or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Preteens and Teens › My Very Overweight 11yo - At A Loss!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

My Very Overweight 11yo - At A Loss! - Page 2

post #21 of 42

When I was 11 I was 105 lbs (4'11) and wore a womans size 5.   I was certainly on the larger size but not considered overweight. i had gained 30 lbs that summer so I was covered in stretch marks. they did fade away over time

post #22 of 42

I want to reiterate what pp said about stretch marks. Some of us are just prone to them. I got terrible, terrible ones on my breasts in puberty. I get them if I gain or lose weight but they most definitely do fade & the ones I got when I was young especially you really cannot see anymore.

 

If you yourself are 5'9" there is a good likelihood your dd is going to be tall as well. How tall is she now? Does she have a lot of inches to grow potentially? I wouldn't dismiss your concerns but it can be pretty incredible how much some girls gain just before their big growth spurt & then slim right out.

 

A focus on physical activity for everyone in the family is a great idea. I agree with pp that size does NOT by any stretch of the imagination indicate physical fitness so focusing on strength, flexibility, endurance is a much better way to approach fitness for everyone.

 

Checking in with the doctor is certainly not a bad idea. But what about also talking to your daughter. I find it hard to believe that at 12 she has not noticed a difference in her body from the rest of the family's or her friends. You don't need to come at it as "I think you are overweight" but rather "how do you feel about your body".

post #23 of 42


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by April*autmaiajude* View Post

You are right - wearing a size 5 does not mean that you are overweight, if you are a teenager or an adult. She is not. She is girl, and prepubescent, which means that she has not begun to approach her adult height.

 

 

It's sounds like her breast are growing (hence the stretch marks). I looked around on line for some size charts because my assumption was that a person wearing a Junior 5 would be more curvy than a person wearing a girls 16, but I found that size charts are a bit all over the place and pretty meaningless. Wearing a size 5 doesn't even mean the same thing in different stores, or in different pants in the same store. 

 

I'm not totally buying that your DD is "prepubescent". She sounds "pubescent" to me. shrug.gif 


I am honestly wondering how you would suggest that that I cover up my sadness from her?

 

After reading your responses, I went back and reread your first post to see why I thought what I did because it seemed like I was really off on what was going on. The first paragraph of your first post is intense. Here's what you started with:

 

I am so sad and frustrated and heartbroken for her. I feel like a failure and a horrible parent.

 

I really don't believe you when you say that her weight isn't important to you. You wouldn't be heartbroken for her and feel like a failure as a parent if that were true.

 

Rather than hiding it from her, I suggest you find other ways to think about it to take the emotional sting out. Yes, you have cause for concern. Yes, there are actions you can take to help. None the less, changing the way you think about the situation can change the way you feel about the situation, and that I think would be helpful to your DD. In the scope of human problems, weight is pretty small issue. She's healthy, she's happy, she's loved. So yes, talk to your doctor and get some blood work done, help her find activities that she loves, review the kinds of foods your family eats. 
 

You can let your sadness go completely because it's an unhelpful emotion. You can take a different perspective of the situation and see it as an issue that needs some attention.  It sounds like you've let your sadness and shame stop you from doing thing that would be helpful for her, such as talking to the doctor, of even speaking honestly to her about the fact that it would be to find a sport/dance class/ something. If you let the sadness go away, you might find it easier to take the actions that might be helpful.  


 


 


 

 

post #24 of 42

I agree with you OP.  I dislike the "well, all bodies are beautiful no matter what the size".   Of course, that's true, but in reality, out in the real world, life tells us differently.  Especially at that age.

 

Women who have lost weight after being a heavy child, teen, or young adult will all say they feel like they wasted those years.   There is a reason that there are so many gimiky sayings out there "Nothing tastes as good as thin feels".  Or "Earn your Body".  It's because it's important to us.  At one time, I lost 30lbs.  It became the most important thin in my life!  It felt WONDERFUL.  I never wanted to gain that weight back.  Ever.  I loved the feeling of sitting on the floor with my knees up and, my stomach didn't get in the way.  I could tie my shoes without holding my breath.

 

As a Mom, I'd want everything for my daughter!  I'd want the best possible body, the best possible health...everything.  But, it's hard to figure out how to change something for one person in the family, when the others don't need the same changes.

 

I would learn weight watchers for yourself.  Make those changes for the whole family.  

 

http://www.amazon.com/Eat-Clean-Diet-Family-Kids-Strategies/dp/B004J8HW1Y/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1317912326&sr=8-1  Tosca Reno's books are very good.

 

We are all different.  I can't eat carbs without gaining tons of weight.  My body just doesn't process the carbs very well.  I obviously eat fruit, and some grains, like Oatmeal, but I don't eat anything with sugar or processed flour.  It's not because i'm all conscious of those things, it's just because I don't feel good when I eat it... but, it took me a long time to figure it out.

 

I also think that running and playing with friends outside is the best fitness any kid can have.  Walking home from school, playing outside, jumping on a trampoline, all those things that naturally make kids fit are awesome.  

 

I personally think Americans are overweight because of the last half of the 80s.  In the 80s it became obvious that our kids weren't safe playing outside...so, we started watching them closely, which meant they couldn't do all the things they were always doing.  It truly just wasn't safe.  Nothing can ever change that.  We can't even let our kids walk to school alone.   Then, Atari was born.  Then Kid's products started making sippy cups and little snack cups.  Then Costco started carrying Goldfish crackers in 4lb boxes, so our kids are never, ever without a snack and a drink.  


Edited by nextcommercial - 10/6/11 at 9:05am
post #25 of 42

This is such a loaded subject.  I just want to support you Op, in your feelings of concern about your dd.  I really don't think it's unusual to feel some heartbreak for our kids when they have a difficult issue in their lives.  It's a first step, often before we mobilize to acknowledge an issue, seek help, and make a plan.  Your emotions indicate compassion, worry and concern.  Is it helpful to put those emotions on our kids?  No, but that doesn't seem to be the situation here.

 

I've watched, in my extended family, a preadolescent child come to truly be affected by weight and body image issues.  For a very long time there was no acknowledgement of this child's eating or exercise needs for fear of damaging her self esteem.  Now that she's older, she can't wear the clothes she wants to, feels awkward, and is struggling to be physically active.  It is emotionally a very hard place to be, and it's taking a lot of effort to help the situation.

 

You have to balance this with an understanding of what happens to kids before and during puberty, which frankly challenged all of my notions about how much kids need to eat, sleep, and how they grow!

 

A low level organized sport may be helpful.  My dd is an athlete, and is very tall for her age, and very strong.  I have found, again and again, that sports offer a place to emphasize how a healthy body works, versus how a healthy body looks.  In my dd's sport, she needs to be strong, and her body can do everything she needs it to do.  It helps because her height and strength are assets.  In junior high, where many of her friends are petite, being able to have a place where what she's got works for her, has been invaluable.

 

post #26 of 42

Like MoonlessNightx, I am an eating disorder survivor and will respectfully disagree with the posters who believe that “health at any size” is a hoax.  An overweight teenager who eats a lot of fresh produce and whole grains and gets plenty of physical activity is MUCH healthier than the skinnier teenager who gorges herself after every binge-meal, smokes to keep her weight down, or is struggling through school while in cancer remission.  In other words, I side with the posters who say that size isn’t always an indicator of health.  Also, having been through my own personal hell with food and weight, I implore you to tread carefully with this topic. 

 

From the thread title describing a “very overweight” daughter, I imagined major clinical obesity. But it sounds from you subsequent posts (e.g. #16) that you no longer feel that way (??) 

 

 

 

Quote:

Please understand, I am not ashamed or embarassed. I think she is beautiful, and I am proud of her in every way.  I am devastated for HER. She knows she is big. It upets her greatly, but she doesn't know how to change it, and I don't know what to tell her. I try to tell her that it's just a little puppy fat and that it's normal, but she just gives me the, "oh, please" look.  I am crying as I write this, because part of me feels like I am betraying her when I talk about it. 

 

It sounds like if she is this upset, she is motivated to make some changes.  My humble opinion: Before you even *consider* Weight Watchers (and I agree with the PP that that’s the healthiest weight loss option, and that you should make her lifestyle changes a part of the whole family), I would STRONGLY recommend a visit to the nutritionist.  Contrary to popular belief, doctors get only minimal (if any!) training in nutrition during medical school, and a professional nutritionist or dietician can evaluate her diet and lifestyle and help her make changes that make her feel good and healthy.  This professional can also help you determine if weight loss is even necessary. 

 

I know, I know.  The assumption in most of this thread is that it is.  But respectfully, if your daughter has stretch marks on her breasts, she’s not prepubescent; she is an adolescent.  Early adolescence, for multiple complex reasons, is increasing rapidly in younger generations. A competent nutritionist or dietician (and your physician may provide a referral) can better assess whether this extra weight is innocuous (e.g. preceeding another adolescent growth spurt) or requires more aggressive intervention such as Weight Watchers.  And it’s win-win because you’ll be able to draft the healthies possible eating habits for her and the entire family.  (Yes, the whole family needs to get involved.  It's less isolating and ostracising for her and, frankly, good for everybody). 

 

As for physical activity, make sure that she gets involved in something as close as possible to her passions.  If she simply doesn’t *like* sports, she’ll just end up bench-warming, feeling resentful, and—you guessed it—not exercising.  If she enjoys Zumba, great.  If she doesn’t, encourage her to explore some other unique avenues—Martial arts?  Hiking?  Rock climbing?  Irish dancing (hellavu workout!  Lol!)?  Repeated experience has taught me that exercise never takes hold as a habit unless it’s something you love.

 

I’m not speaking as a mother to teenagers—I’m not there yet!—but I’m speaking as someone who went off the deep end with this issue.  What can I say?  It’s a sensitive topic for me.  But I can tell that you're committed to being a good mother and doing and saying the right thing.  Many hugs, and best of luck in your transition toward a new and healthy lifestyle!     hug2.gif

 

post #27 of 42


Veering off-topic, but I have to disagree.  I just finished reading Free Range Kids by Lenore Skenazy.  She actually did the research, including interviews with statisticians, and found that crime rates have plummeted and stranger abductions are exceedingly rare.  (You'd have to leave your child in your front yard for 750,000 to wait for a stranger abduction).  Of course she advocates for common sense safety, but she also shows how out-of-proporation our parental fears have become.  This book completely changed my perspective...If you don't read her book, at least check out her blog: http://freerangekids.wordpress.com/

 

I do think that media-induced parental paranoia may be a contributing factor to overweight children... 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nextcommercial View Post

 

I personally think Americans are overweight because of the last half of the 80s.  In the 80s it became obvious that our kids weren't safe playing outside...so, we started watching them closely, which meant they couldn't do all the things they were always doing.  It truly just wasn't safe.  Nothing can ever change that.  We can't even let our kids walk to school alone.  
 

 

post #28 of 42

I hit puberty well ahead of most of my peers.  I stopped growing at about grade 5, and had stretch marks all over my body throughout middle school as my hips and chest changed rapidly.  If my mother had been saddened by the fact that I had stretch marks I would have felt terrible.  I also would have picked up on it even if she hadn't said anything.

 

There is SO much pressure to fit the stereotypes at these ages, girls will feel the pressure to be slim throughout their lives, and girls who develop as I did, and as the OP describes her child to be developing are already in such a hard place.  They are at risk of eating disorders in an effort to look like their peers when their DNA is simply not letting that happen if they are healthy.  They can only get to that point of 'thin' by starving themselves.  What they need to hear is that they are ok, and that if it is important to them to try to look different, you can explore that with them, and that the family as a WHOLE will make changes in support of a healthy lifestyle.   They need to be advised that weight loss isn't a healthy goal for any developing body, but that certainly it is ok to make sure to remain active and eat healthy fuel for our bodies. They also need to know that hitting puberty and developing thighs and breasts and yes- even that annoying stomach bump every healthy woman has- is something that happens to all of us at different times, and that many of their friends envy the fact that while they look like little kids, she is beginning to look older. 

 

I looked 16 when I was 11.  I didn't need my parents worrying about my weight, I did that enough for all of us. 

post #29 of 42

I agree with the pp that you should avoid making her feel bad about her weight or think of "dieting." I also agree that a child should not be encouraged to have a different diet than her family, if there is too much sweets and fat for a healthy diet, they should be minimized for everyone's benefit regardless of everyone's body shape/size, if there is only a healthy quantity and choice of treats for everyone, everyone should be included in enjoying them.

For my dd who was historically very thin and then plumped up with puberty, I have chosen to take a position of ensuring her schedule has plenty of exercise.  She transitioned away from the "play" that had been so physically active as a little girl to more sedantary pasttimes which just didn't match her preferred caloric intake(which would be fine except if all she was doing is listening to music and reading). 

The way I do this is by scheduling alot of physical activity of her choice into her week (horseback riding, gymnastics and karate) and days like today with extra free time and nothing physical scheduled I recommend she go ride her bike or take a walk.  She knows I am always available to walk and talk with her, but more often than not she will jump on her bike.  She still has a bit of a tummy roll, but it is looking more balanced all the time.  I don't really think the exercise gets all of the credit... I think some of that roll was the onset of puberty and would have minimized anyway, but it may help to find out if there is anything physical she would like to be doing if you can swing  the cost and transportation to do it. 

post #30 of 42

I hate to tell you this, but 12 is pubescent, so it's unclear how much of this really might be due to her being in a period of major growth.

 

There's a good book by Weight Watchers that's very reasonable about the subject: Weight Watchers Family Power: 5 Simple Rules for a Healthy-Weight Home. The thing I like about this book is that the "rules" are positive rules:

 

1. Focus on wholesome, nutritious foods.

2. Include treats.

3. Keep screen time to under 2 hours a day.

4. Try to be active an hour a day.

5. The rules apply to everyone.

 

I really like the fact that no one person is singled out. You can (without even telling your kids) take a look at what you're eating -- are they getting enough protein, 5 servings of fruits and veggies, complex carbs that will keep them full, and minimal refined sugar? If you are, then great. If not, you can work on improving the whole family's diet.

 

Treats are an important part of the plan because again, you don't want to develop eating disorders by ruling them out. I buy donuts about 2x a year. My kids would eat them constantly, but really, I think the concept of donut and nutritious are about polar opposites.

 

The 'active an hour a day' might be something that you do together. Where can you walk to as a family? Or as a mother-daughter pair? Could you set your sights on doing something like a 5K or 10 K walk, and 'train' for that together. (Something like the Race for the Cure, or whatever cause might be near and dear to her heart.) Don't do this to make her train, but as a bonding experience for the two of you. What does she like to do that's physical? My dd loves swimming and hates all other sports. She's in swim lessons now so that when she gets older, she and I can go lap swimming together, if she wants. She's never going to be a size 5, and I'm fine with that. But she has a beautiful body for swimming -- strong broad shoulders + a little buoyancy from a tiny bit of extra padding. Right now she's strong and healthy.

 

Don't limit food. If her portion sizes are too big, then get smaller plates for the whole family. Make sure that family meals are eaten together. Don't let anyone eat in front of the TV or computer. But remember, she's growing.

 

 

post #31 of 42

Including everyone is possibly the best way to go.  I think if I were to tell DD2 she needed to lose a bit she'd look at me and slap my booty...
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnS6 View Post

I hate to tell you this, but 12 is pubescent, so it's unclear how much of this really might be due to her being in a period of major growth.

 

There's a good book by Weight Watchers that's very reasonable about the subject: Weight Watchers Family Power: 5 Simple Rules for a Healthy-Weight Home. The thing I like about this book is that the "rules" are positive rules:

 

1. Focus on wholesome, nutritious foods.

2. Include treats.

3. Keep screen time to under 2 hours a day.

4. Try to be active an hour a day.

5. The rules apply to everyone.

 

I really like the fact that no one person is singled out. You can (without even telling your kids) take a look at what you're eating -- are they getting enough protein, 5 servings of fruits and veggies, complex carbs that will keep them full, and minimal refined sugar? If you are, then great. If not, you can work on improving the whole family's diet.

 

Treats are an important part of the plan because again, you don't want to develop eating disorders by ruling them out. I buy donuts about 2x a year. My kids would eat them constantly, but really, I think the concept of donut and nutritious are about polar opposites.

 

The 'active an hour a day' might be something that you do together. Where can you walk to as a family? Or as a mother-daughter pair? Could you set your sights on doing something like a 5K or 10 K walk, and 'train' for that together. (Something like the Race for the Cure, or whatever cause might be near and dear to her heart.) Don't do this to make her train, but as a bonding experience for the two of you. What does she like to do that's physical? My dd loves swimming and hates all other sports. She's in swim lessons now so that when she gets older, she and I can go lap swimming together, if she wants. She's never going to be a size 5, and I'm fine with that. But she has a beautiful body for swimming -- strong broad shoulders + a little buoyancy from a tiny bit of extra padding. Right now she's strong and healthy.

 

Don't limit food. If her portion sizes are too big, then get smaller plates for the whole family. Make sure that family meals are eaten together. Don't let anyone eat in front of the TV or computer. But remember, she's growing.

 

 



 

post #32 of 42

I have sons who are identical twins. I would not have thought of J as overweight - until I looked at him next to his brother. Watching their eating habits was telling as well - J would regularly take third helpings at meals; B rarely would. Their activity levels were similar, but J ate more, and it showed.

 

I have always struggled with my weight, and have managed to both lose weight over the years, and maintain my weight. The boys know this, and understand that I know what I'm talking about.

 

OP, since your daughter feels that she is overweight, and is upset about it, there's no reason NOT to talk to her about it.Not doing so might give the impression that her weight is too horrible a subject to discuss - or that you don't care enough to bother (I know this isn't the case, but teens can interpret stuff in strange ways). Open, honest conversation about uncomfortable topics is so important - it isn't easy, but it's important. If you and your daughter can't talk about her weight, how will you be able to talk about drugs, sex, alcohol, depression? But I digress...

 

If it's something that concerns her, as it obviously concerns you, there should be no problem bringing her to the doctor to rule out (or identify) a medical cause.

 

In the case of my son, I simply mentioned that he looked like he was putting on some pounds. We talked about portion size, and I suggested he stop to ask himself if it was his tummy or his mouth that wanted that extra helping. We have never EVER encouraged our kids to eat everything on their plates. We didn't monitor his weight; we simply encouraged healthy food choices and reasonable portions. We don't have a lot of sweets in the house, but we never discouraged J from having a treat or a dessert if it was available. I told him that I wasn't worried about his weight, but I wanted him to develop healthy habits that he'll carry with him for the rest of his life, so he doesn't face a constant or lifetime weight battle.

 

Gradually, over several months, he trimmed down, without ever feeling like he was "on a diet". My kids watched me lose 35 pounds in 6 months (post-baby, pre-brother's wedding). I wasn't "on a diet"; I changed my eating habits. Technically it's the same thing, but being "on a diet" imlies that at some point you will be off the diet, and your eating will return to what it was, and the weight will come back.

 

Talk to your daughter about her weight. Talk to her about everything - in 5 years, you'll be glad you did.

post #33 of 42
Thread Starter 

Thanks again to everyone for the support and ideas.  I am going to check out the WW stuff - I used to do it a few years back myself when I was shedding baby weight, but wasn't sure about doing it with a preteen.

 

You're all right, she is pubescent, not prepubescent...I was using prepubescent in the way that she has not started menstruating yet, but indeed, body changes have been happening for about a year now. As I said before, a lot of people I know bulked up  considerably around her age, but this is beyond that, size wise.

 

Good news: we had an honest talk yesterday about how she feels about her body, and she is very very gung-ho to start walking with me, and mentioned even trying out running (GOOD! we can do it together!).  The appointment has been made for the doc for blood work requisitions, and we are on our way, just like that.  She was grateful that I approached her, and it didn't hurt her as I thought it would.

 

Thanks again all, for your well wishes and advice.

 

April

post #34 of 42

As a mother to 2 daughters and someone with a poor body image, I can only image in how you must feel and disagree so strongly with the people that are saying the she is heathy at her weight and leave her alone.  The world doesn't treat overweight people the same and it isn't healthy to be overweight.  Why would you want your DD's life to me any more difficult than it has to be.  I think you shoudl talk to your Dr. and talk to her about her weight from a health perspective, not a weight loss perspective but I think it should be address. 

post #35 of 42


Good Job Mama!  And good luck to both of you!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by April*autmaiajude* View Post

Thanks again to everyone for the support and ideas.  I am going to check out the WW stuff - I used to do it a few years back myself when I was shedding baby weight, but wasn't sure about doing it with a preteen.

 

You're all right, she is pubescent, not prepubescent...I was using prepubescent in the way that she has not started menstruating yet, but indeed, body changes have been happening for about a year now. As I said before, a lot of people I know bulked up  considerably around her age, but this is beyond that, size wise.

 

Good news: we had an honest talk yesterday about how she feels about her body, and she is very very gung-ho to start walking with me, and mentioned even trying out running (GOOD! we can do it together!).  The appointment has been made for the doc for blood work requisitions, and we are on our way, just like that.  She was grateful that I approached her, and it didn't hurt her as I thought it would.

 

Thanks again all, for your well wishes and advice.

 

April



 

post #36 of 42

That's a great update!  

 

I think you're totally on the right path with walking and running.  I'm going to go off on a related tangent. bag.gif   [tangent] If you and dd are going to get active together, you might try the run- walk- run method.  It's supposed to be the way to go for beginners.  Check out the Couch to 5K method web page:

 

http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/181.shtml

 

Also check out this essay by Olympic runner Jeff Galloway, http://www.jeffgalloway.com/fitkids.html.  He developed another run walk run method. Don't know how it compares to the C25K, but I'm currently reading his book Running, Getting Started, and it's really inspiring. 

 

http://www.amazon.com/Running-Getting-Started-Jeff-Galloway/dp/1841262420/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1318013711&sr=8-2-fkmr0

 

My 12 y.o. son is overweight. I don't know by how much, but it doesn't matter, I can plainly see that he's overweight. Dh and I are starting the C25K program, and I want to include ds in it (and dd for that matter, though she isn't overweight).  I really believe that if we're all 4 in this together we will all enjoy it more.  And it won't be about losing weight, it'll be about the whole family getting active and doing something together.

[/tangent]

 

 

 

 

post #37 of 42

Thanks for the update, April - the mantra in our house is "We'll get through this, and we'll get through it together". Having a relationship with my sons (they are 17) where they feel they can talk to me about anything and everything - even if it might be something I don't really want to hear - has been so important in our family.

 

I'm glad you were able to have an honest, respectful, and trusting discussion with your daughter, and you are working toward a solution together. You must both feel a tremendous sense of relief to have it out in the open!

post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by April*autmaiajude* View Post


I love to hear the positive things about the stretch marks. I am SO relieved, Adaline'sMama to hear about how yours have gone or faded to that degree.


My dh grew rapidly during puberty and has stretch marks on his thighs.  He had 3% body fat during that time.  I'm the only one who sees them now and they are barely noticable but they are there and were just from his rapid growth.

 

post #39 of 42

This has been an interesting thread to read through!  I worked for a number of years with teens and their families who were having issues with weight and improving healthy lifestyles.  It's great to approach the issue from a health and fitness angle and work together as a family.  Meeting with a nutritionist who is used to working with teens is a great way to set healthy goals for improving nutrition, moderate and weight loss and increased activity.  Nutritionists also can provide a lot of strategies to use regarding serving healthy portions, grocery shopping, eating out or just hanging out at a friend's house.  A nutritionist can be a great coach for you AND your daughter, and often is a LOT better at discussing the social/emotional issues of weight than a pediatrician. If appropriate, she would advise you on weight loss and how to set reasonable and safe goals.

 

A couple of things from my experience with teens and families that worked really well:  Set up a "reward"system for attaining goals.  I would focus not so much on food related goals, but on activity or some other healthy behavior change.  For example, you could set a goal of walking 30 minutes X days a week.  Devise a small reward after reaching this goal for 1 week and maybe a bit larger reward for doing this for a month.  Small rewards could be anything exciting/motivating to your daughter and appropriate for your family....just don't make it a food 'treat', and make sure you can actually follow through on the reward.  

 

As the holidays are coming up, try to focus celebrations on something besides (only!) eating.  Think of fun crafts or activities to do vs. baking cookies or treats, or come up with some healthy options.  Help your daughter to think of fun things to do with her friends besides hanging out and eating....go ice skating, skiing, sledding, bowling, etc....  You can help her make subtle changes in what she does without calling attention to "dieting" or exercise.  If you have a Wii game, some of the dancing/activity games are really fun to do as a family or with friends. Small positive changes add up over time!

 

Sounds like you are working together to make healthy changes for your whole family.  She's lucky to have you for a mama!!

 

 

post #40 of 42

There's a program called Couch to 5K that works really well for some people -- maybe you can set as a goal to do a 5K run together! http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/181.shtml -- it's very moderate (3 times a week), and starts off mostly walking. Make sure, whether you run or walk that you get GOOD shoes for both of you to prevent injury.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Preteens and Teens
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Preteens and Teens › My Very Overweight 11yo - At A Loss!