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October Book Challenge - Page 2

post #21 of 80
Thread Starter 

A Year Without Autumn by Liz Kessler

 

My daughters (and students) are big fans of Kessler's Emily Windsnap series so I was excited to check out her newest offering . . . I must admit that at first I was not exactly enamored of the story or the characters. 12 year old Jenni came off as wimpy and annoying; her best friend Autumn bossy and even a little mean. But then I got to the time travel part and things started getting good. By the last chapter, I was on the edge of my seat, heart pounding, to find out what was going to happen. I'd like to say more, but don't want to spoil the suspense for potential readers. I will just add that I really liked this book and recommend it to 4th - 6th grade girls.

post #22 of 80

October

127. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling
128. The Blackhope Enigma by Teresa Flavin
129.  The Familiars by Adam Jay Epstein and Andrew Jacobson
130.  The Italian Secretary by Caleb Carr

post #23 of 80

Damascus Nights by Rafik Schami

 http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/507036.Damascus_Nights

 

Although I did not love it so much that I started dreading it being over when I got to be halfway though (for me that is a sign that I really love a novel!), I still really enjoyed this book and would highly recommend it!    Below is the goodreads review:

<It is 1959, Damascus. The most famous storyteller in Damascus, Salim, the coachman, has mysteriously lost his voice. For seven nights, his seven old friends gather to break the spell with their seven different, unique stories -- some personal, some modern, some borrowed from the past. Against the backdrop of shifting Middle Eastern politics, Schami's eight characters, lost to the Arabian nights, weave in and out of tales of wizards and princesses, of New York skyscrapers and America. With spellbinding power, Schami imparts a luscious vision of storytelling as food for thought and salve for the soul, as the glue which holds our lives together>


Edited by raksmama - 10/18/11 at 11:46am
post #24 of 80
Hello. Can I join in?

The Book of Night Women by Marlon James. Heartbreaking story of slavery in Jamaica. Beautifully written. I can't put it down.
post #25 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post

A Year Without Autumn by Liz Kessler

 

My daughters (and students) are big fans of Kessler's Emily Windsnap series so I was excited to check out her newest offering . . . I must admit that at first I was not exactly enamored of the story or the characters. 12 year old Jenni came off as wimpy and annoying; her best friend Autumn bossy and even a little mean. But then I got to the time travel part and things started getting good. By the last chapter, I was on the edge of my seat, heart pounding, to find out what was going to happen. I'd like to say more, but don't want to spoil the suspense for potential readers. I will just add that I really liked this book and recommend it to 4th - 6th grade girls.


Oh, that does sound good!  Thanks for all your YA recommendations Cathe.  My daughter is 7 now, and I have a feeling I'll be consistently searching for good books for her soon :)  We're reading the Penderwicks together right now, and halfway through the Little House books.  After that, we're going to start on the Wrinkle in Time series.  And she's devouring the older American Girl books.  Voracious reading!

 

 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by *bejeweled* View Post

Hello. Can I join in?
The Book of Night Women by Marlon James. Heartbreaking story of slavery in Jamaica. Beautifully written. I can't put it down.


Of course!  Welcome! :)

 

 

 

I am now in 3 book clubs!  hammer.gif  One at work, one with the moms at my daughter's school, and one with my college girlfriends.  Only slightly hectic :)  Just finished Black Elk in Paris for one club, and am now reading an Anita Diamant book, The Bluest Eye, and A Reliable Wife for the clubs.  Keeping me busy!

 

post #26 of 80

Finished Crank by Ellen Hopkins

 

A "loosely based" true story about the author's daughter's battle with crank (aka methamphetamines).  The story follows 16 year old Kristine's quick descent into the destructive hole of meth addiction.  This is the first book in the trilogy (Glass & Fallout are the other two books) about this young girl's battle.

 

Powerful, beautifully written book.  Ellen Hopkins is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors.    

 

 

post #27 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post

Wonder Struck by Brian Selznick

 

 

Two stories intertwine -- one in words takes place in 1977 about Ben a boy who has just lost his mother and his hearing who runs away to New York to find his father, and one in pictures  that takes place in 1927 about a young deaf girl running away to New York City to be with her movie star mother. Eventually the stories intertwine . . . in a heartwrenchingly wonderful way.
 
I absolutely LOVED this book. In fact, when I'm done writing this review I want to go back and read it again. It was so beautiful, so touching. I was actually tearing up at the end. I think in a way it's a shame this is categorized as a children's book because it has so much for adults as well.

 

I was just invited to a special event with him to celebrate his new book.  Should probably start reading his new book asap, as the event is on Oct. 26!  Happy to hear it is such a good one.   
 

 

post #28 of 80

54) Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh. This was a a book I found courtesy of this group. I really enjoyed this book. I love flowers and I really enjoyed the character development. I work with kids like Victoria, so some of the positive outcomes were hard to swallow because youth aging out of foster care really have some very tough challenges ahead of them. BUt I embraced the characters and the story and in my heart, I hoped there were more people like Victoria.

 

Wonder Struck sounds great! On my list for future reads!

post #29 of 80

The Stolen Child by Keith Donohue

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38657.The_Stolen_Child

Once I got past the first few chapters which were rather depressing, I could not put this novel down.  The story drew me in so much that after I finished I even re-read the some of the chapters.  Donohue has very unusual take on faeries, not quite like anything I’ve read before. If you are expecting your usual Faerie novel, you’ll be in for a surprise! Beside the changelings this novel is very rooted in reality and more of a coming of age story. I look forward to reading more books by Keith Donohue!

post #30 of 80

I haven't been doing a good job of keeping track of what number of books I am on.  Here are my latest books anyway biggrinbounce.gif

 

 

The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz

Really fun story about a family in San Francisco with two grown children and one teenage daughter.  They are all private investigators, except the oldest brother.  The tone of the book is funny and irreverent.  Enjoyable.

 

The Lacemakers of Glenmara by Heather Barbieri

I liked this, sort of a romantic story of a young woman from Seattle.  She travels to Ireland and ends up settling in a coastal town and learning about their traditional lacemaking. 

 

Room by Emma Donoghue

So many of us have read this.  Probably don't need to summarize.  Really kind of an amazing story.  I'm glad I read it.  My heart beat faster at times when reading it, and I cried with joy. 

post #31 of 80

55) The Geeks Shall Inherit The Earth by Alexandra Robbins. Such a great book! Please read if you have kids, work with kids or are a close support to other kids. This book discusses the social interactions and social groups that develop in middle school and high school. She does a nice job presenting the perspective of individual youth and she challenges them to step outside of the cliques that they are in. 

 

http://www.npr.org/2011/05/22/136498042/quirk-cachet-why-geeks-shall-inherit-the-earth

post #32 of 80

Starting over for 2011, and pretending the previous nine months did not happen.

 

1. A History of Horror (Kindle Edition)

by Winston Wheeler Dixon

 

Reviewed HERE, but the short of it is: not worth owning, but possibly worth reading ... depending on how much of a horror geek you are.

 

 

1. A History of Horror (Kindle Edition),


Edited by NewCrunchyDaddy - 10/18/11 at 3:06pm
post #33 of 80

 

January

1. Only Son - Kevin O'Brien

2. Planning To Live - Heather Wardell

3. The 7 Wonders That Will Change Your Life - Glenn Beck/ Keith Ablow

4. Life, Love and a Polar Bear Tatoo - Heather Wardell

5. Carved In Bone - Jefferson Bass

February

6. Thirteen Reasons Why- Jay Asher

7. The Abstinence Teacher- Tom Perrotta

8. One Fine Day Your're Gonna Die- Gail Bowen (90 pgs)

9. Term Limits - Vince Flynn

10. Scars - Cheryl Rainfield

March

11. After- Amy Efaw

12. Hold Still- Nina LaCour

13. Pretty Little Things-Jilliane Hoffman

14. Happen Every Day- Isabel Gilles

15. School Days- Robert B. Parker

April

16. I Am Emotional Creature: The Secret Life of Girls Around the World - Eve Ensler

17. Plea of Insanity- Jilliane Hoffman

18. Unsweetined- Jodie Sweetin

19. The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants- Ann Brashares

20. The Second Summer of the Sisterhood - Ann Brashares

May

21. Vicious- Kevin O'Brien

22. Listen- Rene Gutteridge

23. No Time Left- David Baldacci

24. Throwaway- Heather Huffman

25. Plan B- Joseph Finder

June

26. Saving Rachel- John Locke

27.Buried Secrets- Joseph Finder 

28.Vanished- Joseph Finder

29. The Abbey- Chris Culver

30. Life's A Beach- Claire Cook

July

31. Brenin- M.B. Forester-Smythe

32. Now You See Her- James Patterson

33. The Reading Promise- Alice Ozma

34. Mockingbird- Kathryn Erskine

35. Al Capone Does My Shirts- Gennifer Choldenko

August

36. The Confession- John Grisham

September

37. Mystery- Jonathan Kellerman

38. Touch- Francine Prose

39. Go Ask Alice- Anonymous

40. Transition: The Story of How I Became A Man- Chaz Bono

October

41. Just Take My Heart- Mary Higgins Clark

42. One Summer- David Baldacci

43. The Accident- Linwood Barclay

44.

45.

post #34 of 80


I ordered 'The Room' and 'The Spellman Files' from the library.  Thanks for the suggestions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post

I haven't been doing a good job of keeping track of what number of books I am on.  Here are my latest books anyway biggrinbounce.gif

 

 

The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz

Really fun story about a family in San Francisco with two grown children and one teenage daughter.  They are all private investigators, except the oldest brother.  The tone of the book is funny and irreverent.  Enjoyable.

 

The Lacemakers of Glenmara by Heather Barbieri

I liked this, sort of a romantic story of a young woman from Seattle.  She travels to Ireland and ends up settling in a coastal town and learning about their traditional lacemaking. 

 

Room by Emma Donoghue

So many of us have read this.  Probably don't need to summarize.  Really kind of an amazing story.  I'm glad I read it.  My heart beat faster at times when reading it, and I cried with joy. 



 

post #35 of 80

Unwind by Neil Shusterman

 

Quote:
The Second Civil War was fought over reproductive rights. The chilling resolution: Life is inviolable from the moment of conception until age thirteen. Between the ages of thirteen and eighteen, however, parents can have their child "unwound," whereby all of the child's organs are transplanted into different donors, so life doesn't technically end. Connor is too difficult for his parents to control. Risa, a ward of the state is not enough to be kept alive. And Lev is a tithe, a child conceived and raised to be unwound. Together, they may have a chance to escape and to survive.

 

This book had me riveted through its entirety.  I struggled putting it down to even use the bathroom.  The characters are strong and very well developed.  The story is constantly moving and shifting with a great ending. 

post #36 of 80

 Zadayi Red by Caleb Fox

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6267766-zadayi-red

Zadayi Red is a retelling of an ancient Cherokee legend that goes back before the Europeans arrived. Caleb Fox who is part Cherokee, did a lot of historical research to try to keep the details of the Cherokee life in that period as authentic as possible (for example bows and arrows were not used until around 800 B.C. before the story takes place.) At the same time it is a fantasy and has the same format as a high Fantasy  novel, for example there is a prophesy, a  young warrior with a quest, a good shaman and medicine woman who help him and a very evil character.  Fox has a very enjoyable style of writing. I love when myths and legends are incorporated into literature, but I am not a fan of High Fantasy, so for this reason alone, I did not enjoy the novel as much as I hoped to.

However  If you are interested in First Nations or Native American Mythology and like High Fantasy as well, I still highly recommend this book.


Edited by raksmama - 10/18/11 at 11:52am
post #37 of 80

I have NO idea why the print came out green?????

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by raksmama View Post

Zadayi Red by Caleb Fox

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6267766-zadayi-red

Zadayi Red is a retelling of an ancient Cherokee legend that goes back before the Europeans arrived. Caleb Fox who is part Cherokee, did a lot of historical research to try and keep the details of the Cherokee life in that period as authentic as possible (for example bows and arrows were not used until around 800 B.C., before the story takes place.) At the same time it is a fantasy novel and has the same format as a high Fantasy story, for example there is a prophesy, a  young warrior with a quest, a good shaman and medicine woman who help him and a very evil character.  Fox has a very good enjoyable style of writing. I love when myths and legends are incorporated into literature and but I am not a fan of High Fantasy, so for this reason alone, I did not enjoy the novel as much as I hoped to.

  If you are interested in First Nations or Native American Mythology and like High Fantasy I still highly recommend this book.



 

post #38 of 80

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

Fantastic story for high school age and above dealing w/ life on an Indian Reservation

True (...sort of) by Katherine Hannigan

Sad, but wonderfully written story about an 11 year old girl dealing with her emotions and a friend who is being abused.

Ida B: . . . and Her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster, and (Possibly) Save the World by Katherine Hannigan

Totally amazing story about a 9 year old girl who has been homeschooled and must go to public school when her mother gets cancer.

Deals w/ her emotions in a really well written story.

post #39 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by christianmomof3 View Post

 

True (...sort of) by Katherine Hannigan

Sad, but wonderfully written story about an 11 year old girl dealing with her emotions and a friend who is being abused.

Ida B: . . . and Her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster, and (Possibly) Save the World by Katherine Hannigan

Totally amazing story about a 9 year old girl who has been homeschooled and must go to public school when her mother gets cancer.

Deals w/ her emotions in a really well written story.


Ordered both of these....   stealing books from you ladies this month... thanks

 

post #40 of 80

2. Mile 81 (Kindle Edition)

by Stephen King

 

Reviewed HERE, but the short of it is: not worth my or your time, money or effort.

 

 

1. A History of Horror (Kindle Edition), 2. Mile 81 (Kindle Edition),


Edited by NewCrunchyDaddy - 10/18/11 at 3:04pm
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