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Bone Broth color, what should it look like? Is it creamy/beige color? - Page 2

post #21 of 32

Not sure what color it *should* look like, but mine is usually a golden yellow and cloudy.  I don't skim off the fat, but I do skim any "scum" (it's impurities rising, from what I understand?)  I just chuck a carcass into my big pot with some salt and raw apple cider vinegar. I bring it to a boil, skim off the scum, then reduce the heat and simmer.  I throw in some carrots, onions, and celery before I go to bed, and let it simmer for at least 24 hours total.  Then I strain it to get any chunks out out and divide it into ball freezer jars and freeze it.  I do mostly chicken, but also turkey, duck, beef, and pig bones.

post #22 of 32

I made bone broth for the very first time and cooked it for about 14 hours in a slow cooker. I added water a few times, but I never saw any 'scum' at the top of the broth. Why not? Did I do something wrong? The color it ended up being is a light yellowish color and it is not see through and a little thick. 

post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by GER611 View Post

I made bone broth for the very first time and cooked it for about 14 hours in a slow cooker. I added water a few times, but I never saw any 'scum' at the top of the broth. Why not? Did I do something wrong? The color it ended up being is a light yellowish color and it is not see through and a little thick. 


It probably didn't boil.  I boil mine a bit first, and then let it simmer.  Boiling makes the scum come to the top.

 

post #24 of 32

So then there are probably no special benefits to the bone broth I made?  Thanks so much for the info. I started the broth in a dutch oven and after 4 hours, switched it to a crock pot. I saw it simmer, but not boil wildly. How long should I let it boil the next time? 

post #25 of 32

I"m sure there is still lots of goof stuff in there!  I just let mine come to a boil for, oh, maybe 5 minutes (gently boiling, not rolling) while I skim.

post #26 of 32

Oh good! Thank you. I froze 5 jars worth, so I'm glad to hear there are still benefits to it. I will make sure to watch it boil the next time. 

post #27 of 32

So what I've been calling stock (bones, skin, cartilege simmered for hours) that jells when it's cold is the same as what you call bone broth? I never thought of putting any acid in it. I guess that would help dissolve the minerals. Is it the dissolved minerals that sometimes makes it very whitish-opaque? I've sometimes had broth/stock not jell when I chilled it, simmered it more the next day (after it sat in the fridge over night with the bones and all in it) and it then turned whitish. I thought something was wrong with it and dumped it. It might have been more nutritious than what I usually make. Hmmm

post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaJoie View Post

So what I've been calling stock (bones, skin, cartilege simmered for hours) that jells when it's cold is the same as what you call bone broth? I never thought of putting any acid in it. I guess that would help dissolve the minerals. Is it the dissolved minerals that sometimes makes it very whitish-opaque? I've sometimes had broth/stock not jell when I chilled it, simmered it more the next day (after it sat in the fridge over night with the bones and all in it) and it then turned whitish. I thought something was wrong with it and dumped it. It might have been more nutritious than what I usually make. Hmmm




Can't answer that question about the color, but that would have been perfectly good to keep!

post #29 of 32
I just made my first attempt at bone broth & base on the comments here I definitely got it wrong. It's cloudy & didn't gel at all after sitting in the fridge. It also didn't taste particularly great when I tried it. So what can or should I do with it? I'm assuming it's good for something & I'd hate to waste it after spending so long tending to it.

Also any ideas to trouble shoot for next time? I cooked it for one full day, refrigerated it over night & kept it going off & on the next day. It boiled for longer than it should have for a bit when DH was watching it. Also, the bones weren't particularly meaty & I added water quite a few times because it was reducing so much. Chicken broth I've got down, so I was disappointed that this came out so poorly.

TIA!
post #30 of 32

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by t2009 View Post

I just made my first attempt at bone broth & base on the comments here I definitely got it wrong. It's cloudy & didn't gel at all after sitting in the fridge. It also didn't taste particularly great when I tried it. So what can or should I do with it? I'm assuming it's good for something & I'd hate to waste it after spending so long tending to it.

Also any ideas to trouble shoot for next time? I cooked it for one full day, refrigerated it over night & kept it going off & on the next day. It boiled for longer than it should have for a bit when DH was watching it. Also, the bones weren't particularly meaty & I added water quite a few times because it was reducing so much. Chicken broth I've got down, so I was disappointed that this came out so poorly.

TIA!

 

 

Cloudiness is caused by boiling (not simmering).  That's appearance only.  Gelling is hit or miss, and dependent upon what you put in it - I have about a 50/50 chance of my chicken stock gelling, but nothing else tends to gel for me.  As to taste, IME, without a fair bit of salt, it tastes hideous.  It smells hideous too.  But if I put it in something and season it up, it's great. 

 

The bones don't need to be meaty, but you do need to have enough of them for the volume of water you put in.  And if it's evaporating too quickly, add a lid, and turn down your heat.  I don't refrigerate it overnight because it makes it too difficult to get the full 24 hours out of it, I just turn it down to the lowest setting and leave it overnight. 

 

As for color, if you start with raw bones or even bones that have only been cooked on the inside (like a chicken), then it's going to be light in color.  For a darker color, you need to roast your bones.  It does provide a deeper flavor also, but is not completely necessary. 

post #31 of 32

Also, make sure to add bones&meat into a cold water so fibers can slowly open up and release nutrients caught inside. Dumping meat into hot water will seal them inside (great if you just want to eat the meat). :) When I say cold water I mean "pour cold water, drop the stuff, and put on the cooker". Soaking over night might also be beneficial - my grandma always does that but she is simmering it only for 4 hours (not long enough IMO).

post #32 of 32
Thanks! DH cooked with the broth I made & it's adequate - at least we can use it. But I will definitely Ty your suggestions for next time!
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