or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › Nutrition and Good Eating › Dairy free without soy?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Dairy free without soy? - Page 2

post #21 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarineWife View Post

I mainly want to eliminate dairy right now. I just didn't want to use soy as a substitute. So I'm not too concerned with the hidden soy in things at this point. Like I said, my main concern is finding something to sub for all the cheese I eat. I love cheese. I eat it by itself as a snack to get in extra protein. I don't want to use soy-based cheeses or yogurts (I don't eat yogurt, anyway, but do like to use it in place of mayo) as a sub for the dairy based ones. I hadn't even thought about butter. I use regular butter instead of margarine to avoid trans-fats. If that Earth Balance is an oil-based margarine (what else could it be if it's dairy and soy free?), I don't really want to use it.

Oh how I hear you on this.  I've been vegetarian for at least 13 years and cheese is a big protein source for me.  Yogurt also.  I hate to write this because it isn't something I like to hear myself....you just have to accept there is no *true* replacement for cheese and instead look for other protein sources.  You can replace it in a mental way but that doesn't get you the same protein.  You are talking about needing the protein and needing it quick and easy.  We are eliminating dairy to see how that affects my son and it is sooooo hard for me and I've already been cooking vegan (very little obvious soy) for many years.  When you have a main food it is so hard to suddenly have it gone!  Anyway, we are a pretty nut heavy house so what I'm doing won't work for you.  But you may be surprised at how much protein you are already getting.  I had to track protein for a week when we took Bradley classes and was surprised at how much protein I was getting and where it was coming from.  Finding a list of protein sources would be a great place to start and then just figure out what would work for you.  We like to eat chickpeas as a snack.  That is the only quick, non-nut thing that I can think of at the moment that we do here, most of our protein comes from meals and our snacks give us other things.  I was trying to "replace" yogurt at first and I gave that idea up too, realizing there is just no true replacement for it.  So now I'm trying to replace what it provided nutritionally but for me my yogurt was a comfort food, it just can't be mentally replaced and I feel very hungry without it.  Vegan cooking doesn't have to use obvious soy.  I've been avoiding it for years and it we have fallen back on some of it recently but only because with a 5 month old and almost 4 year old, it is still hard to cook...well if my hubby didn't work so much it would be easier to cook that is the real problem.  I'm juggling babe now so have to go, wasn't able to read all the replies so hopefully I'm not saying what has already been said.  Oh only other thing, I don't know what the Daiya cheese is made from, but I think the taste is subjective.  I've heard that some love it and can't tell the difference and same haaaate it with a passion.  I was excited when I saw the previous poster state she couldn't tell the difference until I saw that she also felt that way about the Amy's mac n' cheese which I could tolerate while eating but it made me feel queasy after, and I thought the coconut yogurts were tolerable at best.  Everyone's tastes are so unique, it makes it tough when you are just starting out on a new eating plan.  I'm still going to try the Daiya but I've come to the realization that any cheese substitute I use is just to ease the mental missing of cheese, I look for the nutritional needs elsewhere...much cheaper that way too!  ha!

 

post #22 of 48

To go dairy free, it's usually easier to find other things to eat rather than finding subs.  You won't find a cheese sub that's as good as the real thing, especially if you're eating it on it's own.  If you're eating meat, you should be fine with protein.  If you really want to see if dairy-free will make you feel better, you need to eliminate everything.  Casein is in lots of things so you'll have to check labels carefully.

 

We use rice milk, Earth Balance, coconut oil and nutritional yeast mostly.   I do think it will be difficult to find many convienence foods that don't have soy.

post #23 of 48
Thread Starter 
i don't eat a lot of meat, usually just one meal a day. i guess i'll have to eat more if i'm going to do this. i've started by adding eggs back into my breakfast.

i'm breastfeeding so i need more protein than usual. plus, i believe that we need more protein than is recommended.

yeah,, most convenience foods have at least one of the 3 i want to avoid.

this would be so much easier if my dh were home.
post #24 of 48
I don't think I saw why you are going dairy free. Is it an allergy. If so have you tried none cow sources? I don't like sheep or goat. What I have found though that my dd does not have a problem with is water buffalo cheese. It is mozzarella, I buy it at Costco only place close to reasonable price. We were complete dairy free for over 18 months when I discovered this. It is excellent. For SO yogurt I buy that at Sunflower because they are .50-.70 cents cheaper than elsewhere and it is expensive. I make my own coconut milk ice cream there are lots of recipes on the web for it. For baking unless it is something that needs a distinct butter taste we use coconut oil. My daughter loves coconut manna which has a decent protien content we put it on her oatmeal in the morning that is when she hasn't eaten it all before the oatmeal is ready.
post #25 of 48

I had to go dairy free when I found out I was severely allergic to it and so is one of my sons.  As a family we are dairy free, gluten free and sugar free.  I do not replace with soy b/c of the estrogen in it and I don't want my five sons having that. ;) I like having quesadillas on corn tortillas for a snack so I tried several different types of cheeses.  In the beginning, I had a hard time finding cheeses that would melt, but I have finally found several and I have enjoyed lots of different cheeses made with goat milk or sheep milk.  Some even have cocoa on them or wine.  None are going to taste like American cheese, but I have found so many better (imo) options.  My local grocer just got Daiya in and I really don't care for it that much, but my 19 mos old liked eating it. :)  I have tried different yogurts too.  I especially like the coconut milk based ones.  We have eaten yogurt made with almond milk and goat milk too.  I actually feel like I have more options than I used to. :)  Our palettes have changed and I never miss being sick. :) 

 

Since you don't like to cook and want some quick snacks:  Some pre-packed bars that are really yummy are Larabars.  They are sweetened with dates and have lots of different flavors. I never eat the chocolate or peanut ones, but there are still lots of options.  My kids call them candy bars. :)  Also Revolution bars I just recently discovered are SUPER good, but a little pricey for me with six kids.  ;)  We also just saw Wonder bars, but I haven't personally tried those yet.  The hardest part for us was the transition, just finding out what we could eat.  I don't like staying in the kitchen long and there are lots of easy recipes that don't take long that we prepare.  Going dairy free will help you feel better!  And, think of all the wonderful new foods you get to try! :-)

post #26 of 48

I am so glad to have found this post! I have just started eliminating dairy from my diet for the sake of breast-feeding my daughter. She seems to be having digestive issues, so I am hoping cutting out dairy will help.

Thanks for all of the product recommendations. I will be heading to Whole Foods soon!

post #27 of 48

We are on the GAPS diet.  Last year I was dairy and gluten free (for my Thyroid).   Now we are dairy, sugar, gluten, soy, etc. free. :)  If you are are in the midwest to west, you can look into Azure Standard which is a co-op out of Oregon with good prices and amazing shipping rates.  I also agree with Amazon.  You can order flats of canned coconut milk, etc.

 

Dairy free is important for our family now (GAPS or no) because my 5 month old daughter gets gas and eczema when I am on diary--even butter.  We bought an ice cream maker (the kind where you freeze the canister) at a thrift store, and make our own coconut milk ice cream.  We use honey for the sweetener and it is awesome!  I like to make a custard as a base with coconut milk with two eggs or yolks.  If you add a packet of Starbucks powdered instant coffee, you will think you are in heaven. :)

 

I do miss cheese.  I have started making my own humus and guacamole to go on top of things where I would normally have a dollop of sour cream or cheese.  They are also good for dipping veggies when you need a quick snack.

 

Paleo, GAPS, and SCD recipe blogs, Thai food (when I can have the rice), and my own ice cream maker helps keep me going.

 

We are trying Ghee this week (clarified butter) so see if our family can tolerate it.  Then it will be butter, then 24-hour fermented yogurt (which will be awesome for smoothies, sour cream, etc!), then some harder cheeses, etc.  The whole reason we are on GAPS is to heal our bodies so eventually we should be able to tolerate the foods again!  Here's hoping!  We currently have a raw milk source that I can't wait to take advantage of again!

post #28 of 48

The best advice I ever received was to use avocado in place of sliced cheese on sandwiches.  We're dairy, gluten, grain, soy, MSG and nightshade (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and egg plant) free.  We all love avocado so that worked well for us.  Every so often, I go back and thank the lady that gave me that bit of advice.  It's been a bit more than 2 years since we started this journey so you can see that I really appreciated her suggestion.

 

We also use a ton of coconut products.  So Delicious milk, ice cream and yogurt are treats for us.  We use Daiya Cheese sparingly.  I use Native Forest brand canned coconut milk.  It's the only canned coconut that I've found that isn't supposed to have BPA in the lining of the can.  I cook with grapeseed and Nature's Way EFA Gold brand coconut oil.  We do a lot of meat with veggies or fruit. 

 

My son, daughter and I are all fighting Candida overgrowth so our diet needs to be high in protein - at least 50% and lower in carbs.   

 

I use coconut flour and almond flour to bake.  We use Enjoy Life chocolate chips as they are soy, gluten and dairy free. 

 

If anyone comes up with a coconut or almond flour recipe for Chocolate chip cookies with cookies that turn out crispy on the outside and soft on the inside, please, let me know.  Most of the coconut and almond flour recipes that I use have lots of eggs in them making the cookie spongy not crispy on the outside.

 

Hope that helps!

post #29 of 48

I've seen flax milk (dairy, nut and soy free) in the dairy case next to the soy milk at Walmart. I hardly ever shop there. I can't say I've tried it, but it intrigued me.

post #30 of 48
Thread Starter 
would you all believe i'm allergic to avocado? greensad.gif i wish i could eat it because everyone raves about it.

i hadn't thought of non cow cheeses. i guess i thought it was all the same. i love goat cheese. i don't care for american cheese at all. i like cheddar and stilton.

i think i may need to get myself to walmart. i've been told the commissary here has more and more free foods so i need to check there, too.

i'm trying to be ok with cutting out what i can here and there rather than being able to do it all at once.

oh, i want to go dairy free because i have digestive problems. i don't know if i'm allergic. i was told once by a naturopath that dairy isn't good for my type, whatever that is.

GF for the same reason plus my 7yo has eczema.
post #31 of 48

What a bummer!  We eat a ton of avocado and guacamole.  I'm actually surprised that we haven't started having a problem with it.

 

During our last visit to our Natural Doc, we discovered that my 9yo dd is struggling with citric acid.  We knew she had some issues with citrus but I never dreamed how many things have citric acid in them.  We took her off half of her supplements because she was reacting to the citric acid in them.  We're also supposed to be avoiding sulphur containing foods like garlic and onion because she's reacting to those now.  Doc said to watch lotions, shampoos and conditioners, too.  I have no clue where I'll find a shampoo and conditioner without citric acid.  I looked into making my own once but it wasn't as simple as I thought.

 

Ugh!  And cooking with out onion and garlic?  What kind of food is it without those things?  This is going to be rough but worth it I hope!

 

I've seen recipes for "cream cheese" using the coconut cream that rises to the top of the can when it's chilled.  It was more like sour cream, IMO.  It called for 2/3 of a cup of coconut cream, 1/2 t of lemon juice and 1 t of nutritional yeast.  You mixed it together and chilled it.  When it was chilled it was slightly stiffer.  I've had the Uncheese cookbook recommended to me but I have yet to purchase it. 

 

Don't forget to check the label on fake cheeses.  Many of them have casein (dairy protein) in them.  Unless they say Vegan on them check to be sure.  We had an experience with Almond cheese.  It tasted pretty good but later I realized that it had casein in it.  Did you know it takes 21 days to get dairy out of your system?

 

Good luck!

Seana

post #32 of 48

We're on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet/GAPS diet which is dairy-free except for 24-hour yogurt and certain cheeses.  However, we make our yogurt out of coconut milk, and we make almond milk for drinking (usually mix it with coconut milk for a creamier taste and smoother mouth feel).  For the coconut yogurt recipe look at http://odddlycrunchy.blogspot.com/2011/10/quick-and-easy-coconut-milk-yogurt.html.  The books for the SCD and GAPS diets have a good ideas on going sugar-free, grain-free and (mostly) dairy-free, and you'll find a lot of recipes online if you google-search the diets.  Soy is forbidden by both diets.  Good luck!

post #33 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Odddlycrunchy View Post

We're on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet/GAPS diet which is dairy-free except for 24-hour yogurt and certain cheeses.  However, we make our yogurt out of coconut milk, and we make almond milk for drinking (usually mix it with coconut milk for a creamier taste and smoother mouth feel).  For the coconut yogurt recipe look at http://odddlycrunchy.blogspot.com/2011/10/quick-and-easy-coconut-milk-yogurt.html.  The books for the SCD and GAPS diets have a good ideas on going sugar-free, grain-free and (mostly) dairy-free, and you'll find a lot of recipes online if you google-search the diets.  Soy is forbidden by both diets.  Good luck!


I was excited about getting a coconut yogurt recipe but the link doesn't work. It says Odddlycrunchy blogspot doesn't exist. Maybe one too many ds in there?

What is GAPS?
post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarineWife View Post

would you all believe i'm allergic to avocado? greensad.gif i wish i could eat it because everyone raves about it.
i hadn't thought of non cow cheeses. i guess i thought it was all the same. i love goat cheese. i don't care for american cheese at all. i like cheddar and stilton.
i think i may need to get myself to walmart. i've been told the commissary here has more and more free foods so i need to check there, too.
i'm trying to be ok with cutting out what i can here and there rather than being able to do it all at once.
oh, i want to go dairy free because i have digestive problems. i don't know if i'm allergic. i was told once by a naturopath that dairy isn't good for my type, whatever that is.
GF for the same reason plus my 7yo has eczema.


If dairy is causing your problems, not eliminating it completley won't do anything.  To see if dairy is the actual problem, you need to remove all traces of it from your diet.  For a month at least.  Otherwise you won't get a good result.
 

 

post #35 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alyantavid View Post




If dairy is causing your problems, not eliminating it completley won't do anything.  To see if dairy is the actual problem, you need to remove all traces of it from your diet.  For a month at least.  Otherwise you won't get a good result.
 

 


Yes, I know that. It's just not something I think I can do completely all at once. I'm eliminating what I can a step at a time until I can, hopefully, eliminate it completely.
post #36 of 48

Well good luck then.

post #37 of 48

 

Quote:

I mainly want to eliminate gluten and dairy because I have digestive problems that I haven't been able to fix any other way.

I'm thinking I won't be able to do it, though. I do not cook. I don't like it.

 

I totally hear you.  I originally went GF for my 5yo son, then a couple years into that I went soy free for myself (it resolved most of my seasonal allergies), and now with DD 8mo she reacts to dairy and many other foods I have tried (including corn, tomato).  I LOVE dairy and also was using cheese as a protein.  It is hard but you can do it!

 

I was also going to recommend GAPS protocol and diet, I am planning on doing this myself but it is slow going and I'm trying to use up some GF baking mixes (kind of a splurge also) before me and the kids go on the diet.  Actually the 8mo is still EBF but she will be weaned onto GAPS to hopefully heal her gut so she will quit reacting to so many foods.  I believe both kids inherited my bad gut (I have a history of birth control pills, long term antibiotics, SAD and candida which all mess up the gut).

 

I hear you on the cooking too.  I was SAD all my life until DS was born, sugar cereals and everything, I still don't like cooking but have gotten used to it.  Just try and go with easy recipes and slow cooker recipes.

 

Info on GAPS:  http://www.gapsdiet.com/Home_Page.html

 

Quote:

 

I'm eliminating what I can a step at a time until I can, hopefully, eliminate it completely.

What type of dairy do you think is holding you back, what is the most difficult to eliminate?  Is is the cheese?  Then I would find some recipes you can use for meals that are vegan and soy free, or recipes that don't have cheese in the first place (like pizza and pasta).  Before I had to go corn free, I was using the Earth Balance soy free butter replacement as others mentioned.  I don't think it's THAT great health-wise but it's nowhere near margarine.  Perhaps only use it as a condiment, not where a recipe would call for a lot of butter.  I use olive oil now instead.

post #38 of 48

If you are seriously interested in GAPS, Cara at Health, Home, Happiness is a great resource.  For one, after one month on the GAPS intro diet, she cured her 20 some year dairy sensitivity.  For Two, she developed an eBook for how to do the intro diet to simplify it with step by step recipes, etc.  It isn't free, but it's worth it if you are serious about going down that path.  The book is also a wonderful resource.  Many, many people have cured things from Autism to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and lots of other things on the spectrum with GAPS.  There is an extremely active Yahoo group and a helpful Facebook group too. 

 

For us, I haven't done intro yet as it can be too much for a nursing baby, but just the full GAPS diet has already helped my thyroid so I've cut down my medicine twice in two months.  Anyway.  It is worth giving serious consideration too.  Once you have to cut out lots of things from your diet anyway, it makes sense to do it in such a way that you can heal yourself to go back to eating those foods eventually. HTH.

post #39 of 48

This is the url copied from the webpage address:

 

http://odddlycrunchy.blogspot.com/2011/10/quick-and-easy-coconut-milk-yogurt.html

 

(it does have 3 d's on purpose)

 

But just in case you still have problems I'll copy it here:

 

Quick and Easy Coconut Milk Yogurt

 

I revised my coconut milk yogurt recipe. It's much faster, much easier. No heating, no cooling down, no watching temperatures.  No lactose, no casein. 


The coconut milk I use is the Aroy-D in 1 litre TetraPaks.  It lists only coconuts and water as its ingredients, has won awards, is really delicious, and as far as I know, the TetraPak packaging contains no BPA, which canned coconut milk (like most canned foods) does contain.

The dates are added to provide food for the microorganisms (Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, etc).  Dates are said to be very easy to digest, but if you prefer you can replace the 5 dates with 1 Tablespoon of raw honey.  I would still process on high for 10 to 15 seconds to blend in the starter and gelatin thoroughly.

The unflavored gelatin sets the yogurt to a soft gel as it cools.  One pack of gelatin typically sets 2 cups liquid to the firm "Jell-O" consistency we all know.  Here we're doing 4+ cups, so it won't be as firm, but a gentle consistency that blends in a heavenly way with the coconut milk's creaminess. 

Keep refrigerated, like any yogurt.  Should keep well for at least a week but in my house it's gone within about a day, so it's a good thing it's quick and easy to make again!

COCONUT MILK YOGURT

Ingredients:

4 cups coconut milk (1 quart or 1 litre),  at room temperature
1 dose yogurt starter for 1 quart
1 package unflavored gelatin
(e.g.,Knox)
5 dates, pitted and plain (NOT coated with honey)
1 tsp vanilla extract (optional)

 

Directions:

1. Plug in your yogurt maker.  Assemble all the ingredients near your blender except the vanilla. Pour coconut milk into the blender jar.  Start the blender on a low speed, take off the lid, and sprinkle the unflavored gelatin and the yogurt starter into the middle of the swirling milk.  TURN OFF blender, add dates, put the lid on, and process on high for 1 minute or until dates are liquefied.   Pour into yogurt maker and allow to incubate 6 to 8 hours.

2.  After 6 to 8 hours, the yogurt will be “done”, i.e. fermented, although it will still be liquid and the cream will have risen to the top. Add the vanilla, mix well, and taste the yogurt to see if you prefer to let it ferment longer.  If it's got that great yogurt taste, cover and refrigerate. 

 

3.  After refrigerating 1 to 2 hours (if in individual cups, less than 1 hour), mix again. The gelatin will be starting to set, which will keep the yogurt from separating again. Cool 2 to 3 more hours before serving.

 

post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarineWife View Post


I was excited about getting a coconut yogurt recipe but the link doesn't work. It says Odddlycrunchy blogspot doesn't exist. Maybe one too many ds in there?
What is GAPS?


GAPS stands for Gut And Psychology Syndrome, but also for Gut And Physiology Syndrome.  We have billions of microorganisms living in our intestines.  They are like a little ecosystem in there,living in colonies somewhat like coral reefs, and their varieties and numbers have a huge role to play in our mental and physical health. The "good" bacteria provide many vitamins, and protect the gut lining.  The "bad" ones like Candida and C. difficile excrete toxins including neurotoxins.   A newborn "inherits" its first gut flora at birth, from the mother, so if the mother has gut dysbiosis (improper balance in the mini-ecosystem), the baby will have it too, leading to autism, ADD, etc, in childhood all the way to adulthood depression and schizophrenia, on the mental side, and Crohn's disease, asthma, allergies, and food intolerances on the physical side, and those are just a few of the conditions that dysbiosis can bring on.  Antibiotics destroy the ecosystem, as do other medicines we give our babies for fever, teething, etc.  Vaccinations can then be the straw that breaks the camel's back, whereas in a gut-healthy child they would not be a problem.  The other factor that can affect the ecosystem is our food: sugars and starches feed the bad bacteria.  So the GAPS diet cuts out all sugars except those in fruits and honey, and all starches (so it's also gluten-free).  Lactose is a sugar so GAPS is also dairy-free, except for those products in which the lactose has been "digested" for example certain cheeses and yogurts. 

 

So maybe you don't have to cut out ALL dairy.   The GAPS book, Gut and Psychology Syndrome by Dr. Natasha Campbell McBride, has the list of cheeses you can eat.  To me, this book is a "must-read" even if you're not going to do the diet.  I think it should be taught in high school!  It explains so many things about our health, through the generations.  You'll find yourself putting 2 and 2 together in the family history, that you never thought were related.  And this knowledge will help you prevent horrible damage like autism and IBD just by tweaking your food choices, if you're starting from a pretty healthy position. 

 

Without buying the book, there are some excellent articles online:
http://gapsdiet.com/uploads/Probiotics.pdf  and http://gapsdiet.com/uploads/GAPS.pdf

 

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Nutrition and Good Eating
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › Nutrition and Good Eating › Dairy free without soy?