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Xpost: spa party ideas???

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

 

DD is turning 9 and wants a "spa" party.  I have some ideas but want more.  It will be about 5 or 6 guests and then my own three girls.  Any ideas?

 

I am cross-posting this in the childhood years.

 

Thanks

 

Amy

post #2 of 10

 

How many "spa" activities depends on whether the party is a few hours or a sleepover. I find I can manage a facial and a mani/pedi for about a half-dozen guests, but it's easier if we can extend it over a full evening with a sleepover. 

 

The mani/pedi can be done first, and they can enjoy a movie while the polish dries. We made up loot bags for pedicures with the flip-flops and toe separators in different colours along with personal emery boards and cuticle sticks (for hygiene) and let the girls pick their polish from a small selection that I purchased for the occasion. 

 

We've done homemade facials, using on-line recipes for masks with oatmeal, avocado or yoghurt with honey, almond oil etc (can't recall all the ingredients now, sorry!) and cucumber slices on the eyes. I made up the mask "goop" earlier in the day, put them in re-usable containers and let them each choose one to try. 

 

A spa theme is nice because the food tends to be healthier than typical party food - lots of fruit, veggies, sparkling water and juice smoothies. 

 

Enjoy and best wishes for the birthday girl. 

 

 

post #3 of 10

I guess it depends on how you feel about makeup, etc. but there can be ideas there.  They could also put hair wraps in each others' hair....http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/family/girls-hair-wraps.htm

 

Have fun!

post #4 of 10

Of course you know your guests best, but you might want to plan some alternative activities if there are families who do not feel that "spa day" is appropriate for 8 and 9 year olds.  We're that type of family.  We concentrate on the inside and let nature take care of the outside.  Dd had a friend who did a "spa day" party and dd didn't go.    I'm not looking to argue philosophy, but I'm just gently suggesting that there may be some invitees that don't come because their family has a crunchy back-to-the-earth or culturally different family philosophy.  That can be true for a variety of birthday activities, of course, not just "spa day".

post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post

 

How many "spa" activities depends on whether the party is a few hours or a sleepover. I find I can manage a facial and a mani/pedi for about a half-dozen guests, but it's easier if we can extend it over a full evening with a sleepover. 

 

The mani/pedi can be done first, and they can enjoy a movie while the polish dries. We made up loot bags for pedicures with the flip-flops and toe separators in different colours along with personal emery boards and cuticle sticks (for hygiene) and let the girls pick their polish from a small selection that I purchased for the occasion. 

 

We've done homemade facials, using on-line recipes for masks with oatmeal, avocado or yoghurt with honey, almond oil etc (can't recall all the ingredients now, sorry!) and cucumber slices on the eyes. I made up the mask "goop" earlier in the day, put them in re-usable containers and let them each choose one to try. 

 

A spa theme is nice because the food tends to be healthier than typical party food - lots of fruit, veggies, sparkling water and juice smoothies. 

 

Enjoy and best wishes for the birthday girl. 

 

 


What great ideas, I'm marking this down for sure!
If you do have the sleepover, maybe doing a yoga class would be good to fit into the spa theme. I would do that first and then a snack like the smoothies and move on to the other stuff.
Hope your party goes great!
post #6 of 10

 

Okay, I've seriously tried to figure out what could be objectionable about a spa day party. Basically, the idea of a spa is to cleanse and care for your body for hygiene and health. A manicure and pedicure is mostly essential nail care hygiene - careful trimming and filing. Yes, using polish is a frivolous little extra, but you can opt for clear (which is what I wear mostly, although I admit right now my toes are a bright red and frankly, I think they look fantastic) or none at all. A facial is just some extra deep face cleaning. Other spa activites like massage are pretty crunchy, health-related alternative, holistic medical modalities for musculoskeletal and circulatory function. I'd rather get a good massage than pop a bunch of anti-inflammatories and pain killers when I have aching muscles or a sore back. 

 

Isn't learning good hygiene and to take care of your body a pretty good lesson for a pre-teen? Is it the fact that it's fun that makes it suspicious? That it's about taking care of one's self, rather than others? There's a relaxation component to it, but in a stress-filled world, that's got to be a good thing. I'm completely puzzled. 

 

 

post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post

 

Okay, I've seriously tried to figure out what could be objectionable about a spa day party. Basically, the idea of a spa is to cleanse and care for your body for hygiene and health. A manicure and pedicure is mostly essential nail care hygiene - careful trimming and filing. Yes, using polish is a frivolous little extra, but you can opt for clear (which is what I wear mostly, although I admit right now my toes are a bright red and frankly, I think they look fantastic) or none at all. A facial is just some extra deep face cleaning. Other spa activites like massage are pretty crunchy, health-related alternative, holistic medical modalities for musculoskeletal and circulatory function. I'd rather get a good massage than pop a bunch of anti-inflammatories and pain killers when I have aching muscles or a sore back. 

 

Isn't learning good hygiene and to take care of your body a pretty good lesson for a pre-teen? Is it the fact that it's fun that makes it suspicious? That it's about taking care of one's self, rather than others? There's a relaxation component to it, but in a stress-filled world, that's got to be a good thing. I'm completely puzzled. 

 

 

 

You don't have to go to a spa to learn good hygiene or to have healthy nails. Quite the opposite, actually.  And I doubt that little girls are getting a massage, so that argument holds no water.  We feel that this teaches them that being pretty on the outside is more important than what is on the inside, when we are more interested in teaching that character is more important than looks.   It works for our family.  I'm not here to argue the point, just to say that not everyone agrees with it.

 

Here's a New York Times article discussing how cosmetic companies are grooming our young girls to become hyper-consumers of beauty products by getting them into the "spa" mindset.  What you don't find objectionable, I do.  To each their own.  (Plus, we don't feel that these products are actually healthy, especially nail polish, which often contains formaldehyde.  That's a biased link, but you can google for more unbiased info)  I don't object to spas... I object to them for impressionable young girls who are trying to develop their own sense of self-worth.  Each family does what works for them.
 

 


Edited by velochic - 9/12/11 at 8:55am
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post

Of course you know your guests best, but you might want to plan some alternative activities if there are families who do not feel that "spa day" is appropriate for 8 and 9 year olds.  We're that type of family.  We concentrate on the inside and let nature take care of the outside.  Dd had a friend who did a "spa day" party and dd didn't go.    I'm not looking to argue philosophy, but I'm just gently suggesting that there may be some invitees that don't come because their family has a crunchy back-to-the-earth or culturally different family philosophy.  That can be true for a variety of birthday activities, of course, not just "spa day".



I am the crunchiest one in our circle.  However, "spa day" for us isn't about making yourself more beautiful, sexy, or whatnot at our house.  It is just about pampering and taking care of our bodies.  My girls love to play "spa" and they take turns giving each other foot rubs and back massages.  They like to turn on "relaxing" music and use lightly scented lotions.  My kids have sensitive skin so our lotion selection is usually something from CA baby or other closer to nature company.  Their own imaginative play is what gave the idea to a spa day party.  So, from our point of view, it is hard to see how this would be inappropriate for 8/9 year olds.  I do value your opinion though, it has given me things to think about.  

 

 

Amy

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the ideas!  We haven't decided whether or not the party is going to be a sleepover, but I love the idea of including yoga.  

 

Thanks again.

 

Amy

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post



 

You don't have to go to a spa to learn good hygiene or to have healthy nails. Quite the opposite, actually.  And I doubt that little girls are getting a massage, so that argument holds no water.  We feel that this teaches them that being pretty on the outside is more important than what is on the inside, when we are more interested in teaching that character is more important than looks.   It works for our family.  I'm not here to argue the point, just to say that not everyone agrees with it.

 

Here's a New York Times article discussing how cosmetic companies are grooming our young girls to become hyper-consumers of beauty products by getting them into the "spa" mindset.  What you don't find objectionable, I do.  To each their own.  (Plus, we don't feel that these products are actually healthy, especially nail polish, which often contains formaldehyde.  That's a biased link, but you can google for more unbiased info)  I don't object to spas... I object to them for impressionable young girls who are trying to develop their own sense of self-worth.  Each family does what works for them.
 

 


You've raised a few interesting issues. 

 

I did mention foregoing the nail polish, LOL. You can have a manicure and pedicure without it, and use natural products like almond oil to treat the cuticles and beeswax lotion for hand and foot cream.   

 

You're right, one doesn't have to go to a spa to learn good hygiene or personal care. Just like one doesn't have to go to a fine restaurant to learn about good food. Both can be an enjoyable experience though. Even fairly young children can enjoy a nice restaurant meal, and likewise, enjoy a little pampering and personal care. 

 

Many, including that article's author, conflate spas with beauty salons. It's easily done, especially by those who aren't familiar with the traditional health spa. Since the OP mentioned a spa day, I believed her focus was on the personal care and holistic health aspects of a spa, rather than cosmetics and make-overs and expensive beauty products, which seems to be the focus of that article. 

 

Tone and attitude matter a lot when planning a party. It could be a horrific Toddlers-in-Tiaras kind of event, but so could a dress-up costume party. The article raises valid concerns about consumerism. I don't forego an activity just because evil corporations try to make a buck, but I do try to choose wisely and spend carefully. For example, even though there are huge liquor companies, I still enjoy an occasional drink, but we tend to buy from craft breweries, local small vinyards and artisanal producers. That's why facials using home-made ingredients, rather than off-the-shelf products are great for these parties. Learning that a mixture of oatmeal and yoghurt is just as effective as a paste packaged up in an expensive jar is a pretty good early lesson in anti-consumerism, and more effective than an outright ban. At least, it has been with DD. 

 

I think it's possible for someone who is attractive to also have a good character. I don't think it's an either/or thing. I've taught my kids that we care for our minds, our bodies and our spirits equally. We nurture, develop and enjoy all three. There's no guilt or shame that it's somehow wrong to take care of our appearance. They don't judge a person's moral value or intelligence based on physical appearance, but they don't think personal decoration and aesthetics are evil or unworthy either.  I can see that it could be easier to avoid the whole issue entirely, rather than try to walk a fine line through the minefield of personal care and cosmetics and physical appearance, so I think I understand your position.

 

Oh, and a foot and hand massage as part of the manicure and pedicure are pretty nice and absolutely a normal, almost expected, part of the procedure. It's derived from traditional health spas, where massage of the extremities would be a routine treatment. 

 

 

 

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