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"K" and other REALLY annoying text messages and email non ettiquite. - Page 2

post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy View Post

My 16 yo went through a phase of, instead of "k" for okay, she would text back "potassium", for which k is the chemical symbol.


I like that kid!

post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy View Post

My 16 yo went through a phase of, instead of "k" for okay, she would text back "potassium", for which k is the chemical symbol.


Brilliant!

 

Not really a 'tester', so not much to add other than I think it was nicer when people would call to say hi, chit-chat, and ask specific questions all at once.  And my college experience would have been something else altogether if my friends & I had had cameraphones/texting/even just plain cellphones.  I can just imagine all the wackier things we'd have done with that too.  demon.gif  

post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by mumkimum View Post
And my college experience would have been something else altogether if my friends & I had had cameraphones/texting/even just plain cellphones.  I can just imagine all the wackier things we'd have done with that too.  demon.gif  


So true! I find myself simultaneously so grateful that such technology didn't exist when I was young, and so horrified that it exists during my kids' youth. yikes2.gif

post #24 of 30

... ok, i admit that i hate to capitalize.  however if i am emailing a colleague or something then i will take the extra time to hit that shift key... sorry, everybody else.

and yet i fully expect everyone to use apostrophes and commas correctly.  and by correctly i mean oxford comma please.  and yet, i really enjoy lolspeak much more than a mature mama should.  ;)

 

that being said, there is a time and place for abbreviated text.  if you are a teenager and your fellow teenagers enjoy, understand, and appreciate abbreviated text message language, then by all means go4it (haha).  but it absolutely blows my mind that college students think it perfectly appropriate to email me messages that i don't always quite understand.  in the context of their texts i am either: their instructor for a college course or a librarian from whom they are (supposedly) requesting information.  i should not have to look in google to figure out wth your acronym means if you are trying to communicate with me within an educational setting. 

....end rant..........

 

post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by hildare View Post

... ok, i admit that i hate to capitalize.  however if i am emailing a colleague or something then i will take the extra time to hit that shift key... sorry, everybody else.

and yet i fully expect everyone to use apostrophes and commas correctly.  and by correctly i mean oxford comma please.  and yet, i really enjoy lolspeak much more than a mature mama should.  ;)

 

that being said, there is a time and place for abbreviated text.  if you are a teenager and your fellow teenagers enjoy, understand, and appreciate abbreviated text message language, then by all means go4it (haha).  but it absolutely blows my mind that college students think it perfectly appropriate to email me messages that i don't always quite understand.  in the context of their texts i am either: their instructor for a college course or a librarian from whom they are (supposedly) requesting information.  i should not have to look in google to figure out wth your acronym means if you are trying to communicate with me within an educational setting. 

....end rant..........

 


YES! I can't stand when apostrophes are in the wrong spot. I don't mind if people leave them out completely in an informal email or text, but if you are going to use them at all, use them correctly!  My grocery store has a huge sign that says "ATM's Available." Really? Someone named ATM is available to see the public? 

 

post #26 of 30

Texting is an eye-opener.  I have lost a lot of respect for people based on the fact that they are horrible writers.

 

The lesson is that people should not text snobs.

 

However, I like texting.  I don't like talking with most folks on the phone because, well, they're boring.  So, texting offers me the opportunity to get the information I need without having to endure their conversation.  This, to me, is good use of technology. 

 

I don't like chatspeak and I tell folks that.  If they decide to keep using it, I tell them to stop texting me.  It works. 

post #27 of 30
Thread Starter 
Another thing I have realized that three seperate people I know do:


Use the word "yeah" for the exclamation "yea!"

For example:

I sent a pick of our ultrasound to my SIL and she responded "yeah".

I told a friend of mine that my parents we moving here and my stepmom got a job and she responded "yeah"

These people mean yea, not yeah. Because, sending someone an us pic and have a response of "yeah" feels like they are saying "Yeah, what of it?"


Maybe I need to just stop all texting altogether.
post #28 of 30

I would say they meant "yay", not "yea". "Yea" is archaic, as in "yea or nay", or "Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death...". "Yeah" could be accurate though (well, ish); I've seen it used as an exclamation, just like "Yes!" (think Napoleon Dynamite). If your friends had added an exclamation point, I wouldn't have thought their responses were off at all. "An untrasound pic? Yeah!" It kinda works.

post #29 of 30

In my field I right in short form all the time. So I get used to it and have to remember not to use the same shortforms in usual text. For example:  O brought in cat for u/a.  Cysto done - u/a  c&s showed uti. Rx (as per DR) clav 62.5 1 tab po bid x 14d.   Or if I had to fill that all out long hand in the file it would read.  Owner brought cat in for urinalysis.  Urine collected by cystocentesis. urinalysis and Culture and sensitivity showed evidence of urinary tract infection.   Prescription as per doctor: clavamox 62.5mg tablets 1 tablet given orally every 12 hours for 14 days.

So my life is made easier by shortforms.  thumb.gif

post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonegirl View Post

In my field I right in short form all the time. So I get used to it and have to remember not to use the same shortforms in usual text. For example:  O brought in cat for u/a.  Cysto done - u/a  c&s showed uti. Rx (as per DR) clav 62.5 1 tab po bid x 14d.   Or if I had to fill that all out long hand in the file it would read.  Owner brought cat in for urinalysis.  Urine collected by cystocentesis. urinalysis and Culture and sensitivity showed evidence of urinary tract infection.   Prescription as per doctor: clavamox 62.5mg tablets 1 tablet given orally every 12 hours for 14 days.

So my life is made easier by shortforms.  thumb.gif

 

Teehee, my medical transcription training paid off, I could totally read your shorthand before you translated :D
 

 

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