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Need book suggestions for myself. I'm picky! - Page 3

post #41 of 54

Alright, I am going to suggest a book but bear with me. It is dark, but humorous. So if you not a fan of black comedies than it might not be for you.

 It is call The Toy Collector by James Gunn. I have to confess it is dark and at time demented, but if you are looking for a thought provoking read than this is it. 

There are some other book. Little Children by Tom Perotta, The Time Traveller's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger 

Any of Steve Martin's books are fantastic.  Bonk by Mary Roach is great. The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer

 

 

 

 

post #42 of 54

Terry Pratchett's books are funny fantasy.  I recommend starting with The Wee Free Men.  His books straddle childrens and adult.  Neil Gaimen is pretty good too.  Each books has a different feel I find.

 

 

post #43 of 54

A couple more good YA authors:

 

  • one of my favorite YA series -- sort of a 'fractured fairy tales' -- is the Dealing with Dragons series by Patricia Wrede.  
  • Similarly, Robin McKinley has some really lovely fairy-tale "retellings": Beauty, Rose Daughter, and Spindle's End are favorites of mine.  
post #44 of 54

I recently loved:


Room by Emma Donohue

Don't Breathe a Word by Jennifer McMahon

and am reading Once Upon a River by Bonnie Jo Campbell

 

recently finished all the Maisie Dobbs series by Jacqueline Winspear - Spectacular!!

post #45 of 54

Here are some I have enjoyed which were not mentioned yet...

 

Jean Auel's Clan of the Cave Bear series; set at time when cave men and homo sapiens co-existed

Herman Wouk's War and Remembrance series; WW2 novels

Arundahti Roy's God of Small Things; if I had to recommend one book not yet listed, this would be it.

 

post #46 of 54

I love reading all of your suggestions and hope to find some new authors.

 

The author that I love at the moment is Suzanne Brockmann.  She has a 16 book series called Troubleshooters.  It is about a Navy SEAL team and the men and their lives. The series is mostly defined as Romantic/Adventure. As the series progresses she brings in some characters from the FBI and about book 6 or so one of the SEALs leaves to start a private company.  All in all there are about 10 - 15 main characters that are followed thru the books.  Of course, each book has a main story arc but the minor arcs are the connections between all of the books.  I would recommend starting at the beginning with The Unsung Hero.  Also, the first 6 or so books have a third arc that is a flashback to WWII with those characters relating to the present day.  I would also like to mention that at times the romance gets hot and heavy, the men are sailors so the language can get raunchy, there are gay romances and pairings, and also some other readers have opinions that Suz can get on her soapbox so to speak and sound just a little preachy.  All in all, I think they are a good read and I enjoy them.

 

I personally listen to then on audio and admit that the first 5 or 6 have a lot to be desired narrator wise but once you get to the ones read by Patrick Lawlor and Melanie Eubanks/Rene Raudman then you have audio gold.  (The 2 narrators are because Suz has a way of writing scenes from either the male or female perspective and the dual narrators due the books justice.)

 

Suz also has another book series out called Tall, Dark and Dangerous.  I haven't read those books yet but they seem to be similar with the characters following from book to book.  She also has some stand alone books and at one time wrote books that were published by Harlequin Romance. 

 

 

 

post #47 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Comtessa View Post

I have to admit to loving loving loving the Outlander series.  Sure, they're bodice-rippers, but they're smart bodice-rippers.  And honestly, who among us doesn't appreciate a ripped bodice every once in a while???  FIREdevil.gif

 

 



Comtessa, I'm simultaneously reading the "Drums of Autumn" in the Outlander series and the last of Steig Larrsens trilogy, "the Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest". I keep raiding the candy dish that is Outlander, but I just wanted to come back and say that I think they're liable to be very historically inaccurate based on my depth of knowledge about the areas in "Drums of Autumn" (the one set in NC). She's got so much geography and flora just wrong (cottonwood trees??) and while she got the bugs and heat right almost all the stuff about Cross Creek is just made up, but there is/was (name changed) real place called Cross Creek (called so because two creeks crossed not because a creek crossed the Cape Fear river). It's like she pulled a couple of place names out of the history books and then just made up the rest. All the things she brings up like the Regulators are very easy to research. You can just do a quick google or go to your library, but she changes it all around. I think it's one thing to set a story in a place like NC or Scotland and then maybe make up a fake town and populate it with fictional characters and happenings, but to take actual places and historical happenings and change them all around — not so cool in my book, but I'm still reading her books! Barbara Kingsolver would never pull something like that. I'm very familiar with many of the places in her books, too, and they all ring true. 

 

I did end up really liking "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo" series, too. I think it's interesting that there's a Swedish movie version from like 2009 and an American version is coming out next year. 

post #48 of 54

Can't guarantee these will work for you, but they've gotten me through long BF sessions and waiting for baby to arrive in the first place.

 

The King of Elfland's Daughter by Lord Dunsany (apparently the forefather of modern fantasy literature; my edition has a foreword by Neil Gaiman - hey! there's an author you might enjoy!) - I really liked this book.

 

Writer Joan Aiken - she was prolific, wrote all kinds of stuff. My sister and I got into her in our pre-teens, long before we'd ever heard of Harry Potter. Our first encounter with her was Armitage, Armitage, Fly Away Home. Her adventure series are so engrossing - I'm talking about the Nightbirds on Nantucket series and the "wolves" series. So, I guess you could say these are young adult books, and I really did love them as a young adult. If I ever re-visit them, I hope I still like them! This is one of my best-kept reading secrets! Hope Hollywood doesn't get a hold of it. 

 

Did you try Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events? (the movie did not do the books justice)

 

I have a predilection for kids' books, as you can see.

 

But, some light, fun easy reading that's also thoughtful is Carl Hiaasen - eco murder mystery writer!

 

And, I'm working on Salt by Mark Kurlansky. The history of salt! It touches on science, history, culture, etc. in a way that's easy and entertaining.

 

 

post #49 of 54

I just finished 'A Discovery of Witches' and I really enjoyed it. It is kind of like Twilight for adults, but a lot more interesting and intelligent. And I heard the 'Hunger Games' series is great.

post #50 of 54

dh & i both got sucked in to the song of ice and fire series (game of thrones)

and are both on the second one, clash of kings.  we'll be working on those for a while.

 

and have i posted already about how VERY much i loved the magicians and the magician king????  if you like that kind of stuff (it's harry potter esque for grown ups) i was most enthused.

 

 

post #51 of 54

Ooh, my dp just brought home Freud for beginners, a "documentary comic book". It's super educational but super easy to read, and fast. I've seen these kinds of books that are really good for learning academic or "serious" stuff, but in comic book format.

:)

post #52 of 54

 

 I have been reading books from the Endicott Mythic Fiction list http://endicottstudio.typepad.com/jomareadinglists/

and have been enjoying almost all the books that I have read this far. A few were already old favourites of mine that I'd read years before

I hope you all don't mind the long list but I think it is well worth sharing!

This is the list:

 

  1. Kathleen Alcala, Spirits of the Ordinary
  2. Isabel Allende, The House of the Spirits
  3. Kim Antieau, Coyote Cowgirl
  4. Kate Atkinson, Human Croquet
  5. A.A. Attanasio, The Moon's Wife
  6. Peter S. Beagle, A Fine and Private Place
  7. Judith Berman, Bear Daughter
  8. James P. Blaylock, Winter Tides
  9. Richard Bowes, Minions of the Moon
  10. Paul Brandon, Swim the Moon
  11. Kevin Brockmeier, The Truth About Celia
  12. Judy Budnitz, If I Told You Once
  13. Jack Cady, The Off Season
  14. Angela Carter, Nights at the Circus
  15. Ana Castillo, So Far From God
  16. Michael Chabon, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay
    (winner of the Pulitzer Prize)
  17. Vikram Chandra, Red Earth and Pouring Rain
  18. Susanna Clarke, Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell
    (winner of the World Fantasy Award and the Mythopoeic Award)
  19. Rick Collignon, The Journal of Antonio Montoya
  20. John Crowley, Little, Big
    (winner of the World Fantasy Award and the Mythopoeic Award)
  21. Achmat Dangor, Kafka's Curse
  22. Catherine Temma Davidson, The Priest Fainted
  23. Gail Anderson–Dargatz, The Cure for Death by Lightning
  24. Kathryn Davis, The Thin Place
  25. Marele Day, The Lambs of God
  26. Seamus Deane, Reading in the Dark
  27. Louis de Bernieres, The War of Don Emmanuel's Nether Parts
  28. Charles de Lint, Someplace to Be Flying
  29. Bradley Denton, Lunatics
  30. Lilas Desquiron, Reflections of Loko Miwa
  31. Chitra Bannerjee Divakaruni, Mistress of Spices
  32. Keith Donohue, The Stolen Child
  33. Marcia Douglas, Madame Fate
  34. Louise Erdrich, The Antelope Wife
    (winner of the World Fantasy Award)
  35. Laura Esquivel, Like Water for Chocolate
  36. Sia Fiegel, They Who Do Not Grieve
  37. Heinz Insu Fenkl, Memories of My Ghost Brother
  38. Karen Joy Fowler, Sarah Canary
  39. Jeffery Ford, The Girl in the Glass
  40. Neil Gaiman, Anansi Boys
  41. Alan Garner, Strandloper
  42. Molly Gloss, Wild Life (winner of the Tiptree Award)
  43. Lisa Goldstein, Tourists
  44. Hiromi Goto, The Kappa Child (winner of the Tiptree Award)
  45. Richard Grant, Tex and Molly in the Afterlife
  46. Brian Hall, The Saskiad
  47. Elizabeth Hand, Mortal Love
  48. Joanne Harris, Chocolat
  49. Peter Hoeg, The History of Danish Dreams
  50. Alice Hoffman, The Ice Queen
  51. Nina Kiriki Hoffman, A Fistful of Sky
  52. Linda Hogan, Power
  53. Robert Holdstock, Mythago Wood
  54. Nalo Hopkinson, The Salt Roads
  55. Janette Turner Hospital, Last Magician
  56. Keri Hulme, The Bone People (winner of the Booker Prize)
  57. Graham Joyce, The Facts of Life (winner of the World Fantasy Award)
  58. Thomas King, Green Grass, Running Water
  59. Elizabeth Knox, The Vintner's Luck
  60. Larissa Lai, When Fox is a Thousand
  61. Megan Lindholm, Cloven Hooves
  62. Rob Levandoski, Fresh Eggs
  63. Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Love in the Time of Cholera
  64. Regina McBride, The Nature of Water and Air
  65. Patricia A. McKillip, Stepping From the Shadows
  66. Nega Mezleki, The God Who Begat a Jackal
  67. Ib Michael, Prince
  68. Steven Millhauser, Martin Dressler
  69. N. Scott Momaday, The Ancient Child
  70. Christopher Moore, Coyote Blue
  71. Pat Mora, House of Houses
  72. Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore
  73. Lilian Nattel, The River Midnight
  74. Ben Okri, The Famished Road (winner of the Booker Prize)
  75. Louis Owens, Bone Game
  76. Gisèle Pineau, The Drifting of Spirits
  77. Susan Power, The Grass Dancer
  78. Tim Powers, Last Call
  79. Eden Robinson, Monkey Beach
  80. Matt Ruff, Fool on the Hill
  81. Salman Rushdie, The Satanic Verses (winner of the Booker Prize)
  82. Geoff Ryman, Was
  83. Rafik Schami, Damascus Nights
  84. Han Shaogong, Dictionary of Maqiao
  85. Steven Sherrill, The Minotaur Takes a Cigarette Break
  86. Will Shetterly, Dogland
  87. Leslie Marmon Silko, Almanac of the Dead
  88. Carol Ann Sima, The Mermaid Who Came Between Them
  89. Johanna Sinsalo, Troll, A Love Story (winner of the Tiptree Award)
  90. Nancy Springer, The Blind God is Watching
  91. Sean Stewart, Mockingbird
  92. Amy Tan, The Hundred Secret Senses
  93. Amos Tutuola, The Palmwine Drinkard and My Life in the Bush of Ghosts
  94. Jane Urqhart, Away
  95. Luis Alberto Urrea, The Hummingbird's Daughter
  96. Catherynne M. Valenta, Yume No Hon: The Book of Dreams
  97. Alfredo Vea Jr., La Marravilla
  98. Jeanette Winterson, Sexing the Cherry
  99. Gao Xinghian, Soul Mountain
  100. Mia Yun, House of the Winds  

 

post #53 of 54

raksmama, thanks for sharing that list... the ones on it that i've read i have REALLY enjoyed, so if there's some kind of connection, i think i would enjoy them all...  :)

 

eta: oh my goodness... i fell into a hole with that online journal!  LOVE IT! luxlove.gif

post #54 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beanma View Post


I keep raiding the candy dish that is Outlander, but I just wanted to come back and say that I think they're liable to be very historically inaccurate based on my depth of knowledge about the areas in "Drums of Autumn" (the one set in NC). She's got so much geography and flora just wrong (cottonwood trees??) and while she got the bugs and heat right almost all the stuff about Cross Creek is just made up, but there is/was (name changed) real place called Cross Creek (called so because two creeks crossed not because a creek crossed the Cape Fear river). It's like she pulled a couple of place names out of the history books and then just made up the rest.


Okay, I wanted to come back to this and own up to blazing through all the rest of the "Outlander" series. I thought "The Fiery Cross" (the book following "Drums of Autumn") and the subsequent books rang much truer for me. I grew up in the actual Cross Creek area and have a direct Scottish ancestor (my gggggggg-grandfather) who emigrated to NC after the Jacobite rising and before the American revolution on my dad's side and on my mom's side folks were mountain people. So I really feel like I can spot inconsistencies in tone, etc. I'm wondering if she wrote DoA before even going to NC and then btwn the books went and visited because the later books are much more on target for me. I still think it's all candy, but I couldn't stop myself and gorged on them all. 

 

I'm working on "The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest" now. Thanks for all the great suggestions on the next books, too!

 

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