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How much $ do you plan to spend per child THIS holiday season? - Page 4

post #61 of 151

Oh, I'd happily spend $2,000 on ds if I had it to spare, lol.  There are so many things we've been doing without so long...  We keep trouble shooting his computer that is older than he is.  I'd love to buy him a good laptop and a gaming system.  Anyway, I'm making gifts for everyone but ds and trying hard to use materials I have or can get very cheaply.  I put away a couple of lego sets that I got on clearance after last Christmas and have found a couple of things for him at the thrift store.  I'm hoping freecycle will turn up a couple of other things that seem like the kinds of things people may have and be ready to pass along.  I'm not sure what my total will be this year, maybe as high as $150 spent over the course of the year.  I could easily spend hardly anything for him when he was a toddler/preschooler.  More people sent him gifts when he was younger and I could find age appropriate toys of good quality at thrift stores with a little effort.

post #62 of 151

We got DD's main present (a marble run) for free with points from our Amazon card. I also bought her three packs of colored duct tape.  I might add a book in the mix as well.  Other than this, I will get some $$ candy from Whole Foods for her stocking b/c she can't have artificial food dyes. I'll probably also load it up with some stickers and art supplies and some small playmobil kits. 

 

She gets a ton of gifts from our family, so we could spend nothing and she'd still get a haul.  We're really lucky.

post #63 of 151

We've spent about $100 on DD so far and I think we're done except for her stocking. Not sure what I'm going to put in there, as I don't want to completely load it up with candy. She's only 28 months.

post #64 of 151

=


Edited by oma to 9 - 11/28/11 at 10:08pm
post #65 of 151
I would be really interested to know how many of the people who think its so, so terrible to spend money on your kids grew up in a middle class/ upper class family. There were years where I didnt get anything for christmas, and years where my parents didnt get paid until after christmas and I was promised some gift that they never got around to being able to afford because they would inevitably have to spend the money on some bill, car problems that came up, a medical expense, ect. I grew up in a family where we never had anything that all the other kids had, and that is a really hard way to grow up. I can remember when it seemed like almost every single kid in the class would get something for christmas that there was just no way I was going to get, along with things that all the other kids already had that my family couldnt afford.

Given, that is just part of being a poor kid in public school, but I can remember asking my parents for a pair of birkenstocks when I was in 6th grade and every single person in my homeroom except for me and one other girl had a pair. It was ALL I wanted for christmas, and my mom promised to buy them the first week of January. I never got them, and I got a couple of $15.00 gifts that my mom could afford. Also, expensive stuff is usually the better quality stuff. My mom couldve afforded birkenstocks if she had budgeted correctly. Instead, she bought me a pair of payless clogs 4-5 times throughout the year because I wore them out. About the same price.

All Im saying is, when you grew up not having what you wanted/needed I think sometimes you are more inclined to make sure your kid gets what they want. In my experience, most of the mom's I know who dont let their kid have expensive things, popular things, or THE thing that is "in" at the time (like american dolls) based on some principal they have are the moms who never had to experience being the only kid that didnt get those things when they were growing up. Its easy to say that kids dont need all that stuff when you grew up having everything you need.

As I mentioned earlier, I plan on spending less than $100 (and I dont buy something everytime we go into a store. She hasnt had a gift since her birthday that wasnt a book) on my kiddo, and that includes me making her gifts, but you can believe that if I can afford for her to have something more expensive when she is a little older, Ill buy it- maybe second hand or on clearance, maybe even at 3am on black friday, but Ill try my best to figure out a way to get it.
post #66 of 151



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oma to 9 View Post

Even the years hubby and I made over $80K we still spent less than $50 on each person we bought for.  I just don't get buying into this "gimme, gimme" mentality. 

 

I remember when the Christmas stuff didn't show up in stores till after Thanksgiving.  In fact, as a child, I didn't see Christmas stuff till around the first of December.  These days the retailers cram commercialism down our throats beginning the middle of October, and every year it gets more and more ridiculous.  To top it all off, the need to buy, buy, buy  they shove down our throats makes those who can't afford a $200 doll for their kids feel bad, and many of those very kids, only taught Santa and, "He knows if you've been bad or good," look at the scarcity under the tree and begin to believe they've fallen short somehow.  A knockoff game or a cheaper doll or a simple toy just doesn't match up in their minds because on TV, every good kid gets this brand or that look or another style. 

 

What, really, are we teaching our kids when we let a TV or computer screen dictate what is good and what they need?  Without TV, for example, and not knocking anyone in particular but just as the first thing that came into my head, would the $200 American Girl doll be on so many young ladies' wish lists?  Would kids think they needed name brand clothes or video games, or would they be outdoors playing and using their imagination like we did as kids?

 

  


I agree with the your commercialism rant, but I don't believe it is relevant to this point because I'm not hearing it on this thread. And I don't understand why you are accusing people of spending more than $50 as buying into a "gimme gimme" mentality or that we allow TV to dictate to us what our kids need. That's a blatant generalization and an uncalled for assumption and an unpleasant accusation. I'm certainly not going to justify my spending habits, but you don't seem to be hearing what a lot of people are saying - they don't tend to buy toys throughout the year, use the occassion to buy necessities, etc. I'm sure when your kids were young you sometimes bought them some toy from a store, and you know, there's that whole inflation thing going on.......

Also, if I wanted to buy my child a simple fleece and a bathrobe for Christmas from your Etsy site, why that right there would be $70.
 

 

post #67 of 151

Adaline's Mama - Refering to your birkenstock example, as an adult I've learned what needs to be purchased based on quality and therefore worth the price. That's why I scrimp in many areas - usually by buying second-hand - and buy those $100 shoes. My back, ankles, and feet are worth a lot to me! But in the context of this thread, I also use that mentality while buying Christmas gifts. I will buy quality soft cotton sheets and purchase from the local toy store that stands behind their items rather than buy itchy thin sheets and buy a toy that could break within 2 months. I bought a sheet set from Ross once to save money, the fitted sheet ripped after 2 washings!! But I digress.....

post #68 of 151


Word!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adaline'sMama View Post

I would be really interested to know how many of the people who think its so, so terrible to spend money on your kids grew up in a middle class/ upper class family. There were years where I didnt get anything for christmas, and years where my parents didnt get paid until after christmas and I was promised some gift that they never got around to being able to afford because they would inevitably have to spend the money on some bill, car problems that came up, a medical expense, ect. I grew up in a family where we never had anything that all the other kids had, and that is a really hard way to grow up. I can remember when it seemed like almost every single kid in the class would get something for christmas that there was just no way I was going to get, along with things that all the other kids already had that my family couldnt afford.
Given, that is just part of being a poor kid in public school, but I can remember asking my parents for a pair of birkenstocks when I was in 6th grade and every single person in my homeroom except for me and one other girl had a pair. It was ALL I wanted for christmas, and my mom promised to buy them the first week of January. I never got them, and I got a couple of $15.00 gifts that my mom could afford. Also, expensive stuff is usually the better quality stuff. My mom couldve afforded birkenstocks if she had budgeted correctly. Instead, she bought me a pair of payless clogs 4-5 times throughout the year because I wore them out. About the same price.
All Im saying is, when you grew up not having what you wanted/needed I think sometimes you are more inclined to make sure your kid gets what they want. In my experience, most of the mom's I know who dont let their kid have expensive things, popular things, or THE thing that is "in" at the time (like american dolls) based on some principal they have are the moms who never had to experience being the only kid that didnt get those things when they were growing up. Its easy to say that kids dont need all that stuff when you grew up having everything you need.
As I mentioned earlier, I plan on spending less than $100 (and I dont buy something everytime we go into a store. She hasnt had a gift since her birthday that wasnt a book) on my kiddo, and that includes me making her gifts, but you can believe that if I can afford for her to have something more expensive when she is a little older, Ill buy it- maybe second hand or on clearance, maybe even at 3am on black friday, but Ill try my best to figure out a way to get it.


I would like to point out that my kids know they will get what they need even if that means I'm going to be behind on a bill.  Not smart really to be behind but in the long run they know that I will do what I have to for them.  For those that can't afford the things their kids need, my heart aches for them.  I know what you mean though Adaline, my mom would promise things then tell me she didn't have the money for it after she bought herself new shoes or a new coat.  I once gave her my Bon Marche credit card to use on clothes for my sister, when DH got the bill he almost exploded all the things listed were for my mom.  Not my sister.  He paid it then sent her a note that said Merry Christmas for life now give us back the card!   I hate dropping my kids off at school to see moms dressed to the hilt while their kids look like trash and are wearing thin jackets and destroyed shoes.  I don't know their situation, maybe mom has had those clothes for years and is good at taking care of them.  She should teach her kids the same things then.  Otherwise DH has had to hold his tongue numerous times, he wants to yell at them and go buy their kid a coat.  There is one mom who drives a mercedes and her kids looks like crap all the time.  She looks great.  Of course she probably saves money buying the crappiest clothes possible for her kid while she spends the rest on her car note.  Bullshittery!

 

post #69 of 151

Oma, I think your post is pretty assumptive.  We buy our DD nice presents and good toys because we really like to play as a family.  She happily entertains herself with her toys for much of the day and I know that's good for her development.  She's really happy when she's playing and I like having a richly prepared play environment for her.  I'm not convinced that DD has ever seen a commercial for a toy because we're pretty strict about screen time and don't have broadcast tv and when I asked her what she wanted from Santa this year she told me a candy cane. 

 

We also tend to spend more because we like toys that are made by responsible companies.  Her toy this year (even though we're getting it with our amazon points) was made in the USA.  I'm happy about that even though we could have bought a bigger MIC one.  We also donate a ton to charity.  We just love toys and Christmas and that doesn't mean we're raising a "gimme" kid.  

post #70 of 151

We used to be awful, we put stuff on credit cards, spent way more than we could pay back. Now, we use cash only. I know some people would find that we over spend, but we do our best to keep the costs down by buying second hand when and if we can.

 

For our budget, the amount isn't unreasonable.

 

 

post #71 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoopin' Mama View Post

 

Also, if I wanted to buy my child a simple fleece and a bathrobe for Christmas from your Etsy site, why that right there would be $70.
 

 



ROTFLMAO.gif

post #72 of 151

We spent a bit more than I expected to on DD this year, but nothing frivolous. Her big present is a complete boxed set of Beatrix Potter books for $89, which was like 74% off on a deal site. She LOVES being read to, loves Beatrix Potter (she knows The Tale of Benjamin Bunny off by heart), and loves small-sized books; plus, unlike some of her other favourite books, I'll happily read Beatrix Potter to her over and over because I love the writing style and pictures. So, totally worth it. Plus, no reason they won't last through however many kids we have.

 

Then we also got her a neat little handmade wooden stool, which was about $60 and cheap at the price, when we were on holiday in a small crafty town. It'll be handy for her to wash her hands in the bathroom, sit on to read books, stand on to help me cook, whatever.

 

I also got her a few crafty items (sidewalk chalk and... something else?) from K-Mart so I could get my parking validated, and a fancy sticker book for free while mystery shopping. And I'm sewing her a neat messenger bag out of fabric I already had and a placemat that was originally a wedding present.

 

That seems like a pretty good haul to me - I might also sew her a dress if I get time, and I have a craft project underway to make alphabet magnets to use as (pre-)homeschooling manipulatives.

 

Honestly, though? If we had more money, there are plenty more expensive, worthwhile, not-TV-driven-because-we-don't-have-one items I'd love to get or make her. We're moving to the country in a month or so. I'd love her to have a trike... and she'll be moving into her own bedroom for the first time, which I'd love to set up with a little table and mirror and bookshelves and one of those awesome DIY fabric teepees, and a whiteboard and art display board. I'd like her to have an outside water play trough like at Playcentre. She would LOVE a play kitchen, a dollhouse and a doll pram. And I don't think any of those things would transform her into a materialistic brat - I think they'd enrich her life.

 

DS is getting the short end of the stick this year, though, seeing as he'll be 6 months old and doesn't care. Hopefully I'll get his floor quilt done, and I'll make him some little dangly toys either to clip onto his onesie or hang over the bar on his car seat. He'll be fine with that. :)

post #73 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by oma to 9 View Post

Even the years hubby and I made over $80K we still spent less than $50 on each person we bought for.  I just don't get buying into this "gimme, gimme" mentality. 

 

I remember when the Christmas stuff didn't show up in stores till after Thanksgiving.  In fact, as a child, I didn't see Christmas stuff till around the first of December.  These days the retailers cram commercialism down our throats beginning the middle of October, and every year it gets more and more ridiculous.  To top it all off, the need to buy, buy, buy  they shove down our throats makes those who can't afford a $200 doll for their kids feel bad, and many of those very kids, only taught Santa and, "He knows if you've been bad or good," look at the scarcity under the tree and begin to believe they've fallen short somehow.  A knockoff game or a cheaper doll or a simple toy just doesn't match up in their minds because on TV, every good kid gets this brand or that look or another style. 

 

What, really, are we teaching our kids when we let a TV or computer screen dictate what is good and what they need?  Without TV, for example, and not knocking anyone in particular but just as the first thing that came into my head, would the $200 American Girl doll be on so many young ladies' wish lists?  Would kids think they needed name brand clothes or video games, or would they be outdoors playing and using their imagination like we did as kids?

 

[snip] They are happy with what they get.  Nobody returns anything.  We just don't.  But, like I said before, we're not normal anyhow.

 

Trisha


Define "normal."  I ask because I know more people who are thoughtful in their approach to gift giving than not, and it just gripes me when people take the high road based on broad stroke generalizations.  It sort of makes me chuckle, too, when people speak of the glorious old days when things were supposedly godly and warm, particularly when it comes from my generation (I'm more than old enough to be a grandma).  Commercialism has always been out there, there is just wider access now due to the explosion of different media.  Think of little Nellie Olsen showing off her dolls to Laura or walking into the toy section at an old Woolworth's.  While commercialism may have been less obvious when I was younger, the biggest single influences as far as toys and goods were my peers and the actual stores themselves. I think that is still largely true.  My DD wanted a scooter.  Why did she want a scooter?  Because she saw a pack of kids riding their scooters down the block.  I mean, I could hole myself up in a log cabin somewhere without access to civilization, but that is presently impractical and I think the best way to learn these types of life lessons is that you may see something you want, but that doesn't always mean you can have it or that it is in your best interest.  I don't blame commercialism.  Big business is just doing what it thinks it needs to do to turn a profit.  I could only blame myself if I made my decisions based on what I thought big business wanted me to do.  

 

We don't do Santa because we don't celebrate Christmas, but we do some gift giving during the holidays and it is usually the only time when we get the one big quality gift for DD, which is usually given on New Year's eve.  This year we're spending a little more than usual because we are investing in a dollhouse for DD, and in subsequent years we will get smaller items to add to said house.  We do try to approach gifts as longer term investments (something that DD will use over a period of years rather than just short term).  Last year we got her a camera because she has shown a keen interest in photography and is actually pretty good.  DH got DD some very small items for each night of Hanukkah.  Both DH and I grew up in upper middle class families, and we've been fairly blessed ourselves in terms of financial stability.  Even so, neither of our families were much on a huge amount of gift giving unless it was stuff that could really be used or fit one's specific interests (like my parents got me a drafting table one year that I used for a good twenty years).  I think there are a lot of people out there like my family and friends.  Commercialism may be in our faces, but I don't think that mindless, rampant gift giving is the norm.  It is like the whole Black Friday subject in another thread.  I think there are limited numbers of people who engage in the whole Black Friday thing, but I think it is more hype than anything.

 

After reading Smokering's post above I want edit to add that we too choose gifts because we see them as enriching DD's life based on what we know about her interests and imagination.  I can't really put a dollar amount on what we do each year because as long as it is within budget, it varies based on where DD is in her life and her interests.  We live in the middle of a large city with a long winter.  She spends a good deal of time holed up in the apartment with us during the cold weather months.  Imagination is her best friend.  If we can help her along in her imaginative play, than I am glad to do it.  

 


Edited by CatsCradle - 11/27/11 at 12:32pm
post #74 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by oma to 9 View Post

Even the years hubby and I made over $80K we still spent less than $50 on each person we bought for.  I just don't get buying into this "gimme, gimme" mentality. 

 

I remember when the Christmas stuff didn't show up in stores till after Thanksgiving.  In fact, as a child, I didn't see Christmas stuff till around the first of December.  These days the retailers cram commercialism down our throats beginning the middle of October, and every year it gets more and more ridiculous.  To top it all off, the need to buy, buy, buy  they shove down our throats makes those who can't afford a $200 doll for their kids feel bad, and many of those very kids, only taught Santa and, "He knows if you've been bad or good," look at the scarcity under the tree and begin to believe they've fallen short somehow.  A knockoff game or a cheaper doll or a simple toy just doesn't match up in their minds because on TV, every good kid gets this brand or that look or another style. 

 

What, really, are we teaching our kids when we let a TV or computer screen dictate what is good and what they need?  Without TV, for example, and not knocking anyone in particular but just as the first thing that came into my head, would the $200 American Girl doll be on so many young ladies' wish lists?  Would kids think they needed name brand clothes or video games, or would they be outdoors playing and using their imagination like we did as kids?

 

I'd better stop while I'm ahead....whistling.gif

 

Oh, and in reference to another poster, my Mom got furious last year when her gift didn't arrive when she thought it should, so she went and bought herself a present, wrapped it, and added it to the ones she buys for herself from her first and second ex-husbands, my now-deceased second brother, and whoever else she thinks ought to buy her a gift but doesn't.  Last year hubby and I didn't have a thing under the tree.  Our kids are struggling and we helped them pay bills and such so we determined a few things for the grandkids - pajamas, pillowcases, board games, and a few books - were more important than giving each other something.  I personally don't care if I get anything or not.  My kids never asked for anything specific and the grandkids don't do that either.  They are happy with what they get.  Nobody returns anything.  We just don't.  But, like I said before, we're not normal anyhow.

 

Trisha

 

The biggest issue I have with posts like this is the implication that people who are spending more than $50.00/child are "buying into this "gimme, gimme" mentality". If I buy cheap, plastic crap from tv, I spend less, not more. I'm probably spending about $200/child this year, averaged out, including stockings (have done a little more of our actual shopping, so I'm getting a better handle on what it will end up being.) One of those gifts is a set of quality (expensive) coloured pencils, for ds1, because he wants to extend his sketching from straight graphite/charcoal grayscale to adding shading and colour. We got them half price, but they were still a lot of money. We'll probably augment the one medium-sized set of Lego that the kids own. If we buy the same size again (three of them use it regularly, and ds1 messes around with it sometimes, too), it will cost about $45.00, plus 12% sales tax. The fact that someone is spending more than $50/kid doesn't mean they're all about the "gimme gimme" mentality. There's a lot of middle ground.

 

We spend more time in front of screens than we should (the amount of time has been very up and down over the last four years). None of it is commercial television, with ads. None. My kids know a lot of the trendy toys and stuff, because they play with them when they visit their friends...but they're not asking for them. I've never been able to afford a $200 doll for my kids (unless it was their only gift, and probably no stocking, except an orange, a few bits of candy and a toothbrush...which is fine, but I've got a thing about stockings), and I've never felt bad about it. I can't actually imagine why I would.

post #75 of 151


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

 

The biggest issue I have with posts like this is the implication that people who are spending more than $50.00/child are "buying into this "gimme, gimme" mentality". If I buy cheap, plastic crap from tv, I spend less, not more. I'm probably spending about $200/child this year, averaged out, including stockings (have done a little more of our actual shopping, so I'm getting a better handle on what it will end up being.) One of those gifts is a set of quality (expensive) coloured pencils, for ds1, because he wants to extend his sketching from straight graphite/charcoal grayscale to adding shading and colour. We got them half price, but they were still a lot of money. We'll probably augment the one medium-sized set of Lego that the kids own. If we buy the same size again (three of them use it regularly, and ds1 messes around with it sometimes, too), it will cost about $45.00, plus 12% sales tax. The fact that someone is spending more than $50/kid doesn't mean they're all about the "gimme gimme" mentality. There's a lot of middle ground.

 

We spend more time in front of screens than we should (the amount of time has been very up and down over the last four years). None of it is commercial television, with ads. None. My kids know a lot of the trendy toys and stuff, because they play with them when they visit their friends...but they're not asking for them. I've never been able to afford a $200 doll for my kids (unless it was their only gift, and probably no stocking, except an orange, a few bits of candy and a toothbrush...which is fine, but I've got a thing about stockings), and I've never felt bad about it. I can't actually imagine why I would.

I tend to agree.  I am on a limited budget, but I have no debt, at all.  I enjoy getting them presents for Christmas.  They usually have one item arouund$100.   They tell me exactly what they want.  If they want to go over that budget, they kick in a contribution.  I get them a few other things - pajamas, a couple of books (usually purchased used), some yard sale treasures, maybe another small toy or a new piece of clothing.  And stocking stuffers because they are fun.  I may spend $150 per kid.  If I left out the big gift, it would seem kind of lackluster.  They only get gifts for Christmas and their birthday.  My kids also celebrate Hanukkah, though, so that is a big more expense.  My kids never ask for anything, really.  They know if they want something we can find it at a yard sale usually, so they only ask for those things I can't find there.  They are certainly not spoiled and we all enjoy the spiritual side and the family part of Christmas.  My son has never been to a mall.  My daughter only once (for her 12th birthday) and she hated it.  She loves to read, bake, and has been known to help out by sharing her knowledge of medicinal herbs at herb classes.  They both know about world events, bullying and poverty and take steps on their own accord to help in these areas (reporting bullying, donating to red cross, etc.).  One would hardly call them spoiled.  And Christmas is FUN.
 

 

post #76 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmsMom View Post


 

  And Christmas is FUN.
 

 


Exactly.  We have the means to make this one day super special and magical and I want to do that for my children.

 

 

 

post #77 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmsMom View Post


 

I tend to agree.  I am on a limited budget, but I have no debt, at all.  I enjoy getting them presents for Christmas.  They usually have one item arouund$100.   They tell me exactly what they want.  If they want to go over that budget, they kick in a contribution.  I get them a few other things - pajamas, a couple of books (usually purchased used), some yard sale treasures, maybe another small toy or a new piece of clothing.  And stocking stuffers because they are fun.  I may spend $150 per kid.  If I left out the big gift, it would seem kind of lackluster.  They only get gifts for Christmas and their birthday.  My kids also celebrate Hanukkah, though, so that is a big more expense.  My kids never ask for anything, really.  They know if they want something we can find it at a yard sale usually, so they only ask for those things I can't find there.  They are certainly not spoiled and we all enjoy the spiritual side and the family part of Christmas.  My son has never been to a mall.  My daughter only once (for her 12th birthday) and she hated it.  She loves to read, bake, and has been known to help out by sharing her knowledge of medicinal herbs at herb classes.  They both know about world events, bullying and poverty and take steps on their own accord to help in these areas (reporting bullying, donating to red cross, etc.).  One would hardly call them spoiled.

 

Exactly. We're not doing very much this year, but the kids know we also donate money to several charities (around the year, not just now), and try to get involved with the Holiday Helper, one way or another, each year. They get really excited about picking out nice gifts for their cousins, some of whom live in poverty. They do ask for things, because we ask them to provide a wish list, as guidance for their extended family. They know they may, or may not, get anything from the list. (A couple years ago, at 4.5, ds2's entire wish list was "I really hope i get a candy cane!") They appreciate everything they get...even when none of it was on their list.

 

  And Christmas is FUN.
 

Yes. This.

 

Honestly, my family will spend a lot more than the $200ish/child for gifts and stocking stuffers. I've dropped somewhere around $75 for baking supplies, so that we can take some trays of cookies around to some of the neighbours. We'll go to at least one event that has a fairly high admission charge (this year, it will probably be the botanical gardens, as we haven't been for several years - they have over a million lights set up, roasted chestnut vendors on site, etc.), as well as the various freebies. I spend another $30ish on each of my nieces and nephews (mostly gift cards at this point, as they're reaching that "really want to get things for myself, but don't have my own money" stage...although I'm giving out two books from http://www.iseeme.com/ this year, and they're a little pricier. I've spent about another $50 or so on craft supplies, both just for fun for the kids throughout December, and so dd1 and ds2 an make ornaments for their grandparents. We have miscellaneous donations. Our total price tag on Christmas is pretty high - but it's far from all being spent on gifts.
 

 

post #78 of 151

it's kinda of hard to say really. I think about 100 for the baby (who is 7 months old and has five toys currently including a teething ring). My older son, who will turn 8 on the 21st will have a birthday and christmas of about $450 including stocking. The majority of that money is to be spent on a *very* nice lego set. 3000 pieces. normally 400 but we got it for less than 350.

 

sounds crazy you say? yes, well... we have the money to do it AND this boy is a genius lego builder and i know will treasure this christmas for the rest of his life. the lego set is as big as he is! i am excited about seeing it, too.

i mean, it's frickin cool!

http://shop.lego.com/en-US/Super-Star-Destroyer-10221

 

and like others we do not *ever* buy toys for our eldest. he must earn the money and save it and purchase items himself. so all year, nada unless he spends his hard earned cash on it.

 

and the little one well... id like for him to have some blocks and plan toys and books.

post #79 of 151

I do almost feel bad for the parents pushing giant heaping piles of plastic in walmart shopping carts and arguing about prices for expensive gadgety toys,oh man, turn off the tv 

 

We have our "santa" gift ( the most desired one) and 1 from my parents, and we draw names in my family (we have 12 immediate members) and they must be less than $25, this includes the two young ones in the family so they're not bombarded with presents

 

We splurged this year and invested in a playmobile set, he loved the retro esso station we have in the family so thought it would last and last, we threw in Harold the helicopter to add to thomas collection and a john deere toy tractor, everything was bought tax free (big savings in ontario ! lol ) during our village "moonlight madness" or like a black friday, and bought local!

 

100's of $$$ PER child seems...unnecessary? although playmobile set was about 100 deep (ouch) cant say ill be heading more into the bank account after that

 

Im shocked at how children demand so much but most of the time, its the parents feeding into it to fulfill their own inadequencies, im absent or spend little time playing, but here's $600 worth of stuff, can you be quiet now?

 

sorry, ive seen this ALOT! unfortunetly 

 

seems like most parents here are at $50-$100 ish total per child, and i assume were about quality, not quantity  

post #80 of 151
We're about quality, as well. Frankly, I don't feel the need to defend our spending on Christmas. We keep our eyes out for good deals, and buy quality toys. This year it was a Melissa & Doug wood work bench that DD has been wanting, and we got it for more than 50% off. Considering that it will last for a very long time and won't break, that's a pretty good deal. We have big extended families, so DD isn't just getting presents for us. We keep gifts for each other at around $50, as well. I think that most moms here are not the materialistic type, anyways.
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