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Anyone find a nutritional yeast that does not contain synthetic vitamins?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hello, this is a follow up to the 2006 locked thread: http://www.mothering.com/community/t/545246/anyone-find-a-nutritional-yeast-that-does-not-have-synthetic-additives

 

Has anyone found such a yeast? Frontier makes an organic yeast, but it seems to contain wheat/gluten as well. Most nutritional yeasts I looked at seem to have the synthetic vitamins added. Eat Fat, Lose Fat specifically suggested the Frontier brand for lower risk of it containing MSG.

 

I ordered a bag of the large flake from Amazon, but then when I looked at the bag I saw the added synthetic vitamins, which was exactly what I was trying to avoid taking by purchasing this product. And Amazon won't accept returns on food products so now I'm stuck with it.

post #2 of 14

I harvested wild yeast just last week. I picked some grapes and put them in wet solution of fresh milled rye (I buy organic grains and have a hand crank mill). About a day and a half later I picked out the grapes and used most of the yeast and rye mixture to make bread but added more rye and water then put it in the fridge for later. I've never dried yeast for storage but I have kept in the freezer for a year and it's still good. Also, I wouldn't use store bought fruit as a source of yeast because who knows what it has been sprayed with. Typical backyard or wild fruit is best. And, rye has no gluten.

 

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hi Jett, thanks for the info. That sounds interesting and I may give it a try. I do have some grapes growing in the back yard. They're not wild, but they have not been sprayed with anything for many years. What's a good source for rye?

post #4 of 14

I bought a bucket from Pleasant Hill Grain - http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/buy_rye_purchase_bulk_rye_grain.aspx    ..

 

There are several sources of organtic rye grain to be found on the web and prices are similar. Many sell smaller amounts if you would prefer just a little to give a try. Amazon may be a good place to find a smaller package. You can also use a blender or coffee grinder to mill a small amount of flour but try not to let it get hot in the process.

 

Here's some info on harvesting wild yeast - http://www.ehow.com/how_5911370_harvest-yeast-breads.html. Fruit is not required but it's much faster to use a fruit source rather than wait for it to settle from open air. That powdery looking coating on grapes (plumbs and apples too) is actually wild yeast so it's a good source to get a large amount at once. Everywhere you see wheat flour referenced in harvest directions, just substitute rye flour and it will be just fine.

 

Hope it works for you - good luck!

 

 

post #5 of 14

Rye contains gluten!!!! Just in slightly lower amounts them wheat.

post #6 of 14

Oops, that's right, rye does have a little gluten in it but I think low levels compared to wheat. I always use rye but your yeast will still grow in a totally gluten free flour. Here's a good list of the various flours to choose from -http://www.wheat-free.org/wheat-free-flour.html .

 

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 

Wow thanks for the info! Is it possible to culture the yeast in molasses? I've seen some that say they are done that way.

 

Should the grains be sprouted before turning into flour? I was reading that helps get rid of some of the phytic acid that way?

post #8 of 14

I haven't grown yeast in anything but bread flour but I think it will grow in any solution that has some sugar available so I expect it will grow fine a a molasses solution. Drop some grapes in and see if you have bubbles the next day. Then stir and check again in a few hours and if it's working you'll have lots of bubbles. Use a glass jar or something you can see thru and you'll see a lot of activity if it's working.

 

For bread I soak the fresh flour in an acidic solution at room temperature for about 24 hrs to minimize phytic acid. About a table spoon of apple cider vinegar to each cup of flour and enough water to make it a little soupy then cover with a dish towel and let set until the next day. Then add enough fresh flour to get the right consistancy and follow the recipe from there. I've read sprouting works too but then you have to get the sprouts really dry to mill into flour. Don't know if the extra time it takes is worth it or not but I may give it a try one day.

 

Some grains have very little phytase enzymes so you need to add something with phytase if soaking to reduce phytic acid. When I soak oats I add some fresh milled rye because oats have almost no phytase and rye has a lot. I don't know about the other grains that are gluten free but they may not have enough phytase to reduce phytic acid with out some help so sprouting may be the best method for them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

Great thanks for the info. I think I will try culturing the yeast using some grapes from the back yard in molasses to see what happens. I think I will have to find a molasses that contains no added sulphites or preservatives to try it.

 

I haven't quite gotten into grains yet. I'm thinking I will want to add properly prepared grains to my diet eventually.

post #10 of 14

Um. Excuse my ignorance, but are you all also using what you harvest to - for example - sprinkle it on popcorn? If so, how do you do it - dry it on a baking sheet? Thanks.

post #11 of 14

I know this is old but I just came across Energen Brewer's Yeast Flakes.  No added anything.  It is brewer's yeast, not nutritional yeast, but it is inactive and sold as a supplement.  I am considering getting it, trying to find more info on it though.  Anyone have any thoughts?  Here it is http://www.azurestandard.com/shop/product/2926/

post #12 of 14

This looks similar to the above Energen brand:

 

http://lewis-labs.com/products/facts/brewers-yeast-facts.htm

 

It's what I buy, mainly because the flavor is very good. We put it on popcorn all the time.

post #13 of 14

I have KAL brnd Nutritional Yeast flakes. There is nothing artificial and is cultured on molasses. It's also gluten free.

post #14 of 14

I looked at this on vitacost and it has synthetic vitamins added

Quote:
Originally Posted by tygrss View Post

I have KAL brnd Nutritional Yeast flakes. There is nothing artificial and is cultured on molasses. It's also gluten free.

 

 

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