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November Book Challenge

post #1 of 56
Thread Starter 

Cited from Cathe winky.gif (who originally cited it from NewCrunchyDaddy):

 

 

So, just by way of clarification (for comers both new and old), new and improved guidelines for the Book Challenge Thread are as follows:


1) Post the books you read ... or not
2) Post a recommendation ... or not
3) Number your book ... or not
4) Make a goal for how many books you want to read in 2011 ... or not
5) Have fun with books (This one, unfortunately, is MANDATORY

 

Happy reading everyone!

 


Edited by Holland73 - 11/6/11 at 3:10pm
post #2 of 56
Thread Starter 

Stolen by Lucy Christopher

 

16 year old Gemma is stolen from a Bangkok airport by 24-25 year old Ty, who had been stalking Gemma since she was 10 years old. 

 

The story is written as a letter to Ty from Gemma.  There are really 4 main characters in Stolen:  Gemma, Ty, the Australian desert & a beautiful camel.  Stockholm Syndrome is a big component in the story, but strangely enough, I found myself experiencing Stockholm Syndrome as I also fell in love with Ty.  This story gripped me immediately and I couldn't put it down.  It was so engrossing that I finished it in one sitting. 

post #3 of 56

57) Double Dexter  by Jeff Lindsay

 

This was a little break from One Hundred Years of Solitude  by Gabriel García Márquez. I am really struggling through the book. I enjoy the characters and the beautiful story, but it is just tough to get through it. I think all the of the generational layers are overwhelming and hard for me to keep straight. I will finish it though.

post #4 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Igraine View Post

57) Double Dexter  by Jeff Lindsay

 

This was a little break from One Hundred Years of Solitude  by Gabriel García Márquez. I am really struggling through the book. I enjoy the characters and the beautiful story, but it is just tough to get through it. I think all the of the generational layers are overwhelming and hard for me to keep straight. I will finish it though.


I had a friend recently give this book 1 star on goodreads.  She is a big reader I respect, and she just didn't like it.  Don't feel bad if you just want to drop it.  Nancy Pearl says life is too short to read books you're not enjoying :)

 

 

 

 

Holland, thanks for starting the new thread! :)

 

 

I'll have books to post soon!

 

post #5 of 56

Thanks for starting the thread . . . and I see you cited me . . . but actually, I stole the opening post from NewCrunchyDaddy!

 

 

post #6 of 56

How to Save a Life by Sara Zarr

 

 

Sara Zarr is one of my favorite teen lit writers . . . right up there with Jay Asher and Laurie Halse Anderson . . . so I eagerly opened her newest novel expecting greatness. And that's exactly what I got!
 
The book alternates between the two main characters: Mandy, a pregnant teen hoping for a better life for her baby; and Jill--angry and devastated by the death of her father. They were both so heartbreakingly real. And the secondary characters were equally as well-drawn. This was just one of those perfect books--I couldn't wait to find out what was going to happen, but at the same time, I didn't want it to end.
 
I highly recommend this book to teen and adult women.
post #7 of 56

I just read Invasion : A C.H.A.O.S. Novel by Jon S. Lewis which I got for free to review from booksneeze.  I really enjoyed it a lot and am going to give it to my 12 year old son to read.  I am currently reading A Love That Multiplies , by Jim Bob Duggar  and am enjoying it - I don't watch their show - but have seen some episodes years ago, and I read their other book and liked it. 

post #8 of 56

The Hummingbird’s Daughter by Luis Alberto Urrea

This is a marvellous book that I would recommend to everyone who:

Is a fan of Magical Realism

Is interested in Mexican History

Is intrigued by Catholic sainthood

and “curanderas” or medicine women

It was not a book that I immediately wanted to re-read for parts of it, like descriptions of the poverty, were very difficult, but it is a book I will definitely read again.   Based on the Life of Teresa Urrea, who was a real person and was the great aunt of the author, Urrea spent 20 years writing this novel and researching the life of this remarkable woman who is revered as a saint although she was never canonized by the church.

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/91289.The_Hummingbird_s_Daughter

 

The mystery of the green ink again!       It only happens in this forum. Could it be because I am pasting the link from Goodreads?


Edited by raksmama - 11/7/11 at 11:55am
post #9 of 56
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post

Thanks for starting the thread . . . and I see you cited me . . . but actually, I stole the opening post from NewCrunchyDaddy!

 

 

 

Ok, I edited my post to make sure you both get kudos.  lol.gif

 

post #10 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post

How to Save a Life by Sara Zarr

 

 

Sara Zarr is one of my favorite teen lit writers . . . right up there with Jay Asher and Laurie Halse Anderson . . . so I eagerly opened her newest novel expecting greatness. And that's exactly what I got!
 
The book alternates between the two main characters: Mandy, a pregnant teen hoping for a better life for her baby; and Jill--angry and devastated by the death of her father. They were both so heartbreakingly real. And the secondary characters were equally as well-drawn. This was just one of those perfect books--I couldn't wait to find out what was going to happen, but at the same time, I didn't want it to end.
 
I highly recommend this book to teen and adult women.


 

Oh, that sounds good!  I'm so glad to have your opinion on books from the YA category Cathe.  I have a feeling both my kids will be voracious readers and we'll be needing many suggestions thumb.gif
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by raksmama View Post

The Hummingbird’s Daughter by Luis Alberto Urrea

This is a marvellous book that I would recommend to everyone who:

Is a fan of Magical Realism

Is interested in Mexican History

Is intrigued by Catholic sainthood

and “curanderas” or medicine women

It was not a book that I immediately wanted to re-read for parts of it, like descriptions of the poverty, were very difficult, but it is a book I will definitely read again.   Based on the Life of Teresa Urrea, who was a real person and was the great aunt of the author, Urrea spent 20 years writing this novel and researching the life of this remarkable woman who is revered as a saint although she was never canonized by the church.

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/91289.The_Hummingbird_s_Daughter

 

The mystery of the green ink again!       It only happens in this forum. Could it be because I am pasting the link from Goodreads?



I loved that book orngbiggrin.gif

 

And re: the green ink, maybe it is b/c you are copy/pasting....?

post #11 of 56

LOL!


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Holland73 View Post

 

Ok, I edited my post to make sure you both get kudos.  lol.gif

 



 

post #12 of 56

The Story of Beautiful Girl

 

 

Quote:
It is 1968. Lynnie, a young white woman with a developmental disability, and Homan, an African American deaf man, are locked away in an institution, the School for the Incurable and Feebleminded, and have been left to languish, forgotten. Deeply in love, they escape, and find refuge in the farmhouse of Martha, a retired schoolteacher and widow. But the couple is not alone-Lynnie has just given birth to a baby girl. When the authorities catch up to them that same night, Homan escapes into the darkness, and Lynnie is caught. But before she is forced back into the institution, she whispers two words to Martha: "Hide her." And so begins the 40-year epic journey of Lynnie, Homan, Martha, and baby Julia-lives divided by seemingly insurmountable obstacles, yet drawn together by a secret pact and extraordinary love.

 

I really enjoyed this book.  It's not easy to read at times, but the strength and resiliency of the characters is truly remarkable, as is the love that was shared between the characters.

 

 

Fablehaven: Rise of the Evening Star

 

 

Quote:
At the end of the school year, Kendra and her brother Seth find themselves racing back to Fablehaven, a refuge for mythical and magical creatures. Grandpa Sorenson, the caretaker, invites three specialists -- a potion master, a magical relics collector, and a mystical creature trapper -- to help protect the property from the Society of the Evening Star, an ancient organization determined to infiltrate the preserve and steal a hidden artifact of great power. Time is running out. The Evening Star is storming the gates. If the artifact falls into the wrong hands, it could mean the downfall of other preserves and possibly the world. Will Kendra learn to use her fairy gifts in time? Will Seth stay out of trouble?
 

 

 

It's always surprising to me that this isn't a more popular YA fantasy series -- it's well-written, adventurous, and magical.

post #13 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by kofduke View Post

The Story of Beautiful Girl

 

 

 

I really enjoyed this book.  It's not easy to read at times, but the strength and resiliency of the characters is truly remarkable, as is the love that was shared between the characters.

 

 

Fablehaven: Rise of the Evening Star

 

 

 

 

It's always surprising to me that this isn't a more popular YA fantasy series -- it's well-written, adventurous, and magical.


Fablehaven series is on my daughter's to-read list :)

 

post #14 of 56

Oh good people of the book thread, do some of you remember when we a bunch of us read The Book of Lost of Things by John Connolly?  I see he has written some other books but I wasn't sure which one to pick.  Anyone have an opinion?  Also, if you've read American Gods by Neil Gaiman, which would you read next?

post #15 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post

Also, if you've read American Gods by Neil Gaiman, which would you read next?


In terms of Gaiman, I'd recommend his short fiction anthology Fragile Things (HERE) which, among other things, has a great Sherlock Holmes story and another story in the American Gods universe that stars Shadow.

 

post #16 of 56

The 39 Clues: Cahills vs. Vespers Book 1 The Medusa Plot by Gordon Korman

 

Dan and Amy Cahill thought their adventures were over and life would return to normal after they solved the 39 clues in the first series of books . . . until members of the Cahill family all over the world disappear and their kidnappers give Amy and Dan just a few days to fulfill the ransom request. The clock is ticking as problem after problem threatens to keep them from meeting the kidnappers demands.

I hadn't read the first 39 Clues series and, while I think it would have helped me to understand the characters a bit better, I was still able to enjoy this book and understand what was happening. This is book is heavy on the plot - - - sort of a DaVinci Code for kids. As I was trying to think of a book I could compare this to for my students and I came up with Swindle--another story of an elaborate heist pulled off by kids, and also by author Gordon Korman. 

For 4-6 graders who like a lot of action and excitement, this is a great choice.

post #17 of 56
Thread Starter 

Perfect by Ellen Hopkins

 

It's not necessarily a sequel to Hopkins' Impulse, more like a companion, as it integrates Impulse's characters with those in Perfect.  Four high school students - one of which is the sister of Connor from Impulse - and their varied attempts at being perfect.

 

What an absolutely amazing book!  Impulse is one of my all-time favorites and I also loved Connor's character, so initially I was hesitant to read Perfect.  But, reading Perfect was just extra icing on an already beautiful cake.   

post #18 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post


In terms of Gaiman, I'd recommend his short fiction anthology Fragile Things (HERE) which, among other things, has a great Sherlock Holmes story and another story in the American Gods universe that stars Shadow.

 



Thanks NCD biggrinbounce.gif   I'm almost done with Charity Girl by Michael Lowenthal, which is pretty good.  I've got a couple other books hanging out on the nightstand, but I think that one is next.  Love Neil Gaiman.

post #19 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post



Thanks NCD biggrinbounce.gif



You're welcome.  It's a great anthology ... if you get the audio edition, he reads them himself.

post #20 of 56


I understand that Anansi Boys is the follow up of American Gods. it is on the  Endicott Mythic Fiction Reading List which I am sure a lot of you would love.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post Also, if you've read American Gods by Neil Gaiman, which would you read next?


 

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