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Dingoes Trot with Turkeys in November - Page 8

post #141 of 383
Thread Starter 

Geo, what happens socially in the classroom that might not be going on in the gifted classroom? I'm jumping into an assumption, but are all the kids in the gifted room happy to be there and focused on the work, or are they pulling the same hijinks that go on in the regular classroom? Not that it's the whole problem, but surely there's something stressing her out in the regular classroom. Noise? Jiggly kids? Interruptions? Chaos? I have a close friend with dyslexia, and she still has poor spelling and messy handwriting. But she's extremely literate and it has not kept her from achieving things.

 

FWIW, my kids are nearly hating going to school these days. Ds will apparently endure anything. A story I have not shared here because of the sheer stupidity of the *whole* thing recently ended with him being shunned by classmates and being told by a guidance counselor to apologize to the other kids as a means to get back into their good graces--not because he did anything wrong to them. hammer.gif It's a long and stupid story in which a teacher makes it a classroom "job" for one student to check other students' snacks for compliance with the no-junk rule...and when a certain student dutifully points out the Cheeto problem, well, you can imagine how it went down. disappointed.gif First off, parents have been clearly advised what not to send to school. Second, if a teacher wants to enforce the policy, it should not be by the hand of a peer. Third, the girl who went off the deep end over her daily Cheeto habit should probably be spoken to. Sigh. And dd feels ill every morning before school and comes home looking defeated--in spite of how well she's doing. The whole social thing is a mess.

 

Today I began exploring an online charter school at home, to see if they would take my kids, and if we could figure out a way the kids and I could perhaps spend winters here with dh. We could work ahead on school when he travels and take it easier when he's around, and start and finish the year back home. He's harumphing about it, but as I tried to explain to him, he cannot imagine what it's like for us here when he travels...because he's not here. He has no idea what our life is like when he is absent, whether we're here or there. And if I could set up something where we could leave this place as it heats up in April, and then leave WI as the snow starts in November, that might be just about perfect. Obviously all this precludes my working.

 

Happily, got some fun in at the beach and then a nice walk down in the old city along both sides of the creek, with abra rides in between.

post #142 of 383

The "kids police each other" approach to classroom management is baffling to me.  I never understood the reasoning behind that approach.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1jooj View Post

Geo, what happens socially in the classroom that might not be going on in the gifted classroom? I'm jumping into an assumption, but are all the kids in the gifted room happy to be there and focused on the work, or are they pulling the same hijinks that go on in the regular classroom? Not that it's the whole problem, but surely there's something stressing her out in the regular classroom. Noise? Jiggly kids? Interruptions? Chaos? I have a close friend with dyslexia, and she still has poor spelling and messy handwriting. But she's extremely literate and it has not kept her from achieving things.

 


My gut is the attention issue is a combination of not being that engaged with the material (getting mostly criticism for what she does, not loving her teacher, and boring material that doesn't move fast enough).  In the gifted room, she *loves* her teacher, the material moves at her pace (90% independent study), and criticism from the teacher is sandwiched in praise, making her want to do even better. 

 

That being said, the gift teacher is as baffled by the spelling and writing as the classroom teacher.  It's a separate issue, but being compounded by the iffy fit between the classroom teacher and the kid.

post #143 of 383
Thread Starter 

You know, for someone like me (or my dd), it's enough to put the less than perfect grade on the paper/assignment/test. I don't need any further negative comments, as I can obviously take it from there (as can she). But why is it so hard to find and focus on things done well?--and an earnest and true effort falls into that category for me. It can't be so hard to see when a kid is giving her best and at the least commend her for that. Seems like the connection is just not there. Any way it can be cultivated? Does the gifted teacher have any tips on connecting better with the other teacher? Bleh.

 

My dd seems to love all her non-classroom teachers. She doesn't dislike her classroom teacher, but I think she just has better times with the others. We'll see. I think I will stop in and visit with some of the others at conferences this week. Wednesday afternoon is our big day. Dh has an air show all week, so I am on my own. What's new.

post #144 of 383

Oy, Geo an Jo. Hugs. As an educator I am so completely baffled and infuriated by stories like both of yours'. Not that my kids haven't suffered in situations, but thankfully I have been able (thus far) to deal with the issues by making some kind of change (one of which was quite drastic, pulling my dd1 out of a school where bullying was happening and no one was doing anything about it).

 

Geo, here's what I think: I don't think it's unreasonable in 3rd grade (is that your dd's grade?) not to always remember to capitalize the first letter of a sentence. My dd2 still makes that error. Why is she being penalized for this? They should be doing rough drafts anyway, and then being assisted in making corrections. 

 

As far as sloppy handwriting, spelling errors, etc...I am thinking dysgraphia or some variation on that theme. She is not processing between her brain and her hands. It does not affect her literacy. But it gets scrambled somewhere on the way out. This is an identifiable LD for which she should be getting accommodations/identified. She may need some OT. It also does not preclude her giftedness; it is very, very common for kids with these issues to be extremely bright and gifted. 

 

She is suffering in the classroom not only from the actual punitive/critical corrections, but from the culture her teacher is creating in that environment that has a ripple effect on her relationships with her peers. The kids will notice their negative interactions and will respond to it in ways that won't be good for your dd. The teacher is stuck in her own mental rut, frustrated with what she sees as deficiencies and clearly unable to reframe your dd's needs in a way that can be met by an alternative educating approach. That is the teacher's failure, not your dd. I don't really know quite how you should handle it, but it should be made clear in a meeting with the teacher, the gifted teacher, the principal, and any ESE staff all together so that everyone can see the big picture. Why should her ld issues preclude her from admission to any kind of private school? Perhaps an alternative educational approach might serve her better (Montessori or similar?)? I don't know, just throwing out ideas. A culture of criticism and punitive teacher behavior will really impact her negatively in the short and long run with her educators and her peers.

 

This is my $.02. I think similarly for your ds, they are not taking a good approach to his learning needs at all. You may have to come up with an alternative plan that you want them to implement if they are receptive.

 

Jo, I'm sorry you're going through that with the kids. Online charter or k12 sounds good. Some variation on a new plan, or something. And aren't you paying good money for this school? For crying out loud, that story is ridiculous and they are not on the ball.

 

I just can't stand when people are supposed to be educators by profession and are so negative and cavalier about the children they are meant to nurture. It makes me bonkers. 

post #145 of 383
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickarolaberry View Post

Oy, Geo an Jo. Hugs. As an educator I am so completely baffled and infuriated by stories like both of yours'. Not that my kids haven't suffered in situations, but thankfully I have been able (thus far) to deal with the issues by making some kind of change (one of which was quite drastic, pulling my dd1 out of a school where bullying was happening and no one was doing anything about it).

 

Geo, here's what I think: I don't think it's unreasonable in 3rd grade (is that your dd's grade?) not to always remember to capitalize the first letter of a sentence. My dd2 still makes that error. Why is she being penalized for this? They should be doing rough drafts anyway, and then being assisted in making corrections. 

 

As far as sloppy handwriting, spelling errors, etc...I am thinking dysgraphia or some variation on that theme. She is not processing between her brain and her hands. It does not affect her literacy. But it gets scrambled somewhere on the way out. This is an identifiable LD for which she should be getting accommodations/identified. She may need some OT. It also does not preclude her giftedness; it is very, very common for kids with these issues to be extremely bright and gifted. 

 

She is suffering in the classroom not only from the actual punitive/critical corrections, but from the culture her teacher is creating in that environment that has a ripple effect on her relationships with her peers. The kids will notice their negative interactions and will respond to it in ways that won't be good for your dd. The teacher is stuck in her own mental rut, frustrated with what she sees as deficiencies and clearly unable to reframe your dd's needs in a way that can be met by an alternative educating approach. That is the teacher's failure, not your dd. I don't really know quite how you should handle it, but it should be made clear in a meeting with the teacher, the gifted teacher, the principal, and any ESE staff all together so that everyone can see the big picture. Why should her ld issues preclude her from admission to any kind of private school? Perhaps an alternative educational approach might serve her better (Montessori or similar?)? I don't know, just throwing out ideas. A culture of criticism and punitive teacher behavior will really impact her negatively in the short and long run with her educators and her peers.

 


Lots to chew on.  Thanks.  :love:

 

DD is in 4th, young for grade but in the right grade (<3 months younger than the next youngest in her class, though she is not grade skipped.)  She fails to capitalize >90% of sentences, and punctuates at about the same rate.  She appears unable to copy a word sitting right in front of her.  When she's assisted to edit, the final version gets about 80% of the errors fixed, but the result is still something that looks pretty sloppy.

 

Handwriting I think is mostly a result of poor 1st and 2nd grade instruction.  She forms the letters wrong, and when we tackle one at a time, it looks so much better.  It takes about 6 weeks of daily work for it to become automatic.  We've gotten 'f' and 'p' enough fixed that they are much, much better, suddenly improving the readability of her work.  She still turns her 'o' going the wrong direction, so that most of the remaining problems with 'b' and 'd' are things that come right on a day her 'o' goes in the right direction.  I do honestly think if we could retrain that, we'll be at an acceptable handwriting.

 

Montessori was the style instruction she had for 1st and 2nd.  We're not going back, public or private.  I toured the private, and they informed me that kids with complaints like DD's (at the time it was activity level in the room) were all ADHD kids.  It's a great fit for so many kids, but my kid, and the flavors of Montessori we have available here are not for my kid.

 

Private schools that can teach DD at her level in reading, science, and math will not take a LD kid.  I'm honestly not convinced she has a LD at the moment (admittedly based just on the fact that she doesn't really fit the descriptions of dysgraphia I find online) and I'd like to have her educated at her level and educated addressing her specific educational and emotional needs before I'll be sure that's it.  Ya know, response to intervention and all that.

 

The testing she'll take next week will kick yet another "all hands" meeting, so we'll be talking about it there.  I'm still processing anger at the teacher (she also complained that DD picks books to read that are too easy, but her sign on the wall for "just right" books defines a ceiling -- not too hard -- and not a floor.  DD was following the rules).

 

I actually think that DS will be a bit easier.  He's so far from grade level, he will continually be getting a close look and close monitoring.  I also know 10000 more now than I did when DD was in kindergarten.  They've got the district 4-12 math specialist looking at him now, who is clearly puzzled.  I will give then through December to find a plan that is mutually agreeable.  He's still content at school, which is big for me.  The decline in reading decoding is troubling, though, as I see it as a piece of his speech and language oddities.

post #146 of 383

Ah, got it. I understand.

 

So there are a couple separate issues:

 

1) Dd's need for extra help/work on specific handwriting skills.

2) Culture of intolerance/punitive etc. by the teacher in the classroom -- extending to not only what she is doing 'incorrectly' but nitpicking at everything your dd does. That's not cool. You can bet that this negative attention is not going unnoticed by your dd's peers. Boo, hiss on that teacher. She has seriously dropped the ball.

 

So for the handwriting skills, there are a few good programs out there that help, some of which are based on OT principles. I'm sure you've heard of some of them. We found that the D'Nealian style of writing worked best for my dd and the transition to cursive was way easier, plus it was easier for her to form and recognize both her mistakes and usually reversed letters. YMMV. 

 

As for the teacher, well...feh. An all hands meeting is just the beginning. I have nothing nice to say so I'm going to stop here.

post #147 of 383

Emerging from my retention portfolio production hide in a bunker week. Who decided that the best way to evaluate faculty at a university is through portfolios? blech.

 

 

 

Happy late birthday to Geofizz!!!

 

I ran twice this week. Yesterday I literally RAN out of the office, to my car to make it to my running group on time. I'm glad I did because I ran 5km in less time that it would take me to do it alone.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickarolaberry View Post
As far as sloppy handwriting, spelling errors, etc...I am thinking dysgraphia or some variation on that theme. She is not processing between her brain and her hands. It does not affect her literacy. But it gets scrambled somewhere on the way out. This is an identifiable LD for which she should be getting accommodations/identified. She may need some OT. It also does not preclude her giftedness; it is very, very common for kids with these issues to be extremely bright and gifted.

Yes. And I'll add that the definition of an LD is when the learning is out of place with the IQ.

 

 

Quote:
She is suffering in the classroom not only from the actual punitive/critical corrections, but from the culture her teacher is creating in that environment that has a ripple effect on her relationships with her peers. The kids will notice their negative interactions and will respond to it in ways that won't be good for your dd.

Yes. This.

And for a kid who likes to live in her own head it might just make it even harder to fit in.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geofizz View Post She appears unable to copy a word sitting right in front of her. 

.


This screams undiagnosed LD to me.  Which gives me hope that someone's worked out a strategy. What's the ed dept/psych dept. like on Big State U's campus? Can you call someone over there to help you navigate all this? Even if you pay out of pocket for evals and stuff. 

 

 

We meet with teachers next week, but I can see dd1's report card electronically. It reads (all 6 lines of it) just like I would expect it to. :)

 

And now. off for an afternoon of ?

 

 

post #148 of 383
Quote:
Originally Posted by kerc View Post

Yes. And I'll add that the definition of an LD is when the learning is out of place with the IQ.


Not according to this state's department of education's interpretation of IDEA.  I've been down that road -- 5 standard deviations spread in performance does not qualify for services if the lowest score is still within 1 sigma of average.

 

Thanks for the venting and thinking space.

 

RR:  My RP announced were doing Turkey Trot 5 miler in 45 minutes.  Speed work last night left me gasping.  Slower run tonight.

post #149 of 383
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geofizz View Post


Not according to this state's department of education's interpretation of IDEA.  I've been down that road -- 5 standard deviations spread in performance does not qualify for services if the lowest score is still within 1 sigma of average.

 

BUT ... take the numbers out of the picture. If this is a recognized LD in most instances, then maybe through diagnosis there's some studies on how to overcome/cope with it. So say you do push evaluation. They come back and say "nope. can't service her because she doesn't meet the number."  You can find someone who CAN. It means you'll have to pay for it, but then your kid makes progress. Not that any of us want for our kid to have more to do after school. I have a friend who has a college sophomore with a new diagnosis of ADHD. He's bright enough that he made it through high school with no one recognizing it, but did HORRIBLY in his first year in college. Now he's learning new coping mechanisms and doing MUCH MUCH better and feeling more successful. (Don't work in a study lounge or coffee shop if you're stimulated by hearing things. Simple solution for him -- find the top of the library tower). In K's case it might be more, but it might not be.

post #150 of 383

Geo - oh, that makes me so sad about the criticism issue.  As a doc, I can't tell you how many times I see these defeated, sad kids in the office - they can't get any positive feedback and they just give up.  Why should she try to do better for this teacher if the teacher doesn't help her feel good about it?  Can your ped, or the school guidance counselor, or even an independent psych consult (not that I think dd in any way needs psych, just as someone who could be an advocate) document that she responds better to praise and positive re-inforcement?  I know you personally focus on positive reinforcement - can you think of a positive system for some of the writing difficulties?  Can she treat capitalization like a word search puzzle - circling and tallying every capital letter or something?  Will the gifted teacher make some recommendations about what she does that engages dd?  Ugh. 

 

Shantimama - please go to the doctor and get tested for pertussis!  In adults, it causes prolonged cough - sometimes so much cough that you can break a rib.  Or, as tjsmama says, maybe you need treatment for asthma exacerbation.  Anyway - this is too long to feel bad.

 

Running group end of season banquet tonight!  Looking forward to hanging with my real life running peeps!

post #151 of 383
Geo--good luck with the school stuff. What Nic said sounded brilliant.

1jooj--that sounds awful for your son. I hope you can find a good solution elsewhere.

kerc--hope you have an enjoyable afternoon (and that if it includes work, it's the good kind).

tjsmama--field trips are definitely not my thing. Kudos to you for managing them.

Loving the term Dongo, btw. innocent.gif

RR: School pick-up run. Managed to fit the violin and backpack under the stroller, which was in itself an impressive feat.

NRR: Crazy week. J caught the croup, so we've been dealing with that since Tuesday night. She had a better night on Wednesday but not so much last night and still sounds really hoarse. I took her to the doctor and they thought she sounded fine, so hopefully that's true. We're supposed to have a babysitter over tonight while we go to an alumni event downtown (from our alma mater, not where we teach, though ironically, the current president of our alma mater used to be the provost at the university where DH teaches). I'm hoping that will all be ok. Our babysitter's mom is supposed to get out of the hospital today after having had a pacemaker put in (and she's only 50, which is just crazy) and between that situation and J it's a little concerning. We're going to pony up the $10 for valet parking so we can at least get home quickly if need be.

Meanwhile, yesterday was the all-school field trip to hear the Colorado Symphony Orchestra play. We filled up nine buses, between parents and students (all parents can come along, so there's more than one finds on a usual field trip). DH met us there (which I would have done if I'd realized how much longer it would take via school bus; my campus is literally across from the Performing Arts Center so I can park for cheap in the parking lot three blocks away). It was a great concert and apparently we're one of the few schools to bring all of our students. We filled up the main concert hall section and then some, which was pretty cool (the other students were various classes from some the Cherry Creek district, which is a very wealthy area that's probably not having even half the budget problems that we are, and they aren't bringing all their students...). Our PTA funds this trip for the most part, and it's such a great experience for the kids.

ETA: Mama needs a vacation. I've managed to yell at both my kids today for things outside their control (like being whiny and wanting to nurse 24/7 and kicking me the whole time she does) bag.gif and had a migraine that took me down last night. I'm feeling even worse about the yelling now that I realized J is 20 months old today. Could you send good vibes for a peaceful and refreshing weekend please? greensad.gif
post #152 of 383
Geo~Blech. greensad.gif I wish I had some words of wisdom, but all I can do is send love and support. hug.gif

real~Be gentle on yourself, mama. Whiny and kicking are not things that are out of their control, IMO. And we all have those days.

I got to sleep in again this morning (for real, this time...no dog wake-up at 5 am) and it was SO nice. I had a relaxing morning, then went to my favorite noon spin/pilates class that I haven't been able to get to for probably a year. Ran a few errands, picked up my packet for tomorrow's race, then back home where I cleaned out my email inbox and got caught up on a bunch of stuff. My clothes and shoes are laid out for tomorrow, and I guess I'm ready-ish. yikes.gif I am just a teeny bit terrified about this race. Ok, a lot terrified. I have never run a trail race before, let alone a 1/2 marathon. WHY did I think this was a good idea??? Here's hoping I finish under 3 hours...
post #153 of 383

I'm loving the term Dongo, hahah.

 

Real~My dd is 21 months old so I can TOTALLY relate. I agree with TJ's mama that whiny and kicking aren't things that are out of their control. Being overtired or under-stimulated (like on rainy days like today when we're stuck cooped up in the apartment) are out of her control, but whining and hurting mama while nursing are not. I hate to admit that I lose my patience with dd more than I ought to and sometimes I yell. I've even swatted her (diapered) bottom recently on a particularly bad day (and immediately felt HORRIBLE. Worst mother ever.) I don't even have the excuse of other kids to take care of. This stage of toddlerhood is TOUGH and I feel for you.

 

TJsmama~OMG a half trail run? Exciting! Trails look like a lot of fun, I hope you go out there and enjoy yourself! and post pictures here! I think I might become a trail convert soon due to you dingos. Thanks for the ITband info. That does sound exactly like what I'm feeling. I don't have a foam roller yet, but I've been jamming tennis balls into my right glute and it seems to help a bit. Off to amazon now to see what I can find.

 

Bec~I've definitely been considering a chiro, but I feel a bit overwhelmed trying to chose one. Any pointers to finding a good doc vs a quackopractor?

 

RR--about to go to packet pickup this afternoon for tomorrow's 10k. I think I'm leaning toward giving into my competitive side and trying to beat my last 10k time, even if by mere seconds. Two days ago DH and I ran 4 miles in 34 minutes and it felt great. So if I can keep that pace up for two more miles I'll be stoked. Hopefully the rain holds off, because we don't have a rain shield for the jogger. Thinking of going out for an easy slow 2-3 miles this afternoon to shake out the nerves, if it doesn't start raining again.

post #154 of 383

Geo, good luck with the speedy turkey trot. And duh.gif about the teacher. Nic is wise in her comments about the nitpicking and intolerance of the teacher. I hate teachers that bully. I truly believe that the culture of bullying often starts with autocratic and unhelpful teachers, and then trickles down.

 

kitteh and real, big toddler mama grouphug.gif. I truly believe that between one and two is the absolute hardest part of parenting so far. And of breastfeeding, too. Now that I'm nursing a two year old I feel so grateful that she understands to respect my breasts and my body, and has so many more coping mechanisms with the challenges of the toddler world than always deferring to nursing. I may sound like Dan Savage, but it truly gets better.

 

gaye and kitteh- good luck tomorrow!! Have fun!

 

real, have fun at the alumni event. I hope the babysitting all works out.

 

NRR- This is my first night alone in over six years. I've had a couple of nights away from the kids with my husband, but never been alone. I took them to their aunt & uncle's for an overnight. My original plan had been to get a ton of stuff done today (studying, working on grad school apps, etc.) and maybe go out for a bit tonight, but I've been smacked by a mysterious illness. Both kids have had colds and I went to bed with a scratchy throat last night (after a totally exhausting two hour conversation with my middle sister who is pregnant and planning a VBAC and possibly getting her care transferred from her midwives to an OB). This morning the kids woke up just after 5, and I felt miserable and achy and sent them downstairs to watch tv. When they asked me to get up and make breakfast about 30 minutes later, I made it to the bottom of the stairs before feeling dizzy and losing vision and lying down on the floor to try not to faint. I then dragged myself through making breakfast alternating between lying on the kitchen floor and standing for no more than a minute. I did review how to call for help with the oldest, in case I fainted or fell. After eating and drinking a lot of water and lying on the couch I felt better, and convinced the kids to play while I when back upstairs and half-napped for another hour. Following that I felt less woozy, managed to get the kids packed, run to the grocery store to get a couple things they needed for their overnight (almost needed to sit down in the line up, but luckily made it through), and drove the kids to the aunt and uncle's house. My whole body ached, but sitting for driving didn't make me dizzy- only standing. I got home around 1, and went to bed and slept for three hours!! I feel so much better now- I think it's a combination of exhaustion and a cold/flu.

 

RR- After all of the drama with the illness, I knew that my hour a day goal for the week was blown. But I did get out for a really short (20 minutes?- forgot to hit start on my watch) run this evening. Fingers crossed that I'll feel ready for a longer one tomorrow. I'm also planning a week of healthy eating- nothing drastic, but keeping it simple with fruits & veggies, seafood, eggs, beans and nuts. Not so different from my usual diet, except for omitting the rice, goat cheese and lately the leftover hallowe'en candy. (And no, the diet changes aren't the cause of the illness, since I didn't start until this morning).

post #155 of 383
Feel better, melW!

kitteh~Good luck tomorrow! And if you haven't already bought a roller off of Amazon, you can find them at Target (near the yoga mats and that kind of stuff), most sporting goods stores, and of course, running specialty stores. Faster than waiting for shipping! I was having fantasies about mine around mile 11 today...

Um, yeah. That was HARD. bag.gif Not like I thought it would be easy, but it was way harder than I thought it would be! My strategy was to walk the uphills and run the flats/downhills. Which was all well and good, except that there were WAY more uphills than I anticipated. The race started out uphill, but fairly gentle and runnable; the first mile+ was on pavement before we headed off onto the trails. The first half was not really that great. It was trail, but kind of running through fields and along a road, so not fun trail, kwim? At one point, no joke, we were running through a field with pretty much NO trail whatsoever, just running through grass, with some very, very faint tire tracks showing the way. It was pretty much all uphill from miles 3-7, which I did not enjoy. But, my friend Amy met me around mile 7 and ran with me for about 3/4 mile, which was awesome because I was dying! After she headed back to her house (she lives literally across the street from the start/finish line!), we turned and headed downhill. Which was fantastic, except that the trail was muddy and snowy/icy in spots so we couldn't really go that fast and make up much time. But still, awesome to be going downhill! And, this is the part of the trail that I've run before and love. I probably would have enjoyed it more if I hadn't been in so much pain, though! orngbiggrin.gif Of course, what goes down, must come back up, so we had another 2-ish miles of uphill before finally making the last downhill back toward the finish for the last 2 miles. Here's the really cruel part, though...we came into the park where the start/finish line was and had to make a loop around the park before finishing and ended up going STRAIGHT UPHILL to the finish line! No joke! It was ridiculous!!! Nonetheless, I finished, and I'm proud of myself. I was NOT trained enough for this. My ultimate goal was to finish under 3 hours, which I did. I think if I had been in better shape, I could have easily finished closer to 2:30. Official time was 2:50:18. At least it wasn't my slowest half ever...that honor still belongs to this year's half-ironman. orngtongue.gif

The best part? Going out to brunch with my friend Amy afterward and having a super tasty drink and the BEST EGGS BENEDICT EVER. Because I earned it! orngbiggrin.gif
post #156 of 383

Geo, full empathy for your daughter. I hated school for a few years because of a teacher in junior school. He knocked my already teetering confidence and I became too afraid to try in case I failed doing my best. But others have offered really wise words. I think that if your DD meets the spirit of the criteria for a diagnosis then at least you're perhaps one step closer to finding a solution even if the label doesn't strictly fit.

 

Gaye, super impressed that you took on the crazy race! Nice work, mama.

 

Real, oof, it really sounds as though you could do with a serious rest. Hoping that's in your very near future. And news on the job front?

 

Just a brief hello. My dad is doing so much better, thankfully, and so this is one bit of good news. Unfortunately I had a really unpleasant reaction to the anesthesia on Tues and spent two days in bed, then on Friday, just when I am feeling somewhat human after weeks and weeks of severe sickness, I started passing huge (HUGE) clots and gushing blood. I ended up at the ER last night and had somewhat of an emergency D and C. I was discharged this morning and no awful side effects so far. I feel as low as I ever have.  I've been pregnant for 5 months with a few weeks in between pregnancies and in that time I have become so woefully behind at work, I've lost any semblance of fitness, and I now feel so totally indifferent to it all. I am trying to dig myself out by making plans, trying to engage in anything, but I feel passionate-less. I know that I will one day feel better and more hopeful but that promise doesn't give me a drop of comfort at the moment.

post #157 of 383
MelW--hope you are feeling better soon. How miserable, especially with so much planned.

kitteh--good luck!

tjsmama--congrats for finishing it! A trail half is tough. I did one in Kremmling once that included running up the Kremmling cliffs and was proud that I didn't come in last. It had a small field; I was fourth from last out of probably 15-20 runners, most of whom actually lived in the area. Also, I'd started dead last due to a series of snafus that morning, so finishing fourth from last meant I'd passed three people. lol.gif

zub-- greensad.gif I really hope this weekend brings healing for you.

I'm a Dongo today but hoping for a nice long run tomorrow. The day was filled with one child or another screaming, though most of it came from the soon-to-be 7yo. eyesroll.gif For reasons I don't pretend to understand, the month before her birthday is as miserable as all get-out. And I'm definitely in a funk, which is helping none of the above.

No word on the job front yet. I doubt I'll hear much until after Thanksgiving.
post #158 of 383
Thread Starter 

MelW, I think your bout sounds scary, and I hope you're well with some rest.

 

Gaye, that sounds really, really hard. Way to finish it!

 

Zub, I am glad your father is doing better. What a relief. Now, mama, you're next.

 

Just fed dh and sent him off to the airshow, where he's spending every day this week for work. I'm feeling blue. We got a counter offer from the company. They dropped the price but not as low as we'd like, and dh's first reaction was to scoff, but I'm thinking this means they are amenable to negotiations, and the sheer process eats time, which means we can counter with a new closing date and keep the dance going. For once, I don't feel totally freaked by the process, and dh is being a jerk about it. I've been melting down again daily (I should really put it on a calendar and see how it graphs out with hormones), and during this AM's meltdown he said maybe we should counter their counter. And I'm like, duh. Anyway, I'm going to send a note today to the people with the job to tell them where they can put it hide.gif but in a nicer way, and I think I am going to meet an acquaintance out at the giant Chinese mall, where I can look for a cheap dress and also have some bubble tea. Five weeks to our vacation, and then I have a two-month event of visitors. And THAT will definitely keep me busy.

 

But before I do anything, I am heading down to the beach with an ipod and a water bottle to see what happens.

post #159 of 383

Gaye jumpers.gif Awesome trail half!! I really think that race organizers should make sure that they finish on a flat or downhill, though (even if it means flipping the whole circuit around...).

 

zub, oh what a long and drawn out loss. I hope you get some rest and some healing soon. Lots of big virtual hugs headed your way grouphug.gif

 

Well, despite a three hour nap, I'm headed to bed at 9:30. Whatever this is, it's kicking my butt. I did get a bit of work done, but I think the universe is giving my workaholic self a pretty strong message to take it easy. (As a good friend of mine says, sometimes the universe whispers, but if you don't listen sometimes it hits you with a 2x4- I'm not sure if this is the 2x4 or not, but it hurts enough to get me into bed in case a bigger hit is coming lol.gif)

post #160 of 383

Gaye ~ great job on the trail 1/2.  All those hills!  Yikes!

 

MelW ~ I hope you're feeling better this morning.  What a bummer to have a night all to yourself and not want to do anything other than sleep.

 

zub ~ grouphug.gif I pray this whole ordeal ends quickly for you.  Healing thoughts, coming your way.

 

Geo ~ the school situation sounds tremendously frustrating.  You're being so pro-active about it though.  Your kids are lucky to have you for a Mama smile.gif.

 

jooj ~ so, what happened? twins.gif Did the iPod and water bottle see any action at the beach?!

 

kitteh ~ oh dear, the toddler days are difficult.  Sending you patience goodvibes.gif

 

RR (more like no-RR) ~ sigh....  Not running has had significant improvement in knee pain, and significant decline in my mood.  A difficult place to be in, deciding between sanity and pain.  I'm running this morning though, because I just hate the way I feel right now and need to run.  Seriously, need it.

 

NRR ~ DH and I had a nice date night last night.  The kids all went to Parents Night Out at the gymnastics gym and we went out for dinner, bought DH new jeans, and sat in the car and just talked.  He is a good, good man love.gif.

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