls in college.  I truly can't imagine risking your future fertility.  It really is that simple.

 

I'll be getting at least two shots during this pregnancy. 

post #16 of 47

DDCC- I am A- and have gotten the Rhogam shot with my previous two pregnancies at 28 weeks and within 72 hours after b/c both my kids are Rh+.   Since you would prefer to avoid the shot, definitely type your dh as you could have nothing to worry about, though statistically it's not very likely that he is also negative.   If it's difficult to get it covered by insurance you can purchase an Eldon Card on Amazon and type him yourself at home-  it's very easy and not expensive.

 

As several pp's have said I do believe that it's pretty safe to decline the 28 week shot and just get the second one if baby is Rh+ (and the chances are pretty good since the negative allele is not very common).   I remember reading up on this a while back and recall reading that the sensitization rate with exposure is about 17%.  So first, you have to be exposed and then you also have to fall into that minority that gets sensitized.  BUT, if you do it's permanent and then it could affect future pregnancies.  So to me a good compromise is declining the 28 week (and I am surprised that they don't allow this- is your mw just pushy or will you have to leave the practice?) and getting the postpartum one if necessary.   It's a stinging shot like tetanus (though not quite as bad) so I recommend getting it in your arm to avoid stiffness.

 

Good luck with your decision!


Edited by Jaimee - 6/24/11 at 2:07pm
post #17 of 47

Yes, it is a blood product, but donors go through rigorous screening, much more so that usual donors. It is also a plasma donation, not a donation of whole blood. If you wouldn't refuse a blood transfusion because of possible risks, then don't discount the safety of their donor screening.

 

Now, I agree that the 28 weeks shot is mostly prophylaxis, unless their has been an indication that you needed a Rhogam shot. If I was say, getting an amnio or CVS test I would request a Rhogam shot. Now, the theory of why they give the Rhogam at 28 weeks is because the shot lasts about 12 weeks, and since the third trimester is where you are statistically more likely to become sensitized, it may or may not be useful to receive the shot at that point.

 

The issue is becoming sensitized. Since IgGs (immunoglobulins that are part of your immune system's second response) can cross the placenta, that is of concern to me. Since I have seen first hand the agglutination of red blood cells when incompatible types are mixed, it makes me a tad more wary.

 

I am willing to subject myself to the very slight risks of a Rhogam shot to prevent myself from becoming sensitized. Since newborn hemolytic disease is so serious I am not willing to risk that by refusing this one shot.

post #18 of 47
I am rh negative, and have had both shots of winrho (Canadian version of rhogam) at 28 weeks and after birth, omitting my one rh-neg child.

We went through the experience of having a positive Coombs test after the birth of our fourth child notwithstanding our preventative efforts. What followed was sheer terror for us, and agony for our newborn, as she had to endure excriciating blood draws. I am being monitored even more closely this pregnancy with biweekly blood draws and pray we never have to go through this again.

With the greatest of respect to all of the members of this wonderful community, I would urge you to first consult with a hematologist before declining this shot. The science behind this is complex, and even my husband who is a doctor was grateful for the information the hematologist provided. This is not a simple decision to decline something medically unnecessary and it is not a trifling risk. My aunt lost four babies before the rh factor was understood, and I would hate for you or your baby to have to experience what we did, looking at our perfect newborn, knowing her blood might try to kill her.

Please ensure you are FULLY informed before you proceed.

With love and respect, to everyone who posted.
post #19 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaimee View Post

DDCC- I am A- and have gotten the Rhogam shot with my previous two pregnancies at 28 weeks and within 72 hours after b/c both my kids are Rh+.   Since you would prefer to avoid the shot, definitely type your dh as you could have nothing to worry about, though statistically it's not very likely that he is also negative. "

 

Good luck with your decision!



The correct advice is not "DH " but bio father of the child.

post #20 of 47

1% is very risk worthy when you are talking about your child. 1% is significant.

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