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Gross motor planning delays..advice needed!

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

DD is turning 4 years old next month.  She has some pretty significant  gross motor planning delays, which really give her trouble doing day to day activities.  She has severe social anxiety, selective mutism, and not being able to do what the other kids do at the park really does contribute to the anxiety.  She can't climb ladders, she's very clumsy.

 

She has been diagnosed with SPD (non-sensory seeking) and the developmental ped said it's too early for an Asperger's diagnosis, but that it was probable.  This was awhile back, a year or so ago.  They put her name in the waiitng list for a developmental playgroup but we never were called back.

 

I just had her do some things... she..

 

-cannot jump and be in one place, she jumps and lands somewhere else, no matter how hard she tries

-cannot stand on one foot (either foot) unless it is in hoppping

-cannot hop on one foot more than twice

-cannot walk toe-to-heel along a 4 foot line without falling midway through

-she also still does not know how to pedal a bike- she still can't grasp it.

 

There are several other things, like I said, it affects her day-to-day.  Her balance is horrible and getting her dressed is a challenge because she falls over when I put her head through her shirt.

 

She's also pigeon toed, don't know how much that has to do with things.

 

We've been given the wait and see approach for everything.  Her little sister will be 2 next month and is starting to do the things that she can't.. so I'm worried.

 

Are there any games that would be helpful for her?  We have an Xbox Kinect that we never use- they have that Kinectimals game... could that be of any benefit?  She doesn't watch TV and we're in the "waldorfy" bunch, but I'm not opposed to that if it will help some.

post #2 of 9

I'm not sure about at home activities but I'll give a huge thumbs up to swimming. Another one that helped my DD1 with her fine motor skills and then DS1's PT suggested it for his gross motor issues was gymnastics. Very low key gymnastics, we take it through a rec center or go to the open gym they offer that is cheap. His PT has meet us there in the past and showed me exercises on the different equipment to help him. We've known several children that have gone solely for the gross motor skills, one girl in DD2's class last year had a difficult time walking and could not run and her mom used it to help with many of the things you mentioned, she was 4 as well. 

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peony View Post

I'm not sure about at home activities but I'll give a huge thumbs up to swimming. Another one that helped my DD1 with her fine motor skills and then DS1's PT suggested it for his gross motor issues was gymnastics. Very low key gymnastics, we take it through a rec center or go to the open gym they offer that is cheap. His PT has meet us there in the past and showed me exercises on the different equipment to help him. We've known several children that have gone solely for the gross motor skills, one girl in DD2's class last year had a difficult time walking and could not run and her mom used it to help with many of the things you mentioned, she was 4 as well. 



Thanks!  She has an aversion to water and tried gymnastics but the social anxiety got the best of her :(  She has told me she never wants to go back.  Maybe a different gym would work.

 

post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peony View Post

I'm not sure about at home activities but I'll give a huge thumbs up to swimming. Another one that helped my DD1 with her fine motor skills and then DS1's PT suggested it for his gross motor issues was gymnastics. Very low key gymnastics, we take it through a rec center or go to the open gym they offer that is cheap. His PT has meet us there in the past and showed me exercises on the different equipment to help him. We've known several children that have gone solely for the gross motor skills, one girl in DD2's class last year had a difficult time walking and could not run and her mom used it to help with many of the things you mentioned, she was 4 as well. 

Ditto this.

 

We did not swim as much as we should have since we did not have easy access to a pool, but DDs PT really really stressed how good it would be.

 


A few other things we did"

 

gymnastics! She loved it, it did take a second try at a different gym and a small class when no other things were going on in the gym (10 am class). BUT she loved the new teacher, the class was small (6) and the gym was otherwise quiet (unlike night classes).

 

Horsebackriding-- we can not afford it and DD does not qualify for spec. needs. , but it is something that again has been suggested by OT/PT.

 

Dance. Again- we did a low key dance (no recital) class. FABULOUS teacher, completely low-no stress. Kids waved scarved, moved the to  music, stretched, etc. It was great

 

At home:

 

BEST things we got was  small trampoline with  a balance bar. It is small and fits in our living room. DD could not jump well, balance well, etc. The trampoline served as a SPD and a gross motor tool that she loved!

 

YOGA- we did the Yoga kids DVD. and DD loved it. It was geared toward small kiddos with songs, animals, etc. Lots of fun and easy to do at home.

 

Dance: we often put on music and dance, got her moving

 

trike/bike" at 6 DD still can not ride a bike, but mastered a trike at 4.5. She does not love it, but will use it. We also have a scooter--which is more fun and uses her core muscles

 

Tape--- I put masking tape on the floor and we practiced walking in it, laying on it, jumping over/on it, lots of fun

 

Moon shoes (yes they are plastic) that were suggested by OT/PT for both sensory and gross motor. She did not like them at first, but really got used to them. A lot of help was initially needed so she did not fall, but she really got good!

 

 

HTH!

 

 

post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by KCMichigan View Post


Dance. Again- we did a low key dance (no recital) class. FABULOUS teacher, completely low-no stress. Kids waved scarved, moved the to  music, stretched, etc. It was great

 

 

 


 

You might see if the parks and rec program where you live has classes. That was the best fit for my DD when she was little because is was smaller and mellower than the commercial places.

 

Gymnastics tends to happen in a HUGE place with lots of classes going on at once, dance is a small room with just one teacher and a smaller group of kids. Much better fit for my sensory kiddo.

 

Outside is always better than inside for my DD, and I'm guessing that outdoor options are pretty limited where you are for the next few months. Definitely try to the Kinet. Any movement is good, and the more if feels like a fun game, the better.

 

My younger child also passed up my older child in some areas and that was tough. None the less, having a neuro typical younger sib has been fabulous for my DD's social development. Keep reminding yourself that their spacing is perfect, there is a reason.

 

 

post #6 of 9

This may not be available/accessible to you, but therapeutic horseback riding can address some of the concerns you have.  I know it's a long shot, but just putting it out there should you ever have the chance.

post #7 of 9

 I have one spectrum and one SPD child, and they take gymnastics at our local gym that is a special needs class.  There are just my two and one other child, and they take their class in the back gym on Friday afternoons when things are quieter.  Our gym is awesome and does not charge any extra for this either.  We have been going there for 3.5 years now, and my older two are finally almost able to do a cartwheel (I never could!).  Could you call the gym or park district and explain your daughter's situation and see what they say?  Maybe they would be willing to put her in a special needs class, or at a time when the gym is less crowded?  Gymnastics has done wonders for strength and coordination for my older two, and I just started a toddler/mom class with my youngest (I suspect she is at least SPD, if not also on the spectrum).  Plus, if nothing else, the trampoline time sure does help with getting that sensory input they need! :)

post #8 of 9

Subbing. My 3 year old has very low muscle tone, and some sort of connective tissue disorder (not yet diagnosed), as well as being legally blind. She has a lot of the same delays your daughter does; she can't jump or hop at all, is unbalanced and weak, can't walk up stairs, etc.  She just aged out of EI, so we're not getting weekly PT anymore, but she is in a great pre-school were she is very active all day.  We just try to keep her active, and practice the things that are hard for her (stairs, jumping, getting dressed) at home.  I would love to have more options!

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thank you everyone for the awesome advice.  I think a trampoline would be great- we do have the space for it.  I like the tape idea too.. I've been doing this with ribbon.  The gymnastics she was in had two classes going on at once, on different floors.  Her class was about 8-10 kids, plus the teacher.  I may try having her there again in the spring.  I know they are a bit supportive of special needs.  A family friend has a son with low muscle tone, and he is allowed to wear his shoes with the inserts in class, and the instructors are great with him.
 
Oh, and she loves to dance.  She falls over and everything, but loves it more than anything else!
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