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Horror movie suitable for pre-teen? - Page 2

post #21 of 26

Lisa,

I certainly appreciate your input regarding your husband's experiences with horror movies. And yet, time and again, research bears out a different conclusion. Violence in movies and/or video games does indeed desensitize one to real life violence or emergency/helping situations. Here is but one such recent study:

 

http://sitemaker.umich.edu/brad.bushman/files/ba09.pdf

 

So, pet peeve of yours or not, I stand by my statement and the research that bears it out. Again I am left thinking I am the oddball out here. But, as I stated, I have never made choices based upon the popular or easy route and I choose to parent for the development of the whole child.

 

Kirsten - mom to Keiha, Kyran and Kirsey and momcologist to Rhema

post #22 of 26

Momcologist, you're not alone in your concerns.  I haven't delved into any research, but my common sense tells me that a steady diet of gore, etc. probably isn't great.  My dd's friends are really, really into this, esp. this time of year.  But, as I mentioned upthread, it gets to be too much for some kids, mine included.  I guess it depends on your child. 

post #23 of 26

I'm not going to get into whether I agree with the media violence link to real life violence, but I want to point out it's not simple.  My DH and I were once on very opposite sides of the fence, I originally came from a ECE and Waldorf early childhood perspective, and DH was once a computer engineer and video game beta tester (he's a nurse, now) so very opposite!  What we both found researching this matter, was that it's hard to sort out variables.  Parents who don't provide rules and structure with television viewing may provide less general structure, too, which is also a risk factor in violent behavior.  People who are already predisposed to violence may prefer violent programming.  The TV itself may lead to some children spending less social time, regardless of content.  OTOH, the risk in a growing brain may be greater.  And whether we now have increased violence now in a day and age of increased video violence is even disputable, violent crime has actually gone down in much of North America, and there are differences in the rates of reporting violent crime that could skew crime statistics, too. It goes on and on, with studies both for and against, and it's not simple.  Both DH and I fall more in the middle, now, especially now that our two older children are preteens and we've experienced seeing them grow into their own people as the outside world is increasingly more a part of their lives.  Here is a link from a media awareness website, with some statements from both points of view:

http://www.media-awareness.ca/english/issues/violence/effects_media_violence.cfm

 

Also, I think it's worth being aware that the news can be one of the worse sources of media violence out there.  It is obviously not fake, and violence is over reported compared to positive news.  It can give the impression that the world is way more dangerous than it is, and fear can breed aggression as much as desensitization.  And, whether an adult watches the movie with the child may make a difference, as they can explain and contextualize what the children are seeing.  I think it's a good habit to be aware of what your children watch even if the material is supposed to be child friendly.

 

On a practical note, the TV program "Dr Who" was originally meant to be a preteen friendly horror/Sci-fi series, and there isn't anything obviously gory or bloody, although there is death and fear.  This is the middle ground we've used with our own kids, I think it's still a step up from the really gross horror movies, but they still find it fun to watch with friends over.  Either DH or I or both of us usually sit down to watch with them (always if we haven't seen the episode yet, because we also have a 7 year old who definitely can't handle any visual violence) and eat popcorn.  Sometimes we have some pretty neat discussions, later, too.

 

 

post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by momcologist View Post

Lisa,

I certainly appreciate your input regarding your husband's experiences with horror movies. And yet, time and again, research bears out a different conclusion. Violence in movies and/or video games does indeed desensitize one to real life violence or emergency/helping situations. Here is but one such recent study:

 

http://sitemaker.umich.edu/brad.bushman/files/ba09.pdf

 

So, pet peeve of yours or not, I stand by my statement and the research that bears it out. Again I am left thinking I am the oddball out here. But, as I stated, I have never made choices based upon the popular or easy route and I choose to parent for the development of the whole child.

 

Kirsten - mom to Keiha, Kyran and Kirsey and momcologist to Rhema



Yes. I've seen study results like this before. I've never seen it play out like that in real life, though. (Twice, I've seen people requiring aid after leaving a violent movie - 80s action violence, not horror - and both times, people who were leaving the same movie rushed to assist.) So, I'm going to stick with what I've personally witnessed, over and over again, for almost 30 years, as opposed to conclusions reached in a study involving 20 minutes of videogame play and a staged fight.

 

I'm glad you've never made your choices based on the popular or easy way. You're obviously a parenting superstar. Making the popular and/or easy choice is all I ever do, of course. Otherwise, I'd have made the exact same decisions as you. (If that's not how you meant that to come across, you might want to rethink your wording. I have to assume you did mean it to sound snottily superior, though, as I can see no other reason to randomly interject - twice - that you don't choose to parent the easy or popular way.)

post #25 of 26

I don't know how easy it would be to get a copy of but I think "I saw what you did"  would be an ok one.

post #26 of 26

My boys liked Ghostbusters, Jaws, and The Lost Boys. The first two we watched last October, when they were in K and 2nd grade, and we watched The Lost Boys last week. I'm not a huge fan of horror movies but things that are more campy than scary are fun for Halloween. 

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