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To pump or not to pump? - Page 2

post #21 of 26

So I don't really know how this engorgement thing works... I will be a SAHM and wasn't planning to buy anything more than a little manual pump for that rare trip to the hair salon or a date with DH.  My mom has me thinking that a good electric pump (like from the hospital) is a MUST for early breastfeeding when the engorgement kicks in.  Is this true?  Also, her supply more or less dried up by a year, I think because she was pumping and not feeding on demand.  Is that more or less how the supply works? I need to go buy a book...

post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by element2012 View Post

So I don't really know how this engorgement thing works... I will be a SAHM and wasn't planning to buy anything more than a little manual pump for that rare trip to the hair salon or a date with DH.  My mom has me thinking that a good electric pump (like from the hospital) is a MUST for early breastfeeding when the engorgement kicks in.  Is this true?  Also, her supply more or less dried up by a year, I think because she was pumping and not feeding on demand.  Is that more or less how the supply works? I need to go buy a book...

This was my experience (but remember everyone is different) - My milk came in at 3 days and it was intense!!  I am small chested and stayed that way, but my breasts were so full/engorged that it made it more difficult for my son to latch compared to when I just had colostrum.  A baby's stomach is only the size of a grape when they are newborn so there is no way for them to completely empty the breast at first.  I was intimidated by my pump at first so we just suffered through.  I think it lead to more pain than was necessary.  I wish now I had used the pump immediately to pump off a little of the milk.  It can also help the nipple protrude a bit and help with latch.  We would have both been happier.  I started pumping around 3 or 4 weeks I think.  We survived just fine and had a VERY successful BFing relationship, however, for this next baby, I just know how to make it a little easier.  I know plenty of mommas that never pump or just hand express as needed.  I manual pump would also work just fine to give you a little relief from engorgement.  Cabbage leaves, a hot shower, hot compresses also help with engorgement.  I used an electric pump b/c that's what I had for when I went back to work.  Everyone's situation is different and you just don't know what will work for you until it actually happens.

 

 

post #23 of 26

When you are pumping to soften an engorged breast you only want to pump a TINY bit - until the breast softens enough for the baby to latch on.  If you pump more than that, your body will assume the baby is drinking that milk and it will make more milk!

 

I don't think a hospital grade pump is necessary unless you are exclusively pumping for some reason, and in that case, they do work far better than other pumps.

post #24 of 26

Yeah, the only reason for a hospital grade pump is if you're working & need a lot of milk stored, imo. You don't need a pump AT ALL for engorgement. If it's so bad that baby can't latch on, you can hand express enough to make it so baby can latch. In fact there's some evidence hand expression is a lot better than using a pump, especially early on. (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110718201518.htm)

 

And a good video on how to express by hand http://newborns.stanford.edu/Breastfeeding/HandExpression.html

 

post #25 of 26
Thread Starter 

That was an awesome video, thank you!!!

post #26 of 26

I exclusively breastfeed my DD (meaning she only got breastmilk), but I did on occasion, pump so I could have milk stored in case I had to go to the store without her or something.  I would never want to exclusively pump unless I had to... that just seems like too much work.

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