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What do you think about barefoot children, especially toddlers? - Page 2

post #21 of 79

we live in a busy apartment complex, the road between parking lots is at our front door, with a small sidewalk in between. too much stuff on the ground,  so i had to convince my girl to wear shoes early on. she fought it, got a few little cuts and scrapes, then she decided to wear flip-flops. i make sure she plays out back in the big yard with her shoes off sometimes, we wiggle our toes in the grass, feels great and is very grounding. she also has to wear sneakers for bike riding and tree climbing, never argues with me about that. we're both barefoot hillbillies whenever we can be!

post #22 of 79

When I was a kid, I went barefoot all summer every summer.

 

However, we lived on a rural commune and the places we walked and played were largely free of dangerous stuff.  (even so, there were plenty of bee stings and sprained toes, and one of my classmates did step on a nail that went right through his foot)

 

My kids need to at least wear flip flops when they're outside.  We live in town, dh, is working on our house (thus occasionally screws, nails, and other stuff end up in the grass). Also, in dh's country there is something in the soil that causes elephantiasis--severe and permanent disfigurement of the feet and lower legs. :(  It is truly horrific, and he was a health worker dealin with people who had it, so he saw the worst of the worst.  He is not comfortable with our children going barefoot, even though he knows rationally that the soil here is different.  He'd rather they get used to putting something on their feet when going outside, and I have no real desire to battle him on that.  It's not an issue worth a battle, to me.

post #23 of 79

My 5 yr. old and 1 yr. old are usually barefoot in the house and outside. I make my 5 yr. old wear shoes inside stores and so forth, and put them on my toddler if she is walking, but not if I am wearing her or putting her in a cart or stroller. My 8 yr. old wears shoes unless he's in our house or yard. He doesn't hate them like his little brother. 

There are worms that enter the body through feet that were a big problem in the south before modern plumbing. I don't think that's a real concern anymore. 

post #24 of 79

How bizarre.  confused.gif  Your neighbor needs to mind her own business!  How irritating.

 

Both my kiddos are barefoot all the time at home.  If we go out in the world, they wear shoes, but it definitely isn't their favorite.
I remember always being barefoot as a kid.  It's just crazy that your neighbor would take issue with that in a situation you've deemed acceptable for little feet.

 

I hope she stops harassing you!
 

post #25 of 79

As long as the temperature is okay, I don't see a problem with it.  I have considered calling CPS before though on our neighbors that let their children run around in 35-40 degree weather in pjs, barefoot, with an unzipped winter jacket completely unsupervised (ages 3, 4, & 5).  

post #26 of 79

We don't wear shoes in the house at all.  As for going outside, my 4 year old DD is mostly barefoot when she is playing on our street.  I don't have a problem with it and she is most comfortable that way.  What does bother me is the mothers of the other kids she plays with telling my DD to put her shoes on.  I have found myself trying to get DD to wear shoes because of that... but actually after reading this thread I feel more confident with our choice. ;)

post #27 of 79

My children run around barefoot most of the time.  But my toddler...I can hardly stand that he's roughing up those sweet, smooth, fat feet, kwim?  

post #28 of 79

As a child my mom was militant about us wearing shoes because she did experience a nail in the foot as a child. Now my kids and I go barefoot most of the time at home and at parks and the toddler is barefoot and naked most of the time (although he has finally learned to put clothes on to go outside)  :) My kids only put shoes on if we are going somewhere where they are required..we once got yelled at in a store because my then 13mo didn't have shoes on and was walking around the store..I didn't even own shoes for him at that point. My oldest son is soon to be 13 and 2 months ago was the first time we ever had any semi serious type problem from being barefoot. My 2 year old did get something in his foot and it went unnoticed until he had an infection...he wouldn't let me near it but a quick trip to the Dr. to have it lanced and drained was all that was needed. He and his foot are all healed up and he still has no interest in wearing shoes. When that happened a friend said to me "now you will start making sure they wear their shoes"...I laughed and thought why? There are calculated risks in everything we do and one little incident in 13 years doesn't seem to risky to me..plus I don't think I could give up the freedom of being barefoot, I wear flip flops until there is more then a few inches of snow on the ground..my fat feet don't like shoes!

post #29 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hjdmom24 View Post

As a child my mom was militant about us wearing shoes because she did experience a nail in the foot as a child. \\

 

I've come across this one before. It honestly kind of boggles me. I get the broken glass thing, but not the nail thing. I had a nail in the foot as a child, too. It went right through my shoe. I know at least one other person who had the same thing happen. Nails are nasty, and if they're strong and sharp enough to go through wood, the sole of a shoe isn't likely to stop them, yk? However, if it hadn't happened to me, I probably wouldn't think of it that way.

 

Now my kids and I go barefoot most of the time at home and at parks and the toddler is barefoot and naked most of the time (although he has finally learned to put clothes on to go outside)  :) My kids only put shoes on if we are going somewhere where they are required..we once got yelled at in a store because my then 13mo didn't have shoes on and was walking around the store..I didn't even own shoes for him at that point. My oldest son is soon to be 13 and 2 months ago was the first time we ever had any semi serious type problem from being barefoot. My 2 year old did get something in his foot and it went unnoticed until he had an infection...he wouldn't let me near it but a quick trip to the Dr. to have it lanced and drained was all that was needed. He and his foot are all healed up and he still has no interest in wearing shoes. When that happened a friend said to me "now you will start making sure they wear their shoes"...I laughed and thought why? There are calculated risks in everything we do and one little incident in 13 years doesn't seem to risky to me..plus I don't think I could give up the freedom of being barefoot, I wear flip flops until there is more then a few inches of snow on the ground..my fat feet don't like shoes!

 

Definitely. I wore shoes pretty regularly for years. I've largely quit wearing them, because I'm experiencing foot pain of various kinds, as well as slight hammer toes. I don't think people realize how many problems can actually be caused by shoes. (Admittely, in my case, the problem is probably caused by being unable to buy shoes that truly fit properly - but I suspect many people are in shoes that almost fit, but not quite...feet are all different, after all.)

 

I just don't get why this issues seems to prey on people so badly. I think there are risks of various kinds to both wearing shoes and going barefoot, and it's up to each person or parent to decide for themselves and/or their families where they want to draw the lines. Maybe my neighbours are increasing their children's risk of developing foot problems later in life (and maybe not), but I have no interest in going over there and getting in their faces about it, yk?



 

post #30 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatsCradle View Post

FYI:  my grandmother and mother (we're talking early 20th to mid-20th century here) had a mortal fear of bare-footing.  They believed that there were special worms that could enter one's feet.  I'm not sure what science that was based upon and they were in area that was mostly rural. 


Hookworm can be acquired that way, but it's rare these days in North America. 

 

post #31 of 79

My younger daughter and I will walk around the neighborhood barefoot sometimes.  I think sometimes people get really attached to their ways of doing things, and have this knee-jerk negative reaction to behaviors others think are good that they just KNOW are bad.  My mom can be that way, and the amount of hyperbole she used in describing herself and her behaviors compared to our behaviors, wow.  Like she gave her babies baths every night and had them in bed by 6 pm, and if you didn't do that, well, that is just child abuse, plain and simple. There were many times she voiced her opinion on when social services should be called, but it was all just talk, a way to show how outrageous she found my sister's way of raising children to be.  I was more shielded from this as I had moved away by the time I had children, but we'd always call her out on it anyway (like, at least we didn't smoke around our babies, at least we don't chase our toddlers with the belt, etc.).  If it was a stranger, I am not sure what I'd do, if I'd ignore it or acknowledge it in anyway.

post #32 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post




Hookworm can be acquired that way, but it's rare these days in North America. 

 



Oh yeah, after I learned about hookworms from an 8th grade science teacher who described the process, I stopped going barefoot outside for awhile, except on the sidewalk.  But I was paranoid about walking on the grass until I realized that wasn't a problem.

post #33 of 79

Quote:

Originally Posted by limabean View Post

Hookworm can be acquired that way, but it's rare these days in North America. 

 



Yeah, my dad and grandparents were fearful of hookworm (I grew up in the tropics), and my parents discouraged me from going barefoot. Additionally, the Asian custom of not wearing shoes in the house comes from not wanting to track in dirt....so it makes little sense to go barefoot, get your feet all dirty, and then walk inside. On the rare occasions that I did go barefoot, my parents would pitch a fit and make me scrub my feet under the garden hose before I could come in. The dirt in Hawaii is rusty colored and stains like crazy. So I guess wearing some sort of footwear is just something ingrained in me.

 

My kids rarely go barefoot (it's cold for much of the year here, and we live in the city), but they've still managed to step on bees here and there. No glass or nails yet, though.

post #34 of 79


In my experience, some folks are very judgmental of parents with "large families" (which, in our culture, often means more than two or three kids) and extremely judgmental of homeschooling parents (I actually mean mothers and not parents, 'cause it just seems to me that most of the judgment is directed at the moms). And, if a family has more than two or three kids and homeschools, it seems like the moms need to have a nearly godlike or Martha Stewart-like (minus the felony conviction) aura for people to see her as "qualified" to live her life in the way in which she is choosing to live it.

 

I just have two children, but I have definitely gotten some flack for homeschooling, simply because I don't come across (and certainly am nothing like) the god/Martha Stewart hybrid that some people insist you have to be before you can dare to actually keep your school-aged kids with you all day. My sister, who actually did call CPS on me a few years back, once told me that, to homeschool, you had to be really super-organized in order to keep on top of everything. She said she wasn't qualified to do it, so, I guess in her eyes, most of us mere mortals were/are most certainly not even in the ballpark of qualifying. 

 

I think it's people like that who are so intent on verbally duking-it-out with anyone who is doing something that they themselves don't feel capable of doing. I don't mean just the people who say, "I could never handle having so many kids" or "I could never handle homeschooling," and certainly not the ones who choose not to do so either of these things -- but the ones who simply can't. stand. the idea that some other mom is doing this THING that they don't feel up to doing themselves, and this other mom actually has the GALL to appear to be, for the most part, enjoying her life and enjoying her kids -- you know, not totally stressed out and acting like a drill sergeant, all hyped up about keeping everybody on target.

 

Oh, and, yes, my girls and I are always barefoot in the house and sometimes outdoors, too. I agree with the others who say that CPS has other fish to fry.

 

I'm glad you shared this, cappuccinosmom:
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cappuccinosmom View Post

 Also, in dh's country there is something in the soil that causes elephantiasis--severe and permanent disfigurement of the feet and lower legs. :(  It is truly horrific, and he was a health worker dealin with people who had it, so he saw the worst of the worst.  He is not comfortable with our children going barefoot, even though he knows rationally that the soil here is different.  He'd rather they get used to putting something on their feet when going outside, and I have no real desire to battle him on that.  It's not an issue worth a battle, to me.



We have some neighbors who are from another part of the world, and, a few years back, their teen daughter told dd1 that she and dd2 were going to be sick if they kept playing in the mud. She commented that everytime she came to our house, she got sick. I was never sure just what this was all about, but it seemed to me that they were trying to trash-talk us to their kids (and inadvertently to our own children, too, through their teenaged mouthpiece) because their younger children were always wanting, so badly, to come over and join our girls in their little pool. They sometimes let them come over, but would get all upset if any of them got wet or dirty.

 

I suppose there might be some bad diseases in the soil of their homeland, too. So maybe they weren't just trying to persuade their kids not to get dirty...maybe they really thought we were courting some horrible plague.

 

post #35 of 79

DS goes barefoot all the time. As do I. Especially when around the house, the yard, or in a big grassy park.

post #36 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post

We have some neighbors who are from another part of the world, and, a few years back, their teen daughter told dd1 that she and dd2 were going to be sick if they kept playing in the mud. She commented that everytime she came to our house, she got sick. I was never sure just what this was all about, but it seemed to me that they were trying to trash-talk us to their kids (and inadvertently to our own children, too, through their teenaged mouthpiece) because their younger children were always wanting, so badly, to come over and join our girls in their little pool. They sometimes let them come over, but would get all upset if any of them got wet or dirty.

 

I suppose there might be some bad diseases in the soil of their homeland, too. So maybe they weren't just trying to persuade their kids not to get dirty...maybe they really thought we were courting some horrible plague.

 


I can somehow relate to this mortal fear of soil or dirt or being dirty as I grew up in a different culture and environment as well. It really took me a while to not get squeamish about DH going barefoot in the yard and has taken me longer to actually allow my kids to do the same. And yes, I have visions of hookworm entering our bodies through our feet still. LOL
 

 

post #37 of 79

My kids are barefoot at home (inside and out) always... 

post #38 of 79

My DD1 who has autism was always w/o shoes.

 

So long as his foot has good arches, then its all good. The thing to avoid is flip flops. They will encourage horrible walking patterns and foot development.

post #39 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beenmum View Post

My DD1 who has autism was always w/o shoes.

 

So long as his foot has good arches, then its all good. The thing to avoid is flip flops. They will encourage horrible walking patterns and foot development.

 

I think I've worn flip-flops about a dozen times in my entire life, and none of my kids (except ds1, who is old enough to buy his own clothes) even owns them. I don't like those things. DS1 and I basically wear them when we go to the outdoor pool in the complex, so that we don't have to walk back with wet bare feet, as they pick up bits of dirt and grit.

 

I told another friend about this. She lives in this complex (but she's a friend from before either of us lived here). She asked me which neighbour it was, and then said, "oh, the one with the two dog? She's nuts!". DS1's ex-girlfriend's mom said the same thing. I've had very minimal contact with the neighbour in question, but it seems I'm not the only one who has trouble dealing with her.
 

 

post #40 of 79

I'd just chalk it up to the fact she is nuts. orngbiggrin.gif DD1 and I both strongly dislike shoes, we tend to only wear shoes that we can kick off the second we are able to, clogs in the winter and the dreaded flip flops in the summer (we both adore them). Never anything that tie unless we really have to! We don't run around barefoot outside our house because we have massive pine trees everywhere, needles in the feet aren't exactly comfortable. At the parks we do though. DD2 doesn't have quite the shoe hatred DD1 does, but she tend to take them off often. DS has to wear orthotics and must wear shoes, always sneakers, most of the day. I honestly feel so sorry for him, I can't imagine being stuck in shoes that much. greensad.gif

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