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Our Daily Bread - Page 2

post #21 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchensqueen View Post

 


Have you tried rising in an oiled bowl covered with a kitchen towel on top of the stove while your oven is running for other things? I'm rising a loaf of half rye just now while chocolate chip cookies bake, and it's rising in record time. I also use a heated bowl to rise in - just rinse it with the hottest water you can stand to warm it, then wipe the water out well. 

 

I hope my half rye turns out. I love the pain d'epi recipe so much I want to make it my house bread, so I've decided to try using it in all the kinds of bread we like. I've substituted half of the bread flour with dark rye. I'm thinking I'll just shape it into four basic batons. It's on the first rise now, and I'll let it go another rise, and maybe a third if I've got the time. I really want to develop the gluten and flavor. I wanted to do five rises on it (since rye is so dense) but I didn't make the time to get it going this morning. Oh well, I'll let everyone know how it turns out. 

 


The loaf that I was worried about when I posted was set to rise on the back of the stovetop, in a heavy Dutch oven. I think I was upset because I really hoped that spot would work - it seemed warm enough. I warmed up the Dutch oven too. I think it's the same problem as the top of the refrigerator - it's drafty, so the temperature is inconsistent. It's a small kitchen and the stove is only a few feet from the door outside to the driveway. It's in a direct line of fire for the initial blast of cold whenever the door is opened. 

 

 

I'm debating whether to buy an electric blanket, but I'd prefer a more energy-efficient, greener solution. After all, one of the causal factors for this situation is our decision to keep the thermostat low.  

 

We've only lived in this house a couple of years, so it's only been a couple of winters that I've had to deal with this challenge. I'll mostly just avoid the problem by baking bread earlier in the day. Or maybe I'll finally give the no-knead bread a try, I've had the recipe for ages. 

 

I hope the rye bread worked out, it sounds delicious. My kids aren't fond of rye, so I don't use it, but I like it. Their idea of a treat is a nice loaf of plain white bread, because they get it so rarely, lol! 

 

 

 

 

post #22 of 120

How about some of the tricks for keeping fermenting yogurt warm?  If you have an ice chest big enough to hold your bowl (or can improvise something other than a bowl), a few jars of boiling water set in the bottom of the ice chest around the bowl, close the lid and walk away.  A heating pad under the bowl, wrapping the whole thing in a towel.  Or if you have a microwave, a rice heating pad heated in the microwave a few minutes set under the bowl and wrapped in a towel uses less electricity.  I spent years trying to figure these things out for this freezing house, since we only had central heat installed last spring, after 12 years in the house.  Winter was always interesting. 

 

Don't suppose you have a fireplace? 

post #23 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post

How about some of the tricks for keeping fermenting yogurt warm?  If you have an ice chest big enough to hold your bowl (or can improvise something other than a bowl), a few jars of boiling water set in the bottom of the ice chest around the bowl, close the lid and walk away.  A heating pad under the bowl, wrapping the whole thing in a towel.  Or if you have a microwave, a rice heating pad heated in the microwave a few minutes set under the bowl and wrapped in a towel uses less electricity.  I spent years trying to figure these things out for this freezing house, since we only had central heat installed last spring, after 12 years in the house.  Winter was always interesting. 

 

Don't suppose you have a fireplace? 


Funny, my last couple of batches of yoghurt turned out badly too...... In the summer, I just let it sit, wrapped in heavy towels, on the counter overnight. At least I can move my yoghurt-making into the oven overnight without any competing demands for the space. 

 

The ice chest is a good idea. I have a Coleman cooler, although right now it holds the overflow of pantry goods - different sacs of flour and cornmeal and oats etc. I can empty it out and try to find a different place for them. Again, it's the curse of the tiny kitchen  orngtongue.gif

 

We do have a fireplace, but we don't use it because it doesn't have a screen and we don't have the "utensils". When we moved in, I thought we'd be here for one winter, so we didn't bother buying all that stuff. Now that we are likely to be here for another one, I think I can justify getting them, right? I love sitting in front of a good fire during the winter. (Must remember to check the chimney first!) 

 

Thanks for all of the suggestions! 

 

post #24 of 120
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post

The loaf that I was worried about when I posted was set to rise on the back of the stovetop, in a heavy Dutch oven. I think I was upset because I really hoped that spot would work - it seemed warm enough. I warmed up the Dutch oven too. I think it's the same problem as the top of the refrigerator - it's drafty, so the temperature is inconsistent. It's a small kitchen and the stove is only a few feet from the door outside to the driveway. It's in a direct line of fire for the initial blast of cold whenever the door is opened. 

 

I'm debating whether to buy an electric blanket, but I'd prefer a more energy-efficient, greener solution. After all, one of the causal factors for this situation is our decision to keep the thermostat low.  

 

We've only lived in this house a couple of years, so it's only been a couple of winters that I've had to deal with this challenge. I'll mostly just avoid the problem by baking bread earlier in the day. Or maybe I'll finally give the no-knead bread a try, I've had the recipe for ages. 

 

I hope the rye bread worked out, it sounds delicious. My kids aren't fond of rye, so I don't use it, but I like it. Their idea of a treat is a nice loaf of plain white bread, because they get it so rarely, lol! 


Meh, that sucks. Instead of buying an electric blanket, do you have a heating pad? Or maybe just use some warm towels straight from the dryer? 

 

The rye was amazing. I'm just loving this base recipe I'm using now. I feel like I can do anything with it. It didn't turn out overwhelmingly of rye since I cut it with half white flour so it would get a good rise. It was soft and amazing - I think it'll be great for sandwiches. I just love ham and spicy mustard on rye bread. The only thing I'll add to it next time will be some caraway - it needed a little kick, and I think caraway is just the ticket. 

 

Today I've got to do the pumpkin crescent dinner rolls. I never did a trial run on them, so hopefully they turn out well since that's the dinner roll I plan on serving tomorrow for Thanksgiving. If not, I suppose I could do my stand by bread and just shape into rolls. I've got pies going currently - did a chocolate icebox and just pulled pumpkin out of the oven. After lunch I've got to put a shoofly in, then the oven will be free for the rolls. 

 

post #25 of 120

I use this recipe. It is a simple recipe that takes almost no time from our days. We can make bread daily, or every other day, or several times a day. Four ingredients and no kneading: it's perfect for a family as busy as we are.

 

Oh, and because it sits for days, it has a mild sourdough flavor and never has trouble raising (a problem we have here, as well).

post #26 of 120

 

I decided to try a new recipe for a holiday bread each week leading up to Christmas. This week it was Finnish Pulla.

 

I wasn't entirely happy with the results, although the cardamom flavour was awesome. I would be happy to post the recipe (which I clipped from a magazine many years ago, but never tried) if anyone wants it. I'm hoping someone has a "tried and true" version that they'd be willing to share instead. I'm pretty sure I know what to tweak in the recipe I have, but I'd rather spend my time on something more reliable. Thanks!! 

 

Next, if I can find dried pears, I'm going to make Swiss Birnbrot. 

post #27 of 120

Well, what's Pulla and what makes it different?  What didn't you care for about it? 

 

I have a Cardamom bread recipe that I've used with good results before.  It's a holiday bread, but I want to say it's Easter and not Christmas, although I may be mistaken.  I'll double check. 

post #28 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post

Well, what's Pulla and what makes it different?  What didn't you care for about it? 

 

I have a Cardamom bread recipe that I've used with good results before.  It's a holiday bread, but I want to say it's Easter and not Christmas, although I may be mistaken.  I'll double check. 



Thanks for responding  smile.gif.  Pulla is a sweet bread similar to brioche, with milk, eggs, and butter in the dough, and flavoured with cardamom. I was hoping that someone would offer up great-grandma's tested and true recipe. I have not been to Finland, so it may be popular at Easter, but the recipe I have talks about Christmas. I wouldn't be surprised if it's a popular treat anytime of year in Finland, it's certainly tasty enough. 

 

The recipe I used was out of a magazine, and it had a very short first rise. I was a little suspicious, but decided to follow the directions anyway. The loaf was a little heavy and the crumb wasn't very good, at least, not compared to a brioche, which is what I was expecting. 

 

 

 

 

post #29 of 120
Let's see . . . Mixed up my firSt batch of rye (half rye I guess tho I thought all rye had some wheat in it so it would rise?), used warm leftover coffee for the liquid in the recipe and caraway seeds . . .yum! Very wet dough, though I used my regular recipe just subbing the rye flour and coffee, not sure why so wet.

Made half into a peasant loaf for dinner night before last and then the rest into hamburger buns tonight-- my first rolls/buns! I have to say, I really like rye for buns! Because the dough was so moist, I think I shoulda baked slower and lower as they were a little doughy in middle, rose up real nice, though!

So I managed to score local AP flour for 25# for $12! Can you believe it? Not organic or ww, but still, local flour cheap! I am figuring out how to cut in some bran/germ and maybe sunflower seeds ground to kinda lift up the nutritional profile, and I will supplement that big supply with organic whole wheat when I mx up recipes. Without counting the cost of yeast or salt, it will be $1.50 for four 2.5# loaves based on the recipe I use now. Take that, Oroweat!

I don't need to mix up dough for a little while since I still ave my freezer stash of sammich loaves ready to thaw and rise. Which is goid coz I'm plenty busy right now. For me, I really think the most sustainable way to f it baking all our bread products into my life is to have a major date with my mixer 1-2x/month and then store/freeze everything til needed. I am definitely going to try to keep a stash of cookies and sammich loaves nd one round for piza at all times, what a life saver redface.gif
post #30 of 120

CMH - not all rye has wheat in it.  Russian black bread/dark rye when made traditionally is made with a rye starter with all dark rye flour.  It's a very heavy dense bread, unlike anything you'll find in a regular grocery store.  I love it.  Nothing else compares.

 

OOF - I was wrong, it is in fact a Xmas loaf.  Called Swedish Cardamom Wreath, although I believe I just made a braided loaf last time - I don't like dealing with storing wreaths.  I'm going to abbreviate the steps, since i don't feel like typing out the whole thing (half a page).

 

1 pkg yeast

1/4 c warm water

2 1/2 c warm milk

3/4 c butter, melted and cooled

1 egg

1/2 tsp salt

1 c sugar

1 1/2 tsp ground cardamom (IMO, I easily could have used 2 tsp or more, this was a little subtler than I wanted)

7-7.5 c AP flour

 

Dissolve yeast in water.  Add milk, butter, egg, salt, sugar and cardamom.  Gradually beat in about 7 c of flour to stiff dough.  Knead until smooth and satiny (10-20 min).  Turn in a greased bowl, cover and rise until doubled (2 hours).  Punch down and divide into 6.  Roll into 24 inch ropes, braid 3 into a loaf or wreath.  Repeat for 2nd loaf.  Cover and rise until almost doubled (40 min).

 

Bake 350 35-40 minutes or until med brown.  Cool 10 minutes.

 

The recipe also calls for a sugar icing and decorating with candied cherries, but IMO that's overkill.  It's a really soft loaf, makes a great french toast. 

 

If you're testing holiday recipes - my fave book has an entire section on them.  Yugoslavian Potica, Czech Houska, Russian Krendl, Belgian Cramique, German Stollen, Greek Christopomo and the Swedish Cardamom - and that's just the Xmas ones.  Let me know if you want recipes. 

post #31 of 120
Thread Starter 

I've just got some rye bread rising today. It's on the third rise, so I'm going to shape into a loaves in a bit and get it into the oven so it's ready to go with dinner. I forgot I wanted to add some caraway to it this time though... maybe I'll just sprinkle some on the top of the loaves as a garnish... 

post #32 of 120
Anyone working with sourdough? I am toying with the idea of getting a starter going.
post #33 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post

 

OOF - I was wrong, it is in fact a Xmas loaf.  Called Swedish Cardamom Wreath, although I believe I just made a braided loaf last time - I don't like dealing with storing wreaths.  I'm going to abbreviate the steps, since i don't feel like typing out the whole thing (half a page).

 

1 pkg yeast

1/4 c warm water

2 1/2 c warm milk

3/4 c butter, melted and cooled

1 egg

1/2 tsp salt

1 c sugar

1 1/2 tsp ground cardamom (IMO, I easily could have used 2 tsp or more, this was a little subtler than I wanted)

7-7.5 c AP flour

 

Dissolve yeast in water.  Add milk, butter, egg, salt, sugar and cardamom.  Gradually beat in about 7 c of flour to stiff dough.  Knead until smooth and satiny (10-20 min).  Turn in a greased bowl, cover and rise until doubled (2 hours).  Punch down and divide into 6.  Roll into 24 inch ropes, braid 3 into a loaf or wreath.  Repeat for 2nd loaf.  Cover and rise until almost doubled (40 min).

 

Bake 350 35-40 minutes or until med brown.  Cool 10 minutes.

 

The recipe also calls for a sugar icing and decorating with candied cherries, but IMO that's overkill.  It's a really soft loaf, makes a great french toast. 

 

If you're testing holiday recipes - my fave book has an entire section on them.  Yugoslavian Potica, Czech Houska, Russian Krendl, Belgian Cramique, German Stollen, Greek Christopomo and the Swedish Cardamom - and that's just the Xmas ones.  Let me know if you want recipes. 


Thanks for taking the time to post the recipe! The ingredient list is similar to the one I have, but slightly different proportions (I used less butter, more egg) and the rise times are different. I was very suspicious when I made it, because of course it failed the finger-poke test after the first rise. The recipe reassured me that it would be fine, that a short rise was all that was needed. I should have listened to my instincts. I also wondered about whether to add the butter at a later point. The magazine recipe also added the milk, butter and egg at the same time. I thought adding the butter separately, like a brioche, might make a difference to the final result. It looks like that isn't necessary for a nice loaf. Next time I try, I'll use your recipe. 

 

Thanks also for your kind offer of other recipes, but I think I'm okay. I'm making Stollen this week. Next week is Birnbrot, a Swiss bread with a dried fruit filling in the middle instead of marzipan and then Danish Kringle the week of Christmas. With the regular loaves I need to bake, that should keep me busy enough. Maybe next year!!  

 

 

 

 

post #34 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by craft_media_hero View Post

Anyone working with sourdough? I am toying with the idea of getting a starter going.


I had a starter, generously shared by a friend. I failed to tend it though. The guilt greensad.gif !! I like sourdough though, especially for sandwiches, yum! 

post #35 of 120
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post

I had a starter, generously shared by a friend. I failed to tend it though. The guilt greensad.gif !! I like sourdough though, especially for sandwiches, yum! 


Same here... my most recent one perished a few weeks before Thanksgiving. And then I went out and bough a bulk package of instant yeast. :-) 

 

post #36 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by craft_media_hero View Post

Anyone working with sourdough? I am toying with the idea of getting a starter going.


 

Not currently, although I have in the past.  I used to bake sourdough twice a week, it was the only bread I ate.  Of course, that also meant that I gained weight like mad, since it was the basis of my diet.  bag.gif

 

I've considered starting a rye sourdough, I even have the whole rye that is needed for it.  But I haven't done it.  It's just a big time commitment, and I'm lazy. 

post #37 of 120

Oh so many years ago I made a sourdough starter from a recipe in my Betty Crocker cookbook. Other folks had said how good sourdough was; but at that point I don't think I had ever tasted it. So after several days of doing what I was supposed to do, the "starter" got a liquid on top that looked and smelled somewhat like beer. Apparently that is what it is supposed to do. Coming from a family that didn't drink at all, I thought it had spoiled and threw it out. Duh. I haven't tried it since. I do like the recipe for all whole wheat in the Healthy Bread in 5 minutes a day book. I haven't tried many others. After the first rise at room temp it does a slow rise in the fridge which really helps in developing a good flavor. I think speeding up the rise by keeping the dough very warm tends to "flatten out" the flavor. Sorry I can't think of a better description. I would say if possible leave a lot of time for a cooler rise and make sure it is risen as it should be even if it takes much longer than the recipe says.

post #38 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post


1 1/2 tsp ground cardamom (IMO, I easily could have used 2 tsp or more, this was a little subtler than I wanted)



 

Ok, replying to my own post here...  I made this bread yesterday, baked it off this morning.  Next time I'll boost the cardamom to 2.5 tsp or maybe a full Tbs.  I did 2 tsp in this one (and 1 tsp was fresh ground in my mortar and pestle), and it was still too subtle for me.  The problem is finding the balance between flavor and overkill, since cardamom can be aggressive.  This is a super tender loaf, and I'll warn you to keep an eye on it.  I set my timer for 30 minutes, it went about 32 before I could get to it, and it was a bit overbrown for my taste - it probably could have used a few more minutes to cook some more (it's not underdone, but still a bit moist), but maybe I'll cover it for the last few minutes next time. 

 

 

What I'm wondering about is baking for Xmas.  We're going to be driving up to see family on Xmas Eve - it's a 12 hour drive and we'll be leaving in the wee hours, so we won't get in until late Xmas Eve.  But I would love to bake a couple loaves of this off Xmas morning.  Just not sure how to manage that.  I can make the dough on the 23rd, but then it's going to have to travel in the car with us all day on the 24th.  I can shape it before bed so I can just stick it in the oven on the 25th, but is that too much proofing?  It's not like the inside of the car is going to be cold (it's a hatchback, so no trunk).  Anyone have any thoughts/experience with leaving a yeasted loaf to proof for a day and a half before baking? 

post #39 of 120
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post

What I'm wondering about is baking for Xmas.  We're going to be driving up to see family on Xmas Eve - it's a 12 hour drive and we'll be leaving in the wee hours, so we won't get in until late Xmas Eve.  But I would love to bake a couple loaves of this off Xmas morning.  Just not sure how to manage that.  I can make the dough on the 23rd, but then it's going to have to travel in the car with us all day on the 24th.  I can shape it before bed so I can just stick it in the oven on the 25th, but is that too much proofing?  It's not like the inside of the car is going to be cold (it's a hatchback, so no trunk).  Anyone have any thoughts/experience with leaving a yeasted loaf to proof for a day and a half before baking? 


You can't really overproof bread. Actually, the more you proof, the better the flavor and texture will be. When I have the time, I like to set my bread for five rises. Seems excessive, but they're really great loaves when I can do it. Also, you can do a long and slow proof in cool temps or the fridge. So if you mix it up on the 23rd and give it a regular warm rise or two and then stick it in the fridge it should be fine until the evening of the 24th when you return. Take it out before you go to bed to shape the loaf and stick it back in the fridge for a long and slow final proof in the fridge. Take it out first thing on Christmas morning, let it come up to room temp and then bake. It should work out just fine.

 

I'm thinking of attempting this method with risen cinnamon rolls myself, since we have similar travel arrangements this year. 

 

ETA - or if you have time on the 23rd, you could parbake and freeze your loaf. Just bake it to within ten minutes or so of being done. Let it cool to room temp and freeze. When you get home on the 24th, put in the fridge to defrost overnight and then bake it for the ten minutes or so it needs Christmas morning. Parbaking makes it easier to freeze, and it won't overbake when you warm it in the oven before serving. I did this with dinner rolls at Thanksgiving and they were great. 

post #40 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post

Ok, replying to my own post here...  I made this bread yesterday, baked it off this morning.  Next time I'll boost the cardamom to 2.5 tsp or maybe a full Tbs.  

 

 

 

The Finnish recipe that I originally tried used 1 tsp. of cardamom for 2 cups flour. It made one small loaf (another knock against that recipe). The flavour was excellent though, well-developed and fully present without being overpowering, if you know what I mean. So for 2 good-sized loaves, a little more than 2 teaspoons of spice sounds about right. 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post

 

What I'm wondering about is baking for Xmas.  We're going to be driving up to see family on Xmas Eve - it's a 12 hour drive and we'll be leaving in the wee hours, so we won't get in until late Xmas Eve.  But I would love to bake a couple loaves of this off Xmas morning.  Just not sure how to manage that.  I can make the dough on the 23rd, but then it's going to have to travel in the car with us all day on the 24th.  I can shape it before bed so I can just stick it in the oven on the 25th, but is that too much proofing?  It's not like the inside of the car is going to be cold (it's a hatchback, so no trunk).  Anyone have any thoughts/experience with leaving a yeasted loaf to proof for a day and a half before baking? 


Could you freeze the loaves, transport them in a cooler (if you have room) and then let them thaw so they can go in the oven on the 25th? I have not tried this, but I recall a post about it on the 101 Cookbooks blog last year. She did it successfully for cinnamon rolls. She prepped the rolls, placed them in freezer bags with all the air squeezed out, and froze them ahead of Christmas. On Christmas Eve, she let them thaw overnight on the countertop  and then baked them off in the morning for Christmas brunch. I did make the cinnamon rolls without the freezing step and they are tasty.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

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