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Should children be allowed to drink diet soda? - Page 2

post #21 of 47
Absolutely not. I won't even consume diet soda and soda is not a drink for children, diet or otherwise, IMHO. If DS (3 yo) asks about soda, he's told that it's just like coffee, beer, and wine...something that mommy and daddy can drink, but it's not for kids. He gets that. He's never had soda of any kind and I'm hoping to keep it that way for a while yet. He drink water and milk (and occasionally apple juice at Sunday School)...that's it. No juice or soda in my house.
post #22 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by midnightwriter View Post

I do allow organic soda with lower sugar content, as a treat. I *might* allow regular soda, to an older child, in some special circumstances. But diet soda???? No, no, no, NO way. Do your SIL and BIL know about artificial sweeterns and aspartame? Many assume that 'diet' anything is by definition healthier and better.


This!

My kids have had sprite from time to time.. VERY irregularly.. but I can't handle diet soda (It gives me horrible headaches), so there's NO way I'd let my kiddos drink it.
 

 

post #23 of 47

My kids' orthodontist has really ground it into their heads that regular drinking of soda, diet or not, is bad for their teeth because of the amount of acid. He shows all his patients photos of kids teeth who drank too much soda. (It's kinda of like those drunk driving videos we all saw in drivers ed). He also gives them lectures explaining that because their parents are paying a lot of money to straighten their teeth, they have a responsibility to take care of them, and part of that is not drinking soda all day every day.

 

He told them if they wanted to have a soda occasionally when doing something special, that was fine. But that it shouldn't be something they were drinking every day or their just wasn't any point in straightening their teeth. 

 

May be you could help your DH brainstorm some other ideas for those situations. If rather than saying "no,"  you say "why don't we try this instead" it might go better.

 

Good luck

 

 

post #24 of 47

I used to drink a lot of diet soda. I regret that now. I know that at the time, I'd notice an odd lightheadedness/spacey feeling after drinking it, yet I refused to believe that aspartame or sucralose could possibly be allowed in our food if it was bad for us. Sigh. When I was 2 months into nursing my dd, I began reading more about it, and stopped.

 

I'll drink some soda with sugar in it once and awhile. Not healthy per se but far better than consuming a sketchy chemical that has not even been in our food system for that long. I love carbonation, so soda water with a bit of real juice is my go to bubbly indulgence.

 

As for my dd, she tried soda water/juice once and cried!

 

"Don't like bubbles!" she said. Fewf. I'm glad about that! Of course I've made it clear to all of the people who might give her "diet" anything that I am not OK with that as it's linked to various negative issues in health and even possible problems with brain development in young children.   

 

Sister in law gave her diet cranberry juice once at a party and I gently traded it for regular apple, saying simply that I don't trust aspartame.

 

In your case OP, I'd try to gently offer some relevant reading to your husband, and just point out that the chemicals are just that, and that real sugar is not ideal, but is less sketchy. Even better, get the soda pop out of the house and try the soda water/juice idea. :-)


Edited by ghannit - 7/18/11 at 9:15pm
post #25 of 47

I think aspartame and the other major artificial sweeteners are safe and healthier than HFCS or sugar, but there are other things in cola I wouldn't want my kids to have. 

post #26 of 47

We just pulled soda out of the house- largely because my oldest was getting totally hooked.  We didn't have diet soda ever, because we prefer regular, and I don't like the chemistry set of diet.  However, we have now relegated soda to an out and about occasional treat, and not something we keep in the house.  I have found a brand of seltzer water that comes in cans, and we have that handy, and the rest of the time options are water, milk, or herbal tea (I steeped mint tea this morning with a little hibiscus in it- very refreshing in this hot weather) 

 

My wake up call- in addition to just plain knowing better- my oldest son age 3- who didn't have soda or anything of the sort- that was only something my oldest child (9) had access to occasionally, started developing signs of type 1 diabetes onset.  His blood sugars are still running a little high, but we're in a wait and see pattern according to our pediatrician because his A1C is perfect.  The whole thing though made me realize that when I married DH I let MY standards slide in terms of healthy eating, and DD lost a lot of her healthy habits.  The boys have grown up only knowing the way their dad eats/lives, and they don't have as healthy a lifestyle as DD and I did before I married DH.  

 

Since we are currently separated as DH has gone ahead to our new home with work and the kids and I are following, I took the opportunity to a. break bad habits now without his influence and b. make it clear that DH is going to keep his bad habits out of the house.  If he wants to eat junk he has to go out for it and not bring it home. When he realized that it really does have an effect on the kids, he agreed.  I can't make him choose the things I do, or that I think are important for the kids for himself, but I do have every right to set boundaries to protect their health. 

 

I am not super protective/healthy, I have no problem with occasional treats, but when those treats become tools and lifestyle patterns there is a big problem.  You DH needs to find better ways to deal with your child without bribing him with unhealthy junk as that is simply setting up lifelong bad habits for your child. 

post #27 of 47
DH and I both don't drink soda, so it's not an issue. If DD were to ever ask, based upon seeing family or friends drink it, I'd just say no, we don't drink that. There's plenty of other things that are like that in our life (like not eating meat) and she already understands that different people eat and drink different things.
I agree with the other posters who have suggested that you and DH switch to a healthier option for yourselves. Win-win situation IMO.
post #28 of 47
Thread Starter 

Great responses, everyone! I especially like the suggestions for alternative drinks that we can have in the house, particularly as DH and I wean off the soda! We have already eliminated the soda from the house since we got back from the vacation. It is a bit of a transition for us, but just the fact that we crave it tells us we have been addicted!

 

I got a GREAT book from the library for anyone interested  -- Little Sugar Addicts: End the Mood Swings, Meltdowns, Tantrums, and Low Self-Esteem in Your Child Today, by Kathleen DesMaisons. She talks about sugar sensitivity, the processes that go on in the brain for people sensitive to sugar (like DH, DS and me), and how to get buy in from your child to eat right. It suggests above all else including more protein in meals and snacks to stave off the up and down swings induced by sugar (and artificial sugar).

 

Now, if I could just get DS back on a decent sleep schedule!!!

post #29 of 47

To me, this is SO a hill to die on.  We don't drink soda (it's culturally not something that is significant in dh's culture and I just don't drink it much) and dd (9) has never had soda pop.  I truly believe that soda pop (even diet because it causes a whole other host of health problems) is the #1 culprit for health issues in America.  It is STRICTLY forbidden in our household for children and rarely ever consumed by adults.  I would have a very stern discussion with anyone who allowed my dd to drink soda.

 

We have cases and cases of sparkling mineral water, though.

post #30 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post

 

We have cases and cases of sparkling mineral water, though.



This is a really great idea.  Where I live, the tap water isn't potable so it is easier to grab a can/bottle etc in so many situations.  I've switched to keeping tons of bottled water, lots of canned sparkling water and so on around. 

 

 

post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by insidevoice View Post

This is a really great idea.  Where I live, the tap water isn't potable so it is easier to grab a can/bottle etc in so many situations.  I've switched to keeping tons of bottled water, lots of canned sparkling water and so on around. 

I'm not sure where you live, but we get S. Pellegrino by the case at Costco for quite a reasonable price.  I can't remember off the top of my head what the exact price is, but we drink about a bottle a day, and it's less than $1.  Certainly much less than people spend on soda pop.  Other than that, we do drink a lot of tap water (we filter it, but it has quite a nice flavor and is, of course, potable).  We keep small bottles of the S. Pellegrino (MUCH more expensive) to take on the go, but mostly we take filtered tap water when we go out.  I can't imagine how difficult it must be to live where the tap water isn't potable. 

post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post

I think aspartame and the other major artificial sweeteners are safe and healthier than HFCS or sugar, but there are other things in cola I wouldn't want my kids to have. 



You may want to do some research on aspartame if you are consuming it, it is one of the most toxic things in our food, and very dangerous for children. I would be happy to send you some links for more information.

 

post #33 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xavismom View Post





You may want to do some research on aspartame if you are consuming it, it is one of the most toxic things in our food, and very dangerous for children. I would be happy to send you some links for more information.

 

I don't eat it because I don't like the taste, but I researched it since I was raised to believe it causes cancer, and came to the realization that it has been tested extensively and is known to be safe.
 

 

post #34 of 47

I'm really not sure where you found information that aspartame is safe, because even the governments own studies on it show it isnt. Its an excitotoxin, which destroys brain cells (similar to MSG). I am really glad you dont drink it though! I agree it tastes awful smile.gif

 

Dr Russell Blaylock is a neurosurgeon who saw first hand the damage excitotoxins did to the human brain, and has done extensive research on it. You can find a lot of his writings and videos pretty easy on the internet. He has also exposed the monetary conflicts of interest the members of the panel that approved it for human consumption had. I think there is a documentary he is in available on NaturalNews.

 

It can be quite confusing at times to try and figure out what the heck IS ok to eat, you know? dizzy.gif

 

 

 

 

post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xavismom View Post

I'm really not sure where you found information that aspartame is safe, because even the governments own studies on it show it isnt. Its an excitotoxin, which destroys brain cells (similar to MSG). I am really glad you dont drink it though! I agree it tastes awful smile.gif

 

Dr Russell Blaylock is a neurosurgeon who saw first hand the damage excitotoxins did to the human brain, and has done extensive research on it. You can find a lot of his writings and videos pretty easy on the internet. He has also exposed the monetary conflicts of interest the members of the panel that approved it for human consumption had. I think there is a documentary he is in available on NaturalNews.

 

It can be quite confusing at times to try and figure out what the heck IS ok to eat, you know? dizzy.gif

 

 

 

 

It's not that confusing if you have a strong background in science. Actually, MSG and aspartame are both safe food additives. There is a strong scientific consensus on this. I can see how you would be confused if you are getting your information from NaturalNews, though. There aren't government studies that show that aspartame destroys brain cells. Glutamate, like aspartate, is an amino acid, which in high levels (caused by disease, not diet) can cause neurological damage. Both glutamate and aspartate are naturally occurring in many foods. HTH!

 


Edited by MJB - 7/20/11 at 11:28am
post #36 of 47

I'd say no. A friend of mine gave her 6 week old on son soda and chocolate milk - broke my heart.

 

We don't keep it in the house and we never will. Water, milk and the occasional fruit/veg juice is all we give him to drink.

post #37 of 47

Definitely no on the diet soda. My daughter has tried regular soda here and there, but she doesnt really like it. We do drink club soda with a little fruit juice in it, and she likes that. Its about 1 part juice to 3 or 4 parts club soda. In comparison regular soda is way sweeter and I dont think she likes it.

 

Aspartame gives me horrible migraines.

 

There are plenty of studies out there that link artificial sweeteners to negative health affects.

post #38 of 47

Our family doesn't do soda. I don't ban it outright, we just have no use for it. DS drinks water, a few plant-based milks, and smoothies. I'd rather see a kid drinking regular soda than diet soda though. I'd take the sugar over the additives any day. That being said, I hate seeing very young children, (and sometimes babies!), drinking soda. You have a small window of opportunity to shape a child's nutritional habits and well-being, why bring soda and empty calories into the mix that soon?

post #39 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post



It's not that confusing if you have a strong background in science. Actually, MSG and aspartame are both safe food additives. There is a strong scientific consensus on this. I can see how you would be confused if you are getting your information from NaturalNews, though. There aren't government studies that show that aspartame destroys brain cells. Glutamate, like aspartate, is an amino acid, which in high levels (caused by disease, not diet) can cause neurological damage. Both glutamate and aspartate are naturally occurring in many foods. HTH!

 



Well no, that does not help actually. You seem to be making a lot of assumptions about me to support your opinion. But I am done with this, because it is certaintly not my job to convince you that aspartame is dangerous, its my job to keep myself and my family safe and healthy.

 

I wish health and happiness to you and your family as well.  

 

post #40 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post



I don't eat it because I don't like the taste, but I researched it since I was raised to believe it causes cancer, and came to the realization that it has been tested extensively and is known to be safe.
 

 


I am very curious what "research" has proven aspartame "safe" as well. The FDA lists 92 side effects and the majority of the food complaints they investigate per year are related to Aspartame.

 

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