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The special kids go back to school! (2011 edition) - Page 3

post #41 of 67
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmerBeth View Post
  And he is digging his heels in about accommodations on tests (like answering every other question) to make up for processing speed, because he thinks it's unfair if everyone else isn't doing the same thing. (I think it's unfair that he gets every math question right and ends up with a 60% because he can't finish the test at that speedshrug.gif.


perhaps when he understands that it could be the difference between passing and failing he will feel differently. I'd send a note to whoever your coordinator is and make sure he/she knows what his grades are like without this accommodation. It's going to be easier to fix this earlier rather than waiting until he has an actual F or D on a report card. If this is happening in multiple classes, it could impact his ability to advance to the next grade next year.

 


 

Quote:

Originally Posted by melissa17s View Post

 

I know that sometimes they can not accommodate the standardized tests, but for the rest of his tests, it would allow for a better assessment of his ability.  My ds got no time limits because the he generally will not do the work if it is timed.  This is also one of the accommodations I see the most at the college level.  

 

 

 

It varies from state to state. Some states allow extra time for kids with IEPs
 

 

post #42 of 67

So far the plan is to put the accommodation in place, regardless, and he did still sign the form for adaptations (I could over-ride him at this age, but the preference is for the student to sign their own forms, too)  He's more in a state of constant verbal complaint, and I'm not sure on test day if he'll have a blow-out.

 

Regarding standardized tests, we're Canadian so slightly different deal so we still have them.  The last few standardized tests he had to take it the exact same way as everyone else, but there was a note made that he was on adaptations.  His academics aren't currently on an IPP (like your IEP), but he is on one for social skills.  Even with the processing speed (and he's in the less than 5%, so it is very slow), he's still been at the point of passing.  My concern is that this will get more difficult as he progresses through the grades, and what's passing now might not later.  The coordinatior is trying to come up with the least obvious way to accommodate possible, since a lot of the digging in is fear of teasing (that's why she was thinking of every other question, so that the extra time thing isn't obvious).  I guess we'll just have to take it as we go and put the best face on everything possible.

post #43 of 67
Hi all,
It's so nice to find you others here. My DS with SPD started Kindergarten last week. He insisted on "ear protectors" - a handkerchief tied around his head covering his ears. He is in an integrated public school in NYC, 40% special Ed, 60% gen Ed, and this ratio is in each classroom. Each classroom has a special Ed teacher, a gen Ed teacher and an aide. Classes are limited to 24-25 kids, so a nice ratio. We worked hard to get him in there.

Thank God for this environment, because still every day is started with tears, and yesterday they discussed fire drills in school and he is so scared of them he cried much of the re
st of the day. The aide gave him a little cardboard person to carry in his pocket, and said that the person wanted to come out when he was crying but he should try not to cry so he could stay in?!? He said (he's a smart cookie) So I tried not to cry when the aide was around.

Today he was terrified to go back, now that the issue of fire drills is in his mind. His SPD sometimes looks a lot like OCD.

So painful. I think it about as good of an environment as he could have. Some of the reward systems seem a bit much for me - not my style. The teachers seem nice, the special Ed teacher seems a bit harsh, but the gen Ed teacher seems sweet. I like the aide, but DS doesn't so much. He really looks for a warm relationship as a base, and even with the ratio, the teachers seem like overworked, slightly overwhelmed NYC teachers.

So glad to have this forum to talk about it. smile.gif
post #44 of 67
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pitchfork View Post
yesterday they discussed fire drills in school and he is so scared of them he cried much of the rest of the day.
 


poor kid!!

 

Our school takes some of the SPD kids out before the drill so they don't have to hear the loudest of the noise or be in the crowd existing. Our fire marshall knows and doesn't mind, but he likes the school. thumb.gif

 

This is a toughie for schools because they have to do the drills. Its the law.

 

Does your son's classroom include lots of nice sensory things?

 

post #45 of 67

It's been a little rough here for my oldest, middle schooler.  She does best with solid routine, feeling comfortable in her environment.  It stinks that standardized testing has taken up almost an entire week already.  This is the first year she's seemed to feel the stress of it.  That, plus a few other changes, has made her feel and look, more scattered than usual.  Combine that with very, very high expectations of personal responsibility by the teachers, a missed homework assignment, and my kid was in tears.  I really like my kid's school, and her teachers, but darn it, sometimes a child can only do so much.  Testing is enough.  Get through it, and lets call it a day, and move on to the next week.

 

Aghh...I'm frustrated.  My kid is a pleaser, rarely misses work, and working so hard.  She's also an adolescent, and everything that comes along with that, so I expect some blips from my normally uber compliant child, and we've seen it. She's now feeling like she's failed, teachers are upset with her, and I think we're going to need to work hard to turn this ship around.

 

 

post #46 of 67
Originally Posted by karne View Post

It's been a little rough here for my oldest, middle schooler.  She does best with solid routine, feeling comfortable in her environment.  It stinks that standardized testing has taken up almost an entire week already.  This is the first year she's seemed to feel the stress of it.  That, plus a few other changes, has made her feel and look, more scattered than usual.  Combine that with very, very high expectations of personal responsibility by the teachers, a missed homework assignment, and my kid was in tears.  I really like my kid's school, and her teachers, but darn it, sometimes a child can only do so much.  Testing is enough.  Get through it, and lets call it a day, and move on to the next week.

 

Aghh...I'm frustrated.  My kid is a pleaser, rarely misses work, and working so hard.  She's also an adolescent, and everything that comes along with that, so I expect some blips from my normally uber compliant child, and we've seen it. She's now feeling like she's failed, teachers are upset with her, and I think we're going to need to work hard to turn this ship around.


Does she have an IEP or a 504? And if she does, are all her teachers aware of it? And if aware that she has one, do they understand their role?

 

Maybe she would benefit from a phone with apps that help organization and frequent alarms to keep her on track. Do the teachers at this school have/utilize their own web pages where they post assignments?

 

Wrightslaw - Transition - Legal Requirements for Transition ...

 

Middle School: 504 Qs

 

post #47 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by pitchfork View Post

Hi all,
It's so nice to find you others here. My DS with SPD started Kindergarten last week. He insisted on "ear protectors" - a handkerchief tied around his head covering his ears. He is in an integrated public school in NYC, 40% special Ed, 60% gen Ed, and this ratio is in each classroom. Each classroom has a special Ed teacher, a gen Ed teacher and an aide. Classes are limited to 24-25 kids, so a nice ratio. We worked hard to get him in there.

Thank God for this environment, because still every day is started with tears, and yesterday they discussed fire drills in school and he is so scared of them he cried much of the re
st of the day. The aide gave him a little cardboard person to carry in his pocket, and said that the person wanted to come out when he was crying but he should try not to cry so he could stay in?!? He said (he's a smart cookie) So I tried not to cry when the aide was around.

Today he was terrified to go back, now that the issue of fire drills is in his mind. His SPD sometimes looks a lot like OCD.

So painful. I think it about as good of an environment as he could have. Some of the reward systems seem a bit much for me - not my style. The teachers seem nice, the special Ed teacher seems a bit harsh, but the gen Ed teacher seems sweet. I like the aide, but DS doesn't so much. He really looks for a warm relationship as a base, and even with the ratio, the teachers seem like overworked, slightly overwhelmed NYC teachers.

So glad to have this forum to talk about it. smile.gif
 



My DS was older than yours when we had this issue (9 years old at the time), but what the school did to help with the fire drills is something that could maybe be considered for your son as he gets older and a little more accustomed to sensory sensitivities, especially for dealing with the more obsessing type behavior around the drills.  DS was asked to accompany the older child who was on fire bell duty.  Basically, every day, the bells need to be checked on that they are in working order, and during drills there is a captain.  The 13 year old he was paired with was very good with him and patient, and it meant that in a drill he had one on one with a kid he thought was cool and doing a neat job.  Helping with the fire bells seemed to help him feel like he could take charge of something that he found really loud and scary.

post #48 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emmeline II View Post


Does she have an IEP or a 504? And if she does, are all her teachers aware of it? And if aware that she has one, do they understand their role?

 

Maybe she would benefit from a phone with apps that help organization and frequent alarms to keep her on track. Do the teachers at this school have/utilize their own web pages where they post assignments?

 

Wrightslaw - Transition - Legal Requirements for Transition ...

 

Middle School: 504 Qs

 


 

She does.  I think the issue is that she is so "together", so organized (I can think of one other time she missed a homework assignment in the past year), that it's easy to forget that sometimes even high achieving kids with LD's can be vulnerable to stress.  In general, I think this is one of the pitfalls that kids like her can fall into-they're good students, good athletes, school works for them because they play by the rules.......but sometimes being "good" is too much to uphold-the expectations are too high.  We've spent a lot of time talking about how it's OK to hate feeling pressured by test, how you don't have to like every teacher, how it's fine to not be "perfect"-no one is. She has good stress relief skills.

 

This is middle school we're talking about here-even kids with great coping skills, good support system, and a solid sense of themselves, like my kid, can be vulnerable to the pressures that are part of middle school and this age.  Having an LD means that there is an extra layer of work there.  The teachers are pros at the adolescence piece, the team is very strong, etc.  It's just that, even with that, there are going to be bumps on the road.  I don't think 7th grade is an easy time.

 

 

post #49 of 67
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by karne View Post

 

  It's just that, even with that, there are going to be bumps on the road.  I don't think 7th grade is an easy time.

 


no, it's not an easy time. greensad.gif Seventh grade was the year that I got my DD into cognitive behavior therapy. She learned techniques for dealing with stress. Each week she and her counseling would go over the most stressful parts of the week and talk through which CBT would be most helpful in similar situations in the future. Insurance paid for it. Her counselor was great and helped with communication at the school, making recommendations for tweaking her 504 plan, etc.

 

It was a tough year. I don't know about other LDs, but I know that for kids even on the highest end of the autism spectrum, anxiety and depression are common at this age.

 

post #50 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post




no, it's not an easy time. greensad.gifSeventh grade was the year that I got my DD into cognitive behavior therapy. She learned techniques for dealing with stress. Each week she and her counseling would go over the most stressful parts of the week and talk through which CBT would be most helpful in similar situations in the future. Insurance paid for it. Her counselor was great and helped with communication at the school, making recommendations for tweaking her 504 plan, etc.

 

It was a tough year. I don't know about other LDs, but I know that for kids even on the highest end of the autism spectrum, anxiety and depression are common at this age.

 


No, we're not at depression, and the anxiety is situational.  It's really more frustration with the testing, not wanting to have accommodations that are avail to her for her dyslexia (embarrassing), settling into a changing schedule, and truthfully, being a little hormonal.  

 

ETA: To answer your question Linda, I think, but don't have the stats, that the combo of a learning difference and adolescence bear watching for feelings of depression/anxiety, which we do, as well as frequent check ins.  

 

post #51 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmerBeth View Post






My DS was older than yours when we had this issue (9 years old at the time), but what the school did to help with the fire drills is something that could maybe be considered for your son as he gets older and a little more accustomed to sensory sensitivities, especially for dealing with the more obsessing type behavior around the drills.  DS was asked to accompany the older child who was on fire bell duty.  Basically, every day, the bells need to be checked on that they are in working order, and during drills there is a captain.  The 13 year old he was paired with was very good with him and patient, and it meant that in a drill he had one on one with a kid he thought was cool and doing a neat job.  Helping with the fire bells seemed to help him feel like he could take charge of something that he found really loud and scary.



FarmerBeth, this is a fantastic idea!  Thank you.  I think he would do really way with some way to get control over his fears like this.  This type of approach has worked with him in the past, at his preschool, he and his SEIT (one on one special ed teacher) made a book of every person who worked in the school to give him confidence about being there.

 

Linda, no, there are not really any sensory accommodations in the classroom, surprisingly.  DS wears a hankerchief around his ears/head to dampen sound, and especially in case of fire drills.  Fortunately, it passes as a fashion statement.  :)

 

I'm not really sure what sensory things to ask for in the classroom...I am trying to develop a rapport slowly with the teachers, because in our area, many parents, of any type of children are very demanding about accommodations being made for their children, and it can really alienate and burn out the teachers.  That said, they called me from school on Thursday because DS had soiled himself so badly it had run into his shoes.  This child has NEVER had potty accident since he turned 2.  He was EC'd, and his sensory issues tended to contribute to being highly motivated to not have an accident.  I was pretty freaked out, but they handled it fine, and he was happy as a clam in clean clothes and no shoes in the nurses office when I picked him up.

 

Night terrors started up again in the night last night, and he cried for 20 mins upon awakening, so he is stressed, but on the other hand, he got through drop-off yesterday without crying! Yay!  They are encouraging him to keep it together at school and not cry, so I figure he may need to let it out at home.

 

Thanks for being here, Mamas

 

 

post #52 of 67

My DS is starting his first year of preschool this year and he has an aide paid for through an Integrated Daycare Subsidy program. So far the transition has been a little bit bumpy but we're some how managing. My DS does not do change well and has been in daycare full time 5 days a week and has now switched to 2 days a week in half day preschool/half day home and 3 full days of daycare per week, and he's having trouble making the adjustment, I've tried my best to make it as smooth as possible for him but I'm unsure as to what else I could be doing. Does anyone have any ideas?

 

To give a little back ground my son has Severe global developmental delay with ASD symptoms that are being watched by a pediatric rehabilitation team and his pediatrician. My son was severely delayed in speech/language, fine and gross motor skills, as well as cognitive/behavioral abilities. He still has issues with all of these things and we work closely with his Ped's team, Early Intervention Therapist, and Pediatrician.

post #53 of 67

Sounds like you're all going through a lot transitioning back or into school. My DD has been through 2 weeks and we've had mixed results. School is going great. She has a paid aide that she shares with another girl who's a bit more special needs than she is. We struggled with before and after care. Before was chaos in a room. Total fail. So we talked to her teacher about it and she was okay with us dropping DD off to her classroom in the morning and setting her up with an activity. This worked well for a few days then we needed to work with DD to remind her to keep it together and not fall apart on us at drop off. After care is more structured, so while it's too busy for DD, she can still manage it okay. We're putting up with a lot more behavior problems outside of school as she adjusts, though. LOADS of meltdowns and tantrums happening at the moment. Lots of impatience, yelling at people, pendulum swings, etc. It'll work out. We just have to be patient.

post #54 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetmama26 View Post

My DS is starting his first year of preschool this year and he has an aide paid for through an Integrated Daycare Subsidy program. So far the transition has been a little bit bumpy but we're some how managing. My DS does not do change well and has been in daycare full time 5 days a week and has now switched to 2 days a week in half day preschool/half day home and 3 full days of daycare per week, and he's having trouble making the adjustment, I've tried my best to make it as smooth as possible for him but I'm unsure as to what else I could be doing. Does anyone have any ideas?

 

To give a little back ground my son has Severe global developmental delay with ASD symptoms that are being watched by a pediatric rehabilitation team and his pediatrician. My son was severely delayed in speech/language, fine and gross motor skills, as well as cognitive/behavioral abilities. He still has issues with all of these things and we work closely with his Ped's team, Early Intervention Therapist, and Pediatrician.



I have one small suggestion and that's to make the routine on the half preschool/half home days as similar to the full daycare days' routine as possible.  Wake up to get ready at about the same time, if he has a nap or quiet time at daycare, try to have a nap or quiet time at home around the same time.  Make sure he gets at least as much afternoon active play as at daycare and that meal times are as similar as possible.  It sounds like your little guy has a lot to deal with, and the transition to half day preschool probably feels pretty big to him, so keeping the other stuff as similar as possible helps.

post #55 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmerBeth View Post





I have one small suggestion and that's to make the routine on the half preschool/half home days as similar to the full daycare days' routine as possible.  Wake up to get ready at about the same time, if he has a nap or quiet time at daycare, try to have a nap or quiet time at home around the same time.  Make sure he gets at least as much afternoon active play as at daycare and that meal times are as similar as possible.  It sounds like your little guy has a lot to deal with, and the transition to half day preschool probably feels pretty big to him, so keeping the other stuff as similar as possible helps.



Thank you so much for the suggestion, I try to keep everything as similar as possible, he doesn't  nap during the day I wish he would lol. But I will keep on trying to keep everything even more to his daycare routine

post #56 of 67


I have a feeling I will really have to keep on top of the school, I requested a IEP meeting concerning homework. The lady that called me back said her homework is modified, i fail to see how 24 spelling words is modified homework when her homework is suppost to be modified to suit her needs,and it make her spelling homework hard to do since of on the spelling options is to take spelling words and put them into 2 columns and that honestly seems like more work for her teacher if they do spelling tests. Last year she was doing 1st grade homework packets, before we moved she was doing 2nd grade work but only 5 spelling words, less reading homework, less math homework. So far being only two months into 3rd grade her homework isn't modified at all, besides them saying it is in that they gave her 24 spelling words.

Today she brought home the results of Star reading testing that was done today,
Her last test was on 8/29/2011 her Grade Equivalent was 2.1 and for today it was 1.5. Her Zone Of Proximal Development was 2.1-3.1 on 8/29 and today it was 1.5-2.5. I know it's all a estimate but wow what a drop.


post #57 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCaliMommy View Post



I have a feeling I will really have to keep on top of the school, I requested a IEP meeting concerning homework. The lady that called me back said her homework is modified, i fail to see how 24 spelling words is modified homework when her homework is suppost to be modified to suit her needs,and it make her spelling homework hard to do since of on the spelling options is to take spelling words and put them into 2 columns and that honestly seems like more work for her teacher if they do spelling tests. Last year she was doing 1st grade homework packets, before we moved she was doing 2nd grade work but only 5 spelling words, less reading homework, less math homework. So far being only two months into 3rd grade her homework isn't modified at all, besides them saying it is in that they gave her 24 spelling words.

Today she brought home the results of Star reading testing that was done today,
Her last test was on 8/29/2011 her Grade Equivalent was 2.1 and for today it was 1.5. Her Zone Of Proximal Development was 2.1-3.1 on 8/29 and today it was 1.5-2.5. I know it's all a estimate but wow what a drop.


Even if she's getting easier spelling words, I don't see how so much of them is helpful to any child, let alone one with special needs.  I'm also wondering if that testing drop may be from her brain being overtired.  I think you're right that you'll have to keep on top of the school.  I hope your IEP meeting goes well.
 

 

post #58 of 67

Sigh. Still waiting to hear from DD1's school. They start ITBS testing next week and I'm not allowing her to do it. She is dyslexic, SPD, with anxiety issues. She JUST starting reading this spring. She is not ready for testing, her therapist and I had a long discussion about it and agreed with me. I just want to know what days and when they will be testing, they have ignored me so far. Worst possible case, she just misses two weeks of school because I won't send her until it is over. Small, private school so no IEP or anything like that. 

post #59 of 67

DS1 (age 9, with MERLD or ASD, take your pick) is currently in a mainstream class at our public school. It's going really well. We have a good IEP, and he's getting speech 2X per week through the school. One session is one to one with the therapist, and the other session is a social skills group on the playground.  His teacher is very sensitive to the language disorder aspects and is working on him with it. He loves his teacher and he loves his class. We did have a problem with lunch room behavior, but that has been straightened out. He is not going to after-care, but is walking home and letting himself in. (His dad gets home about 30 minutes later.) We got his first progress report and he has 6 As and a B (in language arts).

 

 

post #60 of 67

We start school so much later out here in the Pacific NW, so it's only been a couple of weeks... but so far, so good. DD's sped ed preschool teachers are absolutely delighted with how her personality and skills have changed over the summer. She's really showing much more of an interest in social interactions (comparatively) and is using so much more language. They feel so much more hopeful about their capacity to teach her. We see things incrementally with her, so it's gratifying for someone else to notice and point out the positive developments.

 

Meanwhile, she's also turned into a bit of a rascal and has started pushing younger kids at daycare (in addition to going through a dumping things out/knocking things over spurt at home). Thankfully, they are very supportive and willing to work with her, but boy oh boy I hope this phase passes quickly. Apparently she bowled over a little one the other day and really upset the other kid. Yikes! This is so unlike our sweet mild mannered shy girl... but I am hopeful that this is just her misguided attempts at initiating social interaction, and that we can help her learn more appropriate ways of playing.

 

Hugs and good vibes to all you mamas and papas helping your special kiddos through another school year -

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