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do you urge your children to "color in the lines"? - Page 2

post #21 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post

 

Yeah, my kids got colouring books and enjoyed using them. They also did a lot of other creative, artsy stuff, and still do. They both attended a performing arts school for high school. I don't think colouring between the lines as kids throttled the creativity out of them. 

 

 



I don't think it is the coloring in the lines that throttles the creativity out of them, it is the mthodology used to teach it.  The idea that coloring outside the lines is WRONG or "bad".  The idea that a child is behind and needs to do extra work outside of class (rather than playing) to catch up to their peers' ability to color in the lines.

 

It's not the activity, it's the pressure and total lack of differentiation for different output, talents, and skills.  It is the close-minded way in which the children who do not color in the lines are criticized by those who want them to.

 

For me that has always been the big objection, not the request that my children do so,  but the way it was used as a measuring stick for their value in the classroom community. It is the total lack of tolerance for different strengths and weaknesses, and different skills and talents that frustrates me. 

 

ETA: As an educator, I feel it is simply poor practice to offer only one way of expressing a knowledge or skill and rubbishing one's attempts at an assessment activity with which they are uncomfortable and perhaps merely inept at completing. A teacher should always have multiple ways of forming and assessing skills, and never rely on the output of ONE activity to measure a student's progress. 


Edited by hakeber - 10/30/11 at 8:17am
post #22 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by hakeber View Post

 

So...I get why a primary school teacher, escpecially ones who has been teaching for twenty odd years in the system, thinks this is a vital part of their syllabus, but I think they are  being incredibly short sighted and would definitely go to the mat over the issue if I felt the comments were belittling his efforts, or diminishing his self-esteem or love for learning.

 

 


Well, chances are that a teacher who makes belittling comments and diminishes the self-esteem and love of learning of their students isn't confining that attitude to a colour-between-the-lines exercise. It's the teacher, not the activity, that is the problem there. I'd definitely intervene in that kind of situation too. 

post #23 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by hakeber View Post



I don't think it is the coloring in the lines that throttles the creativity out of them, it is the mthodology used to teach it.  The idea that coloring outside the lines is WRONG or "bad".  The idea that a child is behind and needs to do extra work outside of class (rather than playing) to catch up to their peers' ability to color in the lines.

 

It's not the activity, it's the pressure and total lack of differentiation for different output, talents, and skills.  It is the close-minded way in which the children who do not color in the lines are criticized by those who want them to.

 

For me that has always been the big objection, not the request that my children do so,  but the way it was used as a measuring stick for their value in the classroom community. It is the total lack of tolerance for different strengths and weaknesses, and different skills and talents that frustrates me. 

 

ETA: As an educator, I feel it is simply poor practice to offer only one way of expressing a knowledge or skill and rubbishing one's attempts at an assessment activity with which they are uncomfortable and perhaps merely inept at completing. A teacher should always have multiple ways of forming and assessing skills, and never rely on the oputput of ONE activity to measure a student's progress. 


Cross-posted, ha! 

 

I agree that bad teaching is the problem.  

 

 

 

post #24 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post


Well, chances are that a teacher who makes belittling comments and diminishes the self-esteem and love of learning of their students isn't confining that attitude to a colour-between-the-lines exercise. It's the teacher, not the activity, that is the problem there. I'd definitely intervene in that kind of situation too. 



Exactly...some kids LOVE to color in the lines,  It gives them great satisfaction to see the image come to life in perfect ways.  This does not mean they are imagination-less drones doomed to be cogs in the machine...it's what THEY are good at and likely that talent will be a great asset to society.  We need people who can fine tune the chaos of this world and fill in the color of the outlines.  Those skills and talents should be celebrated!

 

But if a child isn't good at that, why can't their skills and talents be celebrated too?  Ya know?  I just find so many teachers measure their students by a checklist instead of thinking creatively about how they can express their skills and knowledge in other ways.  How can we get our students to think outside of the box if we are constantly putting them into boxes?

 


Edited by hakeber - 10/30/11 at 9:04am
post #25 of 75

I clearly remember when I was 4 and my mother had my brother and I doing a craft project with her. She gave us each a coloring picture of a rose and told us to color it and make it pretty. I picked up a black crayon and began scribbling all over it. I thought it was beautiful and it was just how I wanted it. She got onto me about it. "Roses can't be black and you're supposed to color in the lines! Now it's ugly. Don't you want it to be pretty?" She gave me a new page, and I did it the "right" way in pink, but I was hurt and I hated the "pretty" one. There was nothing enjoyable about it, and I resisted doing any sort of craft with her for a long time. Doing it my way, I was being creative and making my own art, even if no one else appreciated it. It was beautiful to me. If my kids are going to do something crafty/artsy, I want it to be a chance for them to be creative and love what they're doing, even if it's a coloring page (which we don't often do). Doing it to someone else's specifications takes the magic out of it, imo. Art should be about self-expression, not people pleasing. There are other activities to teach fine motor skills and such. I'm not going to suck the joy out of art for those purposes.

post #26 of 75

Not at home, nor am I too found of it in the school system.

 

Colouring is associated with art - there are many values associate with art - creativity is a big one.  Creativity and being told to colour in the lines do not go together.  

 

In school, kids often have few choices.  They are told when to speak, when not to, when to eat, when to go to the bathroom, that their title must be centerred, that the name date and classroom go in the upper corner, etc, etc.

 

Let them have the freedom to figure out how to colour in their own picture.  I am all for letting kids have choices and some freedom, even in school, and art (with its value on creativity) seems like a good place to start.

 

There are many other ways to promote fine motor skills.  

 

post #27 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by tooraloora View Post

I clearly remember when I was 4 and my mother had my brother and I doing a craft project with her. She gave us each a coloring picture of a rose and told us to color it and make it pretty. I picked up a black crayon and began scribbling all over it. I thought it was beautiful and it was just how I wanted it. She got onto me about it. "Roses can't be black and you're supposed to color in the lines! Now it's ugly. Don't you want it to be pretty?" She gave me a new page, and I did it the "right" way in pink, but I was hurt and I hated the "pretty" one. There was nothing enjoyable about it, and I resisted doing any sort of craft with her for a long time. 


I know 2 people (my husband and my mother) who stopped drawing in childhood because of criticism of other people.

 

I do think there is a place for criticism in art - for an older kid who has signed up for an art class.

 

I know kids are not adults and it does not apply in all situation - but I do occasionally like to ask myself if this would be acceptable if it happened to adults.  I cannot imagine I would tolerate anyone criticizing my artwork outside of an art class or if I had asked for a critique.  I would consider an unsolicited opinion very rude.  

 

Let your kids have their own art process.

 

post #28 of 75

I encourage my oldest to slow down and pay attention to what he is doing on schoolwork, this results in coloring in the lines. He is another kid who will scribble all over something, rushing through, sometimes without even looking at it. But any other coloring (and especially something that we're going to cut out anyway), I let them do whatever they want.

post #29 of 75

No. I want to let my daughter explore drawing the way she wants.

post #30 of 75

There are other ways to teach them all the things mentioned as to why it's important.  DH won't color at all because he still has that fear he won't do it right.

post #31 of 75

We've been teaching why coloring in the lines is important and why NOT coloring in the lines is important.  At 9yo, dd is already getting it.  Sometimes you need to do so and sometimes you need to NOT do so.  It goes beyond just creativity and art.  Learning when both are à propos, to me, is the important lesson to take away... that neither is right or wrong and they need to be applied at different times in all aspects of life.


Edited by velochic - 10/30/11 at 11:08am
post #32 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by tooraloora View Post

I clearly remember when I was 4 and my mother had my brother and I doing a craft project with her. She gave us each a coloring picture of a rose and told us to color it and make it pretty. I picked up a black crayon and began scribbling all over it. I thought it was beautiful and it was just how I wanted it. She got onto me about it. "Roses can't be black and you're supposed to color in the lines! Now it's ugly. Don't you want it to be pretty?" She gave me a new page, and I did it the "right" way in pink, but I was hurt and I hated the "pretty" one.



Funny dd had a very similar experience when she was making a Father's Day card for dh. They were making little cards that looked like suits with a tie (which is really funny because dh doesn't even OWN  a suit that fits him). Dd wanted both the suit and the tie to be black. Her teacher suggested/requested (it was being relayed by a  7 year old, so who knows?) that she make it more colorful. Dd complied, but then came home in tears because it wasn't the way she had envisioned it. Luckily, the design was easily replicable, and I made her a new one and let her do it her way. I have to say, she took much more care with the all black 'suit' and tie, and with the white part left behind to look like a shirt, it looked really snazzy. Grrr... for her teacher.

post #33 of 75

Interesting thread.  I guess I was a weird kid.  I got a kick out of trying to color inside the lines. I'd zone out, focusing on the fine line between inside and outside.  I enjoyed picking colors that seemed to be 'right' for the object. lol! I think that's part of my literal-mindedness.

 

However I don't think I ever urged my kids to color inside the lines, and heaven knows they certainly didn't.  Perhaps I should have; they both struggle/struggled with neat hand writing.


 

post #34 of 75

No.

post #35 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by journeymom View Post

Interesting thread.  I guess I was a weird kid.  I got a kick out of trying to color inside the lines. I'd zone out, focusing on the fine line between inside and outside.  I enjoyed picking colors that seemed to be 'right' for the object. lol! I think that's part of my literal-mindedness.

 


 

 

Oh me too!  To this day, if I see an interesting black and white ad, unusual fonts, etc. in a magazine, I want to color it.  Just thinking about the percision and filling in those colors relaxes me.

 

My DS is struggling with his writing.  On one hand, I know he will catch up eventually.  On the other, it really, really bothers him that he can't do it as well as the other kids.  Encouraging him to color within the lines solely for the motor skills development was suggested to me by an occupational therapist as well as his teacher, both who are creative, fun people that use "within the line" coloring as a developmental tool.

post #36 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caneel View Post

 

My DS is struggling with his writing.  On one hand, I know he will catch up eventually.  On the other, it really, really bothers him that he can't do it as well as the other kids.  Encouraging him to color within the lines solely for the motor skills development was suggested to me by an occupational therapist as well as his teacher, both who are creative, fun people that use "within the line" coloring as a developmental tool.



I think there is a big difference between:

 

Class, here is a colouring page - all pictures need to be done between the lines or you will have to redo it

 

and

 

John, I know you are struggling a bit with messy handwriting.  Your teacher and I thought up so cool ways to improve your fine motor control - mazes, colouring neatly, etc.

 

 

One is imposing your aesthetics on their artistic expression, the other is offering colouring neatly as a tool for a person struggling with fine motor issues.  I would even separate out normal colouring (where one can do what one wants) from colouring to improve fine-motor control.    It is similar to writing - writing in diaries is personal and no one gets to comment on it; while assignments and the like people do get to comment on.  Some colouring is personal and should be left comment free, while others might be for specific purposes (such as fine-motor skills colouring).

 

 

post #37 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post



I think there is a big difference between:

 

Class, here is a colouring page - all pictures need to be done between the lines or you will have to redo it

 

and

 

John, I know you are struggling a bit with messy handwriting.  Your teacher and I thought up so cool ways to improve your fine motor control - mazes, colouring neatly, etc.

 

 

One is imposing your aesthetics on their artistic expression, the other is offering colouring neatly as a tool for a person struggling with fine motor issues.  I would even separate out normal colouring (where one can do what one wants) from colouring to improve fine-motor control.    It is similar to writing - writing in diaries is personal and no one gets to comment on it; while assignments and the like people do get to comment on.  Some colouring is personal and should be left comment free, while others might be for specific purposes (such as fine-motor skills colouring).

 

 

 

Oh, yes, I absolutely agree.  

 

 We are drowning in art at home and I love all of the stuff he creates.  OT but what do you all do with all those pictures/creations? 

 

post #38 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caneel View Post

 

 

 

 We are drowning in art at home and I love all of the stuff he creates.  OT but what do you all do with all those pictures/creations? 

 



I have recycled most.  I feel bad about it, but we have issues with too much stuff in our house. 

 

I do put some on the wall and keep some of the cooler stuff in boxes (perhaps 1/10 for my non arty kids to 1/100 for my 8 year old who produced an average of 10 drawings a day!)  

 

some people photograph stuff they love but do not want to keep. 

 

 

post #39 of 75

I try to spin it to him that giving it as gifts to Nana, Aunt Judy and so and so (all who flip over this type of stuff) would make them very happy so he does "gift" some of it.  I need a day to myself to purge.  (God forbid he see me get rid of anything!)

post #40 of 75

I keep one small box for DD's artwork. Ever so often, I have DD sort through her newer stuff and what's in the box, and she picks and chooses enough to refill the box, and then the rest goes through the paper shredder to be used either for packing material, papier-mâché, paper clay, or homemade paper. I emphasis that it's going on to serve a new purpose instead of just being trashed, and she's totally on board with that.

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