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so what about teaching "the real world" in unschooling - Page 2

post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dar View Post



As for the rest - most homeschoolers spend a lot of time in the "real world" - and I don't see school as a good representation of the real world, really.
 


THIS! What school represents is NOT what I want for my children. I do NOT want them to sit at a desk working a 9-5 job 5 days a week. I want them to explore and follow their passions and live life to the fullest. My children do not need to learn that sometimes you have to do boring stuff - they learn that mom doesn't mind doing housework because it blesses her family and she ENJOYS taking care of her family. They learn that waiting in line happens because others need the bank/ grocery store too and that they barely notice it because we are chatting. I can not think of a single "boring" thing I HAVE to do.

 

post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by miriam View Post

‎"If everyone is constantly learning, and each child's life is his education, why the need for formal education? " - Murray Rothbard,  http://mises.org/daily/222​6

 

This is taken out of context and doesn't mean what it appears to mean here in this thread.

 

From the same article:

 

 

Quote:

"But there is one area of education where direct spontaneity and a few precepts will not suffice. This is the area of formal study, specifically the area of intellectual knowledge. That knowledge beyond the direct area of his daily life involves a far greater exercise of reasoning powers. This knowledge must be imparted by the use of observation and deductive reasoning, and such a body of thought takes a good deal of time to learn. Furthermore, it must be learned systematically, since reasoning proceeds in orderly, logical steps, organizing observation into a body of systematic knowledge.

 

"The child, lacking the observations and the developed reasoning powers, will never learn these subjects by himself alone, as he can other things. He could not observe and deduce them by his own unaided mental powers. He may learn them from the oral explanations of an instructor, or from the written testimony of books, or from a combination of both. The advantage of the book is that it can set forth the subject fully and systematically; the advantage of the teacher is that, in addition to previous knowledge from the book, he knows and deals with the child directly, and can explain the salient or unclear points. Generally, it has been found that a combination of book and teacher is best for formal instruction."

 

 

post #23 of 29

Alfie Kohn has a great book, What Does it Mean to be Well Educated, which addresses the idea that knowledge and formal learning come from people determining that there is a set way that children should and must learn. Children are born learners, observers who can reason, make decisions, reflect and obtain knowledge. Teachers standing at the front of the room lecturing, is one way kids learn but it isn't the way the have to learn. If the idea that children only learn in school lessons that they need to know, then we might as well take them from birth from their parents and put them in school- this way, we ensure they will learn everything they need to learn. Honestly, that is a rather absurd idea, but I have seen it toted before.

 Alfie also talks about the idea of having to do boring stuff to learn to do boring stuff (of insert test taking, or homework). He really nails some of the ridiculous assumptions that are made about education and learning.

 

In our house, the everyday stuff is what keeps life humming- it is necessary, it is part of life and yes, sometimes it isn't fun. I don't find washing the toilet fun, but yes, it needs to get done. Life lessons are learned whether we homeschool or not, since we are a family and as a family, we have obligations to each other, the planet and our neighbors.

post #24 of 29

My husband had the same concern-- how will they learn that life isn't perfect and you don't always get what you want?  That you have to wait and be patient?  Blah, blah, blah.  I had to laugh pretty hard at that one.  I said, look.  We have FOUR KIDS.  Not a ton of $.  Do you seriously think they do not get disappointed?  They are disappointed routinely!  They have to wait all the time! 

 

Trust me, I would love to create that kind of life for them, but it isn't possible.  If I had the chance to create an life for them where they would be fulfilled and get their needs taken care of ASAP?  I would do it in a heatbeat!  Why are people so against this for children anyway? 

post #25 of 29

Just to say that I think the "real world" is also quite a shock for kids leaving school, too.  The ones bound for "success" will adjust and be content.  Whether they use the social and academic skills learned in school is a matter of debate, and probably different for each student.  Same with unschoolers. We are just beginning, but I have a feeling that the "real world" will be less of a shock to my kids when they are let loose.  As to how to relate to school kids?  Well, that's just like visiting another region.  I moved in the 5th grade (the middle of) from Spokane to Las Vegas.  Wow! Completely different kids!  It took a lot of adjustment that I was "unprepared" for.  The fact is, nothing can prepare you completely for every encounter.  Thank goodness!  Nothing teaches open mindedness like being slapped in the face with a culture that is completely different from what you grew up with.  You can cower, or you can accept.

post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetSilver View Post

We are just beginning, but I have a feeling that the "real world" will be less of a shock to my kids when they are let loose.  As to how to relate to school kids?  Well, that's just like visiting another region.

The "real world" hasn't been a shock to my daughter at all, because she was never "let loose"... she was never held back, and she has been gradually becoming more and more independent, so there really isn't a big shift. Stuff like doing her own laundry and cleaning, handling college classes, working, handling her own bank account, cooking, using public transportation..... at 18 she started handling her own doctor and dentist appointments, because that was when she was legally able to, but nothing else really changed.

And relating to school kids? It's not like there's ever been a period in her life when she wasn't doing this, so for her it was just normal. Some kids go to school and some don't, and she's always had friends and interactions with both groups. Sure, some of their experiences have been different from hers, but everyone's experiences are different - some of her friends had siblings, or dads, or went to church every Sunday, or whatever, and there's never been a need to "adjust".

Maybe the issue is more about how much parents choose to keep their kids separated from the people and responsibilities of the real world. I don't think that's an unschooling thing, though, but rather a parenting choice.
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lillian J View Post

My grown son has said that he had an idyllic childhood - but that isn't something that made him sad about the rest of the world at all. It simply gave him the benefit of being able to grow up healthy and happy. 


 

yeahthat.gif

 

 

post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dar View Post



The "real world" hasn't been a shock to my daughter at all, because she was never "let loose"... she was never held back, and she has been gradually becoming more and more independent, so there really isn't a big shift. 

You're right, I just couldn't find the words for leaving the nest....

post #29 of 29
I agree about the relationship with the "real world" being more about parenting style or choice. Some parents shield their kids from anything that could interfere with their children learning accountability in public school! And some kids' reality is significantly rosier than my kids'...but that doesn't make my world more "real" than theirs. It sounds like a classic "I walked 3 miles to school in the snow...barefoot" sort of argument to me!
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