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October Book Challenge - Page 4

post #61 of 80


 

Quote:

Originally Posted by christianmomof3 View Post

I tried to read this book - it is for adults, not kids -

Blindness by Jose Saramago

but could not get through it.  The grammar was purposely dreadful - I have no idea why, but it was way too annoying and difficult to read and a lot of it was rather disgusting and disturbing.  It won the Nobel Prize for literature, but I have no idea why. 

 

And I finished reading this memoir about racial integration and the civil rights movement in the US

The Grace of Silence: A Family Memoir by Michele Norris

 


i felt exactly the same about the Saramago book.  i remember a friend raving about how good it was, and i was just baffled.

 

thanks for the reminder about The Grace of Silence. I saw that in a bookstore and thought it looked interesting. did you enjoy it?

 

& another thumbs up for Stargirl.  i am crazy about Jerry Spinelli: Maniac Magee, Smiles to Go

 

post #62 of 80
Thread Starter 

The Absolute Value of Mike by Kathy Erskine

 

Another good middle grade pick from this author. This was very different, very funny. Good pick for boys.

post #63 of 80



thanks I am always on the look for good boys books!

Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post

The Absolute Value of Mike by Kathy Erskine

 

Another good middle grade pick from this author. This was very different, very funny. Good pick for boys.



 

post #64 of 80

Glass by Ellen Hopkins

 

The 2nd book in Ellen Hopkins' trilogy about Kristina Snow and her downward spiral into the world of meth addiction.  I like how the book picks up right where the first one left off.  The writing is, as always, beautiful and honest.  It is a very difficult and sad story to read, due to the subject matter, but her writing flows so smoothly you just can't stop reading.

post #65 of 80

I just finished reading

Beauty Queens by Libba Bray

and it was hilarious!  The whole thing is a spoof and I just loved it.  It is for high school age kids I think, but I am not sure if they will catch all of the humor.  I was laughing out loud when I read it quite a few times. 

post #66 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by kangamitroo View Post

 

thanks for the reminder about The Grace of Silence. I saw that in a bookstore and thought it looked interesting. did you enjoy it?

 



I enjoyed the historical parts of The Grace of Silence.  It had some very interesting facts that I had no idea about - like in Birmingham, black people could not use the library, so the families in one neighborhood all bought different books and catalogued whose house they were at and formed their own library lending system.  I found parts of it rather dry - the parts that were about her family just did not seem so interesting, but I liked how she researched about her father's having been shot.  My aunt told me that my grandfather once shot and killed a man who was robbing him at his pawn shop.  After reading this book I realize that I could look into the police records about it and learn more about that incident. 

 

 

 

post #67 of 80

56) "A Stolen Life" by Jaycee Dugard.

 

I read this very quickly. While not an easy read, she writes in a plain way that describes the events as they occurred, she reflects back on them and then pushing forward. There are certainly painful moments that made me cry and/or flinch (it is about child abduction in case folks do not know the story). SOmehow though Jaycee is able to more than pull through this trauma and focus on helping others. She sounds like a remarkable woman.

 


Edited by Igraine - 10/26/11 at 4:14pm
post #68 of 80

Raven by Allison Van Diepen

  I bought this this YA novel by chance. When I went to a book signing by one of my favourite all time authors Charles de Lint, and Allison Van Diepen was there with him promoting her new book Raven. I felt bad for her because it seemed like everyone was there for Charles De Lint, so I bought her book. Good thing I did, because I ended enjoying it immensely!  It is very original and ends up differently than you might guess. I like the fact that the main character’s love interest was Arab, but it was not because there were terrorists in the story, or because it was a story about Immigrants or any other clichés. The character could have been from any ethic background. My only criticism is since the characters are all break dancers there are a lot of break dance terms that I was unfamiliar with. I would have appreciated an explanation

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3919080-raven

<Zin dances with fire in every step; speaks with a honey sweet voice; and sees with eyes that can peer into your soul. Nicole's friendship with him is the only thing that saves her from the boredom of school and the turmoil of her family life. It's no wonder why Nicole is madly in love with him. But she can't understand why he keeps her at a distance, even though she can feel his soul reaching out for hers. Zin is like no man Nicole has ever met, and he carries with him a very old secret. When Nicole uncovers the truth, her love may be the only thing that can save him from it.>

post #69 of 80

Green print again! Does anyone know why this keeps happening?

post #70 of 80
Thread Starter 

Why We Broke Up by Daniel Handler

 

This is by the author of the Series of Unfortunate Events but it couldn't be more different!

 

Min and Ed are an unlikely pair. She is an old-movie geek, he is a popular, ladies-man jock. Against the advice of friends and family, they begin to get serious. Obviously something went wrong as the entire book is a letter from Min to Ed (accompanying a box of souvenirs) explaining "why we broke up."

I just loved this book . . . it actually reminded me just a bit of Jay Asher's Thirteen Reasons Why for two reasons: 1) It totally brought high school back for me; and 2) The similar format of already knowing the end result but finding out why and how it happened. Of course, this is not as heavy as this book--no suicide is involved, but I think fans of that one will like this one as well. I loved the characters and was really rooting for them . . . and was very sad that they broke up. 
 

post #71 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post

Why We Broke Up by Daniel Handler

 

This is by the author of the Series of Unfortunate Events but it couldn't be more different!


 

Wait ... I thought Lemony Snicket was the author of the Series of Unfortunate Events.  Y-you mean that he's not?  You mean that he is just a literary construct by which an author can create a voice in which to write that he or she would not normally have access to and be able to speak with authority on a series of events that did not occur?   But but but ... bawling.gif

post #72 of 80
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post


 

Wait ... I thought Lemony Snicket was the author of the Series of Unfortunate Events.  Y-you mean that he's not?  You mean that he is just a literary construct by which an author can create a voice in which to write that he or she would not normally have access to and be able to speak with authority on a series of events that did not occur?   But but but ... bawling.gif



Oh, NCD . . . sorry to shatter your image of Lemony Snicket, but yes Daniel Handler is actually him . . . 

 

(I feel like I just told my daughter there's no Santa Claus . . . don't know if I can take the guilt of this)

 

I guess I should have put SPOILER on that post!

post #73 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post


 



Oh, NCD . . . sorry to shatter your image of Lemony Snicket, but yes Daniel Handler is actually him . . . 

 

(I feel like I just told my daughter there's no Santa Claus . . . don't know if I can take the guilt of this)

 

I guess I should have put SPOILER on that post!



ROTFLMAO.gif

post #74 of 80

Made for Goodness: Why this makes all the difference by Desmond Tutu & Mpho Tutu

 

I really enjoyed this book.  I found it full of encouragement and beautiful stories. Desmond Tutu is so wise and articulate, as is his daughter (also an anglican priest). In preparing for my review, it seemed I was writing down everything as a possible quote for inclusion.

post #75 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by christianmomof3 View Post



I enjoyed the historical parts of The Grace of Silence.  It had some very interesting facts that I had no idea about - like in Birmingham, black people could not use the library, so the families in one neighborhood all bought different books and catalogued whose house they were at and formed their own library lending system.  I found parts of it rather dry - the parts that were about her family just did not seem so interesting, but I liked how she researched about her father's having been shot.  My aunt told me that my grandfather once shot and killed a man who was robbing him at his pawn shop.  After reading this book I realize that I could look into the police records about it and learn more about that incident. 

 

good luck with your research!  sounds like you might have a story of your own in the making. & thanks for the detailed feedback on the book.
 

 

post #76 of 80

Have we started a nov. thread yet?

post #77 of 80

Centuries of June, Donohue

 

 

 

Quote:

Set in the bathroom of an old house just before dawn on a night in June, Centuries of June is a black comedy about a man who is attempting to tell the story of how he ended up on the floor with a hole in his head. But he keeps getting interrupted by a series of suspects—eight women lying in the bedroom just down the hall. Each woman tells a story drawn from five centuries of American myth and legend in a wild medley of styles and voices.

Centuries of June is a romp through history, a madcap murder mystery, an existential ghost story, and a stunning tour de force at once ingenious, sexy, inspiring, and ultimately deeply moving.

 

 

Gosh, I didn't know what to make of this one at first.  I didn't find the beginning compelling -- I couldn't figure out what was going on -- but the writing was so gorgeous I kept reading.  So glad I did -- the layers of the story, and of Jack's life, peel away in such a lovely and interesting way.

 

 

 

After Tupac and D Foster, Woodson

Quote:
The day D Foster enters Neeka and her best friend's lives, the world opens up for them. Suddenly they're keenly aware of things beyond their block in Queens, things that are happening in the world - like the shooting of Tupac Shakur - and in search of their Big Purpose in life. When - all too soon - D's mom swoops in to reclaim her, and Tupac dies, they are left with a sense of how quickly things can change and how even all-too-brief connections can touch deeply.

 

 

Highly recommended YA book, about how even the people in our lives for a short time can touch us deeply.  IMO the author does a wonderful job speaking in the voice of a young woman growing up in the city, trying to find her way to a different reality.  Woodson makes you feel as though you are with the three girls as they move through adolescence, navigating their families and an outside community that is not always kind to African-American youth.

 

 

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Rowling   

post #78 of 80
Quote:

Originally Posted by kofduke View Post

 

After Tupac and D Foster, Woodson

 

Highly recommended YA book, about how even the people in our lives for a short time can touch us deeply.  IMO the author does a wonderful job speaking in the voice of a young woman growing up in the city, trying to find her way to a different reality.  Woodson makes you feel as though you are with the three girls as they move through adolescence, navigating their families and an outside community that is not always kind to African-American youth.


love this one! all of Jacqueline Woodson's books that I have read are simply excellent.

 

post #79 of 80

I started the November thread.  I just stole from Cathe's opening post.  Hope that is OK.  redface.gif

post #80 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holland73 View Post

I started the November thread.  I just stole from Cathe's opening post.  Hope that is OK.  redface.gif



Super awesome. :)   Thank you!!! 

 

I'm back to more reading after spending all my spare time the last 2 months planning the annual fall fundraiser for my daughter's school.  It's like planning a wedding for 100 guests, except no photographer, but you have to manage donations and a giant raffle with all the prizes.  Crazy, wicked, insanity and fun. :)

 

Off to finish Good Harbor by Anita Diamant and Charity Girl by I can't remember who. 

 

Do some of you remember when we a bunch of us read The Book of Lost of Things by John Connolly?  I see he has written some other books but I wasn't sure which one to pick.  Anyone have an opinion?  Also, if you've read American Gods by Neil Gaiman, which would you read next?

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