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Is ths actually possible? - Page 2

post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by erigeron View Post
 

Thanks for the information, Maggie. That's very good to know. One real frustrating thing about my practice is I don't get to really follow up with patients all that often and see how they do on their medications. I get a lot of theoretical stuff but little in the way of a personal impression based on experience. I'm still a pretty new practitioner, but it's going to take me forever to accumulate any of these experiences because of the way my practice is structured. Blah! I do get breastfeeding patients asking me about hydrocodone sometimes. I'm glad to hear you haven't noticed any problems with it. 

 

On a personal note, my daughter was sleepy and I didn't take anything stronger than ibuprofen. I think for her it was a touch of jaundice causing that, though. 


It's got to be frustrating!  One of my close friends is a pharmacist, but he works in a private pharmacy that specializes in chronic pain patients, compounding and hospice pharmacy work, so he gets a lot of feed back on his job. (It's the pharmacy I always use.) People with these situations tend to stay with the same pharmacy if it fits their needs.

 

When I did a lot of Hot Line work in Lactation I got frustrated because I had little feedback after I would talk to a new mother. Luckily, I was also doing clinical face to face hands on work, so I was seeing clients I could follow up with. In lactation people disappear quickly and don't follow up with you if 1) they quit breastfeeding 2) things go really well and they nearly forgot they saw you. :rotflmao

 

I try to follow up with as many clients as possible, but I can see that in pharmacy work in a lot of cases, there isn't a lot of follow up. Personally, I think it's wise to use the same pharmacy for everything and to have all in the family use the same pharmacy. That way the pharmacist sees you regularly (and treating my migraines has me in my pharmacy a lot) and also the pharmacist gets to know you and your family and can help keep an eye out for side effects and allergies etc in the family.

 

Jaundice, even mild physiologic jaundice is infamous for causing some pretty intense lethargy and sleepiness. The more milk you get into the faster, the more quickly it will resolve. But, yes, jaundice can and usually does cause extreme sleepiness in newborns.

post #22 of 23

It's doubly so in my case because normally I float so I am at a different site each day. So I don't even get the follow-up of seeing the same people when they come back for refills or call back because they have a problem or something. :( 

 

The jaundice kind of knocked us for a loop. She wanted to sleep for hours and hours that first week or so. Nobody told me about sleepy newborns and jaundice so I felt, rightly or wrongly, that I would feed her when she got hungry on her own. The nurses in the hospital kept trying to get me to put wet cloths on her, etc. to get her to wake up and feed. So she would wake up and squirm and fuss, but zonk right back out when the cloth was removed. I'm still not sure if that was the right approach or not.  

post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by erigeron View Post
 

It's doubly so in my case because normally I float so I am at a different site each day. So I don't even get the follow-up of seeing the same people when they come back for refills or call back because they have a problem or something. :( 

 

The jaundice kind of knocked us for a loop. She wanted to sleep for hours and hours that first week or so. Nobody told me about sleepy newborns and jaundice so I felt, rightly or wrongly, that I would feed her when she got hungry on her own. The nurses in the hospital kept trying to get me to put wet cloths on her, etc. to get her to wake up and feed. So she would wake up and squirm and fuss, but zonk right back out when the cloth was removed. I'm still not sure if that was the right approach or not.  


Oh, they float you? Yeah, not much time for follow up with different sites every day. My clients have my number if I'm only doing a Consult, and if I'm also her doula it's great because I can help guide her through the early days of breastfeeding and be there when she needs me. I like doing a Consult followed by a few days of doula work so I can easily follow up. It's harder for me to follow up weigh ins with my clients in Chicago, because I see clients there, but something simple like a weigh in is difficult because it's often a 2-3 hour round trip. Luckily, the agency I work for has a Clinic where the babies can be weighed in and I can get the results.

 

I think with things like what you and your baby went through, you have to go on your own instinct., I did use "The Washcloth" with my youngest baby. She was a premie and lost more than 10% of her body weight and although she didn't have jaundice, she was sleepy when she got on the breast the first few days. I would just keep a damp washcloth on the bar of the hospital bed and "threaten" her with it if she fell asleep on the breast. :rotflmao"Sage, baby, do you want Mama to get The Washcloth? Wake up and drink your milk, honey!" I swear by the third day all I had to do was say "Washcloth" and Sage's eyes would pop open and she'd start nursing again. But, I'm a big believer in Mama Instinct! If yours said to let her sleep and she would let you know when she needed milk, and she was well hydrated and doing well otherwise then that was the way to go in that situation. 

 

I think a lot of the time in the hospital, nurses don't want babies to end up under the lights (that happens when the bilirubin reaches a certain level, depending on the hospital's specific protocol.)  The lights suck!   Some babies just don't stay awake, Washcloth or not. No reason to chill the baby if the method isn't working. But, so many Mamas have such good instincts that they just know what will work for their babies!

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