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Planned repeat "easier" than emergency c? - Page 2

post #21 of 31
It was definitely easier emotionally. I wasn't in pain. I was mentally present for the birth. The nurses even placed a mirror so I could see the birth. (without seeing the wound).

I told the nurse in the pre op area about how nervous I was because of my last experience. When she brought me into the OR, she introduced me to the other nurses and told them how scared I was because of my previous birth. They were really wonderful. It was a very healing experience, for me at least.

Physically, I felt great. I was eating a sandwich later that night, and my doctor released me a day early.

I actually ended up getting some fluid behind my stitches and needed to have the incision re-opened and packed daily for a month, and I still felt physically and emotionally better than the first time. (my body reacts weirdly to stitches. It wasn't related to the surgeon.)
post #22 of 31

You generally get a spinal instead of an epidural if you have a planned c-section. It wears off after a few hours and then you're on a morphine pump.

post #23 of 31

Not necessarily. Spinal yes, but many anesthesiologists put Duramorph or another long lasting narcotic in the spinal, no PCA. There are anesthesiologists who prefer epidural or CSE, which would allow PCEA, but even though I had an epi for my first (attempted CSE) they did not use a pump. I got diamorphine. Second was a spinal with Duramorph and then IV Toradol.

post #24 of 31

Yes. I got a pump with dd2, because I requested it. (I HATE duramorph.) The nurses on the maternity ward were all boggled by it, and obviously hadn't seen one in a while. I don't think they're standard of care these days.

post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

Yes. I got a pump with dd2, because I requested it. (I HATE duramorph.) The nurses on the maternity ward were all boggled by it, and obviously hadn't seen one in a while. I don't think they're standard of care these days.


Duramorph makes me itch so bad I'm completely miserable. It's horrible.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexisT View Post

Not necessarily. Spinal yes, but many anesthesiologists put Duramorph or another long lasting narcotic in the spinal, no PCA. There are anesthesiologists who prefer epidural or CSE, which would allow PCEA, but even though I had an epi for my first (attempted CSE) they did not use a pump. I got diamorphine. Second was a spinal with Duramorph and then IV Toradol.


I got a choice between a spinal or an epidural. I had an epidural with my first and chose a spinal with the second. I actually prefer the epidural. If I had another that is what I would request. Just personal preference. They both have their advantages and disadvantages.

 

post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

Yes. I got a pump with dd2, because I requested it. (I HATE duramorph.) The nurses on the maternity ward were all boggled by it, and obviously hadn't seen one in a while. I don't think they're standard of care these days.



IIRC there was a study showing that using a long-acting narcotic in the spinal offered better pain relief with a lower dose than IV PCA, so it's preferred by many anesthesiologists. I do know hospitals where they use IV PCA or PCEA. When I went for my pre-op, they mentioned IV PCA, but the anesthesiologist I got on the day preferred Duramorph. I am one of the poster cases for long acting narcotics (even with getting it in my epi, which has a higher rate of side effects, I was just fine) so I was okay with that, but (speaking in general, not to you SB) if you've reacted to Duramorph in the past, tell the anesthesiologist. The itching and nausea is usually a side effect or pseudoallergy, not a true allergy, and this effect varies depending on the specific opioid given.

post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexisT View Post



IIRC there was a study showing that using a long-acting narcotic in the spinal offered better pain relief with a lower dose than IV PCA, so it's preferred by many anesthesiologists. I do know hospitals where they use IV PCA or PCEA. When I went for my pre-op, they mentioned IV PCA, but the anesthesiologist I got on the day preferred Duramorph. I am one of the poster cases for long acting narcotics (even with getting it in my epi, which has a higher rate of side effects, I was just fine) so I was okay with that, but (speaking in general, not to you SB) if you've reacted to Duramorph in the past, tell the anesthesiologist. The itching and nausea is usually a side effect or pseudoallergy, not a true allergy, and this effect varies depending on the specific opioid given.



I did forget to mention that dispute the itching side effect, the pain relief of the long acting narcotic in my spinal was amazing. It really did a very good job with the pain.

post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexisT View Post



IIRC there was a study showing that using a long-acting narcotic in the spinal offered better pain relief with a lower dose than IV PCA, so it's preferred by many anesthesiologists. I do know hospitals where they use IV PCA or PCEA. When I went for my pre-op, they mentioned IV PCA, but the anesthesiologist I got on the day preferred Duramorph. I am one of the poster cases for long acting narcotics (even with getting it in my epi, which has a higher rate of side effects, I was just fine) so I was okay with that, but (speaking in general, not to you SB) if you've reacted to Duramorph in the past, tell the anesthesiologist. The itching and nausea is usually a side effect or pseudoallergy, not a true allergy, and this effect varies depending on the specific opioid given.



It's not just the itching (which did almost drive me crazy). I hate the duramorph, because of the level of pain management. I haven't found anything that completely kills the pain, but the way duramorph works is counterproductive for me. I actually tore out a staple after my third c-section, which prevented my incision from closing/healing promptly, which resulted in an infection. It happened mostly because the oh-so-effective pain management caused me to misjudge what I was capable of, until I'd already pushed past the safe point (climbing into bed). I just can't stand the stuff. I don't really want a lot of pain management post-op, though. I want the minimum I need to be able to sleep, and a bit of a boost when I first get out of bed, and that's about it.

post #29 of 31

My second c/s was much easier than my first. I wasn't exhausted by labor, I was emotionally prepared, and I knew what to expect.  I had an appropriate birth plan in place (this was a big one - with my first I only had a plan for a successful unmedicated water birth.  I had no idea what to ask for in the event of surgery and my subsequent infection and prolonged hospital stay.) The delivery itself was much more calm and peaceful and I had my baby in my arms within minutes instead of hours.  Nursing went smoothly, we managed my pain well so I was never uncomfortable, I got a decent amount of rest. I felt pretty good almost immediately and "normal" within a couple of weeks.

 

I do think not having gone through a very long and traumatic labor had to have contributed to my good recovery but I think the emotional component was also very important.  My first c/s was like getting hit by a Mac truck emotionally. I felt like a terrible failure as a woman and a mother.  The second c/s wasn't what I would have choosen in a perfect world but I did feel a lot more in control.  Despite being a surgery in an OR it was joyful occasion.  The hospital staff were very respectful and followed my plan to the letter.  I was able to mother my baby exactly as I would have chosen and that really helped with the healing.

post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by JollyGG View Post

Oh goodness, the difference between my planned and unplanned c-section were night and day. My planned recover was so so much easier.

 

I had 24 hours of labor with the first, delivered late at night and so didn't get out of be till morning when I had had a chance to get really stiff. Even walking to the bathroom was excruciating for the first couple of days.

 

With my second, I asked to shower as soon as I could feel my feet. I was up walking the halls and doing fantastic.

 

Some of it was that I knew what to expect, but I think a lot of it was that I didn't go through labor.

 

They really were very different. The planned c-section was a breeze compared to the unplanned.


THIS.  This was my experience exactly as well.  I'll be having another planned section in 6 weeks, I expect recovery to be much easier than with my first, emergency section.

 

post #31 of 31

i've only had emergency c-births but i do know a few mamas who had planned repeats and every one of them found the scheduled one a gentler recovery.

 

but there are so many factors. i recovered really quickly from my first, and i wonder if it is partly because i did get fully dilated (ds was a preemie and presented kneeling-footling breech) before i was operated on. i was literally up and walking around within 4hrs and took no pain meds at all. wish my second had been so smooth!

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