or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Pregnancy and Birth › Birth and Beyond › Homebirth › It's Possibly Going to be a Breech Homebirth
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

It's Possibly Going to be a Breech Homebirth - Page 2

post #21 of 61

Just because people say something in a lot of places online doesn't mean it's not true, and doesn't mean it's not OK to say it on MDC.  

 

I think it's great that some women have had footling breech deliveries and their babies are fine.  However, there is no management technique for footling breech deliveries that will keep the umbilical cord from being compressed, or guarantee that the cervix is sufficiently dilated to allow the baby's head to pass through.  Research is not a magic talisman that makes your body behave the way you want it to.  A midwife's experience is not a forcefield protecting an umbilical cord.  The safety of a baby in a footling breech presentation during vaginal delivery comes down to luck.  Personally, I wouldn't choose it.  Other people are more comfortable with luck.  Other people have been lucky.  

 

There's also a story in this thread about a woman who wasn't lucky at all.  She had personal, spiritual reasons for staying out of the hospital, but I don't think she was stupid, and I don't think she was out of shape or unhealthy or unprepared for labor, and it's my hope that she had a skilled and compassionate midwife - I have no reason to believe she didn't.  Her tragedy happened because even the world's greatest midwife and the world's healthiest, most-informed mom can't reliably make a footling breech baby come out right.  

 

You interpret the blessingway photos differently than I do, and while you haven't commented on the Term Breech Trial, I'm guessing that you don't feel it's convincing in re. the safety of c-section birth over vaginal delivery for breech babies.  I think it makes a pretty clear case for the benefits of c-sections for breech delivery.  I don't feel half so strongly about frank breech babies, where the presenting part is often the same size as the head, as I do about footling breech.  Clearly, I feel pretty strongly about footling breech presentations.  Clearly you do too.  I think the best possibility would be for the OP's baby to turn.  

 

When my own dd was breech at 37 weeks (which wasn't for long - she doesn't appear to have had strong feelings about it), and I desperately wanted to avoid a c-section, I found the information on spinningbabies.com very helpful.  For some reason, having her head-up was really hard on my lower back - I got one of my martial arts teachers to help me with some wall-assisted yoga poses that provided a lot of relief and I think might have helped her flip.  I wouldn't recommend joining a martial arts class at 38 weeks, but a prenatal yoga teacher might have some helpful suggestions.  

post #22 of 61

Well... of COURSE it has to do with luck.  Even when the odds are way in your favor, you could still have very bad luck in birth.  

 

I think the point people are trying to make is that when you have a footling breech, your odds are a lot WORSE of having good luck.  

 

I am a bit perplexed by the "variation from the "norm"" ideas because-- variation from the norm would mean "abnormal."  Homebirth is as safe as hospital for LOW RISK women who are having "normal" pregnancies-- not high risk women with a lot of "variation" going on (as in, abnormal positioning that increases the risk of cord prolapse which is a VERY bad thing to happen.  An extremely very bad thing, that can completely happen.  It COULD happen in any pregnancy, you are right that no birth is risk-free-- but there are DEGREES of risk and it is a lot MORE likely that a cord prolapse would happen in certain situations, surely you know this already?).
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BroodyWoodsgal View Post


Exactly. They SEEM. To YOU. <----- This is the exact reason I'm being so persnickety with you. The OP asked for information worth considering, positive birth stories...you know, a departure from the "regular" on the internet, when it comes to a lady expressing a desire to deliver breech at home. Instead, you gave her exactly what she could expect to get if she went anywhere on the internet: your negative feedback, based on a personal feeling that footling breech deliveries are "all about luck".

 

You even went so far as to tell a lady who, in keeping with the original request by the thread starter, shared her positive PERSONAL experience....that while you are happy that she had a positive outcome, it was sheer dumb luck that delivered her child safely and, you know, NOT DEAD, to her and not her own preparation and birthing, her skilled team of midwives and her research on the subject. Basically, you said "had luck blown a different way that day, your MW and preparation couldn't have spared you from tragedy." You attribute her living, healthy child not to the presence of skill and commitment to preparation at her birth....but rather, the absence of bad luck.

 

Sorry, but I'm sick of the number of women who come to the online community of birthers for encouragement and support in preparing for variation from the "norm" only to find harsh fear mongering and shouts of "you're going to kill your baby" that are based on personal feeling and not new information or interesting studies that shed new light on birth issues.

 

If you have compelling new evidence that we're all in the dark about, please, share it. I would LOVE to see it...not even being sarcastic. But the information I've seen thus far, in all the preparation I've done and all the research I've thrown myself into, has only supported my feeling that the prepared, educated mother with skilled and experienced MWs by her side can safely and joyfully welcome a breech baby in the comfort of her own home.

 

There is no risk free birth. It doesn't matter where you go, great position, crappy position...whatever. It's up to all of us to judge risk and go the road that feels best to us. This mother has heard what you've had to say....she's heard it a hundred times. It's all over the internet, in real life, everywhere....she came here and asked for something different, a balance to that wasteland of fear out on the interwebs when it comes to this issue. She has a right to that.

 



 

post #23 of 61

Oh my god you guys. bow2.gif

 

I've totally seen the light. You are completely right. Any baby who is presenting breech should be sectioned, for the risk that the child will present feet first instead of the much hoped for butt first. It just makes sense. Why should I listen to my gut, my stupid research or my skilled midwife....they won't save me when the bad luck of a footling breech baby comes upon me! I should just not try at all for a vaginal delivery and go sign up for a section.

 

Also, I think that because there is a higher risk of placental abruption and uterine rupture for mothers with previous c-sections, we should section ANYONE who has had a c/s before. I mean, it only makes sense, right? Uterine rupture is a very, very bad problem when it happens...so, let's not let that kind of "bad luck" even exist!! MAKE IT A LAW, THEN WE'LL SAVE ALL THE BABIES!!.

 

You know, I'm also starting to have pretty "sketchy" feelings about twin births at home. I think it's just too risky. I mean, the risks involved are more than a bit higher than for a singleton birth....we should consider sectioning ALL twin mamas too. Yeah I know, I know...some "loony toons" type is going to point to all of the lovely, completely safe twin births we've all seen on MDC and all the very skilled, highly experienced in twin birth care providers we know about...but we know better than that, don't we? thumb.gif That's all anecdotal bullcrap that isn't going to save you when twin B is coming out breech, am I right? Am I right!!? Yeah, SECTION 'EM. Just do it.

 

We should start looking at advanced maternal age, too....I'm just not sure we should be comfortable with the risks. Also, obesity. There are a lot of risk factors that go up for women who are heavier. We should really start talking to them too.

 

You know....while we're at it....we should really take a hard look at first time mothers. I mean, look at them....unproven pelvis ticking time bombs of bad luck that COULD happen...wouldn't you say? It may be best to start sectioning EVERYONE who has never had a baby before. I think that's the best way to avoid the risks and "bad luck" associated with birth, entirely....and you know, super double bonus, it would totally show all those cocky little tarts that their research is stupid and worthless and their experienced MWs may as well be monkeys for all the good they do! Nothing like proving to someone that you know what's best for them, eh!?

 

 

I'm really glad I listened to your fact-free, opinion based posts today. I've been changed. You know. Thank you. I think you probably have saved my unborn childs life. I'm so glad that you were here to show me that my prior birth experiences, skilled and experienced MWs, mountains of research and connectedness with myself mean nothing....and that the only truly safe way, is to run screaming from risk, you know, REALLY LET THE FEAR OWN ME...and just go get a section.

 

Oh...and you're right, research and preparedness never helped any mama cope with an unforseen hiccup in hte middle of birth. I'm never going to research ever again. I'm just going to start going to the hospital and having ALL my babies surgically removed from my body, so I can avoid having to feel the crushing guilt of failure if something happens to my baby during birth because I DARED to put myself in a position where any amount of risk could possibly touch me.

 

Man...I feel like I should pay you money or something. blowkiss.gif

post #24 of 61

I take PayPal.

post #25 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by stik View Post

I take PayPal.



clap.gifblowkiss.gifluxlove.gifhug2.gif

post #26 of 61

I wouldn't have a c-section just because there was extra risk to the babies life. as far as I am concerned, I worry more about dying myself from a c-section and leaving my kids motherless than the fear of having a dead baby. I would rather take the 'risks' of a home birth any day over the risks of me having a c-section in a  hospital. now, if the c-section were to save my life, then of course, weighing up the risks of dying without c/s versus risks of dying with c-section, thats how I would make my choice. sorry if this seems completely absurd to most people, but for me, no, having a healthy baby is not the most desirable outcome of birth, its being alive myself to raise my existing children. 

post #27 of 61

All the drama aside, is there no point at which you would believe that one should be risked out of homebirth? 

 

And , for those that are so in love with their own research, why reject any evidence that is contrary to your predetermined choice? You cannot make informed decisions if you reject half the information out there.  

 

 

post #28 of 61

If you have a heart or lung condition, or a blood clotting disorder. If a mama's life is at risk. if a mama is in such bad health that she could die during labour/birth. In africa, where they are circumcised and many have misshapen pelvis' due to poor nutrition. If you have or have previously had anorexia. Im sure there re others but off the top of my head. 

post #29 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamablitz View Post

If you have a heart or lung condition, or a blood clotting disorder. If a mama's life is at risk. if a mama is in such bad health that she could die during labour/birth. In africa, where they are circumcised and many have misshapen pelvis' due to poor nutrition. If you have or have previously had anorexia. Im sure there re others but off the top of my head. 



What about risks to the baby? Inconspicuously missing from the list...

post #30 of 61

My midwives risked me out of their practice when my son was breech at thirty-eight weeks. My OB refused to do a vaginal birth. I love and respect all of these women and I trust them. My OB attempted an external cephalic version, sent me to her chiropractor, gave me a list of herbs to buy, tried in every way to help me turn the baby. She was wonderful. However, I ended up with a c/s and despite not having the homebirth I desired, it was a truly amazing and beautiful experience that I don't regret for a moment. The nurses in the hospital were wonderful and had me breastfeeding within fifteen minutes of giving birth. My son never had a Vitamin K or Hep B shot, wasn't circ'd, didn't have a drop of formula, and nobody said a thing about it. This was at a conservative, mainstream hospital! Yes, I was a little nervous about the c/s, but having spent two years battling infertility, I had no intention of risking my baby. Also, my husband researched the statistics and we realized that it's much more dangerous to drive to the hospital than it is to have a c-section.

 

I'm not posting this to judge anyone's decision (just as I assume that you will not judge mine), but just to provide a different perspective.

post #31 of 61

I always wonder about these posts, when momma's are asking for good stories and encouragement to do a homebirth where risk factors are involved.  All over MDC, people tout "listening to your gut and following your momma insticts."  Maybe if you are nervous and uncertain and require good stories and encouragement to help you go through with something, maybe THAT is your instincts talking.  Maybe if you feel worried, it is because you actually have something to be worried about. 

post #32 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by amma_mama View Post

All the drama aside, is there no point at which you would believe that one should be risked out of homebirth? 

 

And , for those that are so in love with their own research, why reject any evidence that is contrary to your predetermined choice? You cannot make informed decisions if you reject half the information out there.  

 

 



I also cannot reject or accept any evidence that is not given. I mean, I keep hearing "but but the Term Breech Trial!" - and people have voiced their concerns with that evidence and the feeling that it's not worth using as a basis for decision making. But nothing was offered after that, as compelling information to "show me the light" and change my mind. I don't agree with that research being conclusively supportive of (MY) breech birth being too dangerous for home. Even a footling. Period.

 

Do you really think, that I researched breech birth and never came across anything that told me it's dangerous? Most of what I came across told me it's too dangerous for home. Everything from many state laws, to tons of anecdotal sources and doctors out the hooha have screamed at me that it's dangerous. But, when I really come to a proper evaluation of those sources, I find that many of the people who think and voice that opinion are basing that opinion on REPEATED opinions. So, when I cancelled out all of those voices which were merely repeating what they were told....I found a smaller body of evidence supporting the claim that it's "too dangerous" to be done at home. When I really looked closely at THAT body of evidence, I simply wasn't able to come to the same conclusions that the doctors and researchers did. I feel the studies I have reviewed have been flawed or are missing huge aspects which are important to me. 

 

My choices and views on breech birth were not PREdetermined. I went into my research on breech birth TRULY seeking information. My beliefs were determined when I reached a reasonable conclusion to "my own research". Of course I can reject half the information our there...I've GOT to reject half the information out there, if I'm going to make any choice at ALL....doesn't that make sense? I gathered information, I spoke with people, I read, I hit the interwebs and dug around there...and at the end of all of that, I chose to go with "I'm cool with breech birth at home" - in order to comfortably arrive at that conclusion, it's only natural that I would have to reject some of the "evidence" I came across which was meant to point toward HB for breech babies as too dangerous for consideration. How can I make a decision either way, without at some point deciding that I DON'T AGREE with, and therefore cannot use as a basis for my decision making, some of the information I've come across? I'm not rejecting the study that you fine posters have pointed to because it doesn't fit with my view....I'm rejecting it as information I've already reviewed and didn't deem as "good enough" for basing my decision (re: HB or C/S) on. That study was "rejected" by me long before the existence of this post.

 

The specific and valid need of the OP and, I believe, many women who are planning to HB in spite of "risk factors" that other people deem "too great" for out of hospital births...is the presence of positive stories and support to balance out the unending waves of negative opinions, protests of "well well, but you know your baby could DIE, right!??" - and otherwise unhelpful and unsupportive, opinion and/or flawed research based sentiment. You guys keep saying "you rally need to consider this, this is a serious decision to make" - like she doesn't know that. The OP knows that full well....she simply stated, that she is ready to receive some positive stories now, that she is ready for balance to that great negative tidal wave out there. I think she has a right to that. She is not going blindly into this. None of us are. We're all here with our eyes open...we're not closing them when something we "don't want to see" comes into view. We're, or at least I am, are constantly seeking new information, eagerly digesting new facts and ideas as they come to light, to gut check our beliefs and make sure we're still on the same page with reality.

 

 

post #33 of 61

Another thought...and you can think I'm stupid or whatever....but this matters to me:

 

I think it is particularly important to note that we researching mamas, viewing the data that researchers pull together to support their claims, have ABSOLUTELY no idea about various contributing factors to do with the test subjects. I have no idea WHERE the women in these studies were(yeah, okay, the home or hospital.....but WHAT hospital? Does it look like a prison in there, as some do, or is it one of the newer designs, where things look more homey? WHAT house? A safe and clean home....or the same home where this mother lost a baby in the past or was beat up by her husband?? I don't know??). I have no idea how scared they were. I have no idea how supported, or not supported by positive, calm birth workers they were. I don't know how many of those women had experienced prior birth trauma that caused them to go into labor in a cripplingly fearful state. I have no idea how many of them were SO scared when they were told "This baby is presenting butt/feet/whatever first!" that they immediately panicked and thought "my baby is going to die". I don't know how many of those women were given drugs and which drugs they were given. Hell, I don't know if they hated their doctor, hated their body, hated their husbands guts (you know, the guy sitting next to them, holding their hand through all of this) - there are SO many things I don't know about the women in these studies, that it's not even funny. All I can do, is the MATH. The MATH tells me, that most of these women were raised in a society that teaches women to fear birth. The MATH tells me that most of these women were being supported at least in part, by a husband who has an EVEN FUZZIER idea of what birth actually is, about how normal it is, etc. ....and **I** know, that none of the things I just mentioned above: fear, past trauma, bad birth support team, misinformation about breech presentation, etc...NONE of those things applies to me.

 

I'm sorry, but anyone who would try and sit up and say that those things have no bearing on outcomes...is out of her mind and has absolutely no idea what birth is about. The way a woman FEELS going into birth, is not just resting in her heartspace. Heart space is indeed important....but even more than that, the way a woman feels about her birthing going into it, mid way through it, etc...has a direct PHYSIOLOGICAL effect on her body and her birthing. CANNOT be denied.

 

We cannot sit and prepare ourselves to be In Birth...and do all that we do, to work on feeling peaceful instead of fearful, calm and supported instead of alone and afraid, etc...we can't sit here and do all of this to prepare our minds for successful births...and then pretend that the head and heart space of test subjects or women whose birth outcomes were used as statistical data...had no bearing on the outcomes that were used to support whatever theory.

 

I like what Ina May Gaskin has to say about variations of normal. Sure, sure...there is no vast compilation of data (and I'm not saying I don't look at the hard numbers and vast compilations of data, I DO) to compare the safety of this to that, etc.....but what she does offer, in many cases, is the different mind sets of women who encountered certain problems, things she did, not only to get a baby "unstuck" or make sure that butt-first/toes-first baby made it out safe...but also to meet the mother in her unique head space and bring her through the experience too, in a way that allowed her body to continue to work how it should. At least, when I'm reading a book of HER birth stories....I know that many of the women have had similar exposure to birth, are coming from a similar place as I am. I know these women were in competent, experienced hands. I get a glimpse at more than their outcomes, their "numbers"...I get to see their whole thought process and how things unfolded for them. I get to read their own post birth analysis, and sometimes Ina Mays too, of everything that went down and how they were effected and what "got in their way", etc.

 

Ina May Gaskin is not what I base my decisions on. Her lifes work is impressive, but doesn't even make up a fraction of my research base. But it is my FAVORITE fraction of my research base, because I feel that the studies, while they may be one individual birth at a time, at least give a whole picture, a more accurate representation.

 

If I was faced with a breech baby, I would either go it alone (UC) or would go to the next state over (as my MW cannot deliver me, breech, in this state legally) or would have another MW I know who doesn't really care about the legality of it (who is very experienced in breech delivery, having trained mostly in Pennsylvania amongst the Mennonites)...but I'd do one of those things long before I would walk into an OBs office and sign up for a c/s. That's just so outside the realm of possibility for me. On so many levels. In my mind, my heart and my spirit, it is not the right move for me. I do not suggest that MY beliefs should mean a damn thing to anyone else...but I also resent my beliefs being seen as reckless or stupid.

post #34 of 61

Just a reminder that we do require our members to treat each other with respect and disagree - when they do - with civil exchange of opinion. If you can't do so I'll have to close your access to the forum.

post #35 of 61

Okey dokey Amma Mamma, the answer to your question is in the first post I made in this thread. read it. It says, to sum up, that I believe a mother's life takes priority over her baby's life. people may think that it is crazy, but I am more afraid of dying during a C/S than I am of having a dead or injured baby. my kids need a mother. so does a new baby. The only way I would have a C/S is if there was greater possibility of me dying during vaginal birth than having a C/S. I take into consideration my history of anaphylaxis and effect of pain meds on my heart. also the risks of catching MRSA and having a poor quality of life or dying. 

post #36 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamablitz View Post

Okey dokey Amma Mamma, the answer to your question is in the first post I made in this thread. read it. It says, to sum up, that I believe a mother's life takes priority over her baby's life. people may think that it is crazy, but I am more afraid of dying during a C/S than I am of having a dead or injured baby. my kids need a mother. so does a new baby. The only way I would have a C/S is if there was greater possibility of me dying during vaginal birth than having a C/S. I take into consideration my history of anaphylaxis and effect of pain meds on my heart. also the risks of catching MRSA and having a poor quality of life or dying. 


So, you would only have a c-section if you were going to die during vaginal delivery?  You make it sound like c-sections always lead to death.

 

post #37 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by WildKingdom View Post


So, you would only have a c-section if you were going to die during vaginal delivery?  You make it sound like c-sections always lead to death.

 



Or that a hospital birth = c-section. Far from the truth. This is no less fear mongering than those who say that all homebirths or UCs will end in death. I am supportive of both homebirths and UCs but there has to be some recognition that some cases are best dealt with in a hospital where the proper equipment and staff are available. 

post #38 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by BroodyWoodsgal View Post

Another thought...and you can think I'm stupid or whatever....but this matters to me:

 

I think it is particularly important to note that we researching mamas, viewing the data that researchers pull together to support their claims, have ABSOLUTELY no idea about various contributing factors to do with the test subjects. I have no idea WHERE the women in these studies were(yeah, okay, the home or hospital.....but WHAT hospital? Does it look like a prison in there, as some do, or is it one of the newer designs, where things look more homey? WHAT house? A safe and clean home....or the same home where this mother lost a baby in the past or was beat up by her husband?? I don't know??). I have no idea how scared they were. I have no idea how supported, or not supported by positive, calm birth workers they were. I don't know how many of those women had experienced prior birth trauma that caused them to go into labor in a cripplingly fearful state. I have no idea how many of them were SO scared when they were told "This baby is presenting butt/feet/whatever first!" that they immediately panicked and thought "my baby is going to die". I don't know how many of those women were given drugs and which drugs they were given. Hell, I don't know if they hated their doctor, hated their body, hated their husbands guts (you know, the guy sitting next to them, holding their hand through all of this) - there are SO many things I don't know about the women in these studies, that it's not even funny. All I can do, is the MATH. The MATH tells me, that most of these women were raised in a society that teaches women to fear birth. The MATH tells me that most of these women were being supported at least in part, by a husband who has an EVEN FUZZIER idea of what birth actually is, about how normal it is, etc. ....and **I** know, that none of the things I just mentioned above: fear, past trauma, bad birth support team, misinformation about breech presentation, etc...NONE of those things applies to me.

 

I'm sorry, but anyone who would try and sit up and say that those things have no bearing on outcomes...is out of her mind and has absolutely no idea what birth is about. The way a woman FEELS going into birth, is not just resting in her heartspace. Heart space is indeed important....but even more than that, the way a woman feels about her birthing going into it, mid way through it, etc...has a direct PHYSIOLOGICAL effect on her body and her birthing. CANNOT be denied.

 

We cannot sit and prepare ourselves to be In Birth...and do all that we do, to work on feeling peaceful instead of fearful, calm and supported instead of alone and afraid, etc...we can't sit here and do all of this to prepare our minds for successful births...and then pretend that the head and heart space of test subjects or women whose birth outcomes were used as statistical data...had no bearing on the outcomes that were used to support whatever theory.

 

I like what Ina May Gaskin has to say about variations of normal. Sure, sure...there is no vast compilation of data (and I'm not saying I don't look at the hard numbers and vast compilations of data, I DO) to compare the safety of this to that, etc.....but what she does offer, in many cases, is the different mind sets of women who encountered certain problems, things she did, not only to get a baby "unstuck" or make sure that butt-first/toes-first baby made it out safe...but also to meet the mother in her unique head space and bring her through the experience too, in a way that allowed her body to continue to work how it should. At least, when I'm reading a book of HER birth stories....I know that many of the women have had similar exposure to birth, are coming from a similar place as I am. I know these women were in competent, experienced hands. I get a glimpse at more than their outcomes, their "numbers"...I get to see their whole thought process and how things unfolded for them. I get to read their own post birth analysis, and sometimes Ina Mays too, of everything that went down and how they were effected and what "got in their way", etc.

 

Ina May Gaskin is not what I base my decisions on. Her lifes work is impressive, but doesn't even make up a fraction of my research base. But it is my FAVORITE fraction of my research base, because I feel that the studies, while they may be one individual birth at a time, at least give a whole picture, a more accurate representation.

 

If I was faced with a breech baby, I would either go it alone (UC) or would go to the next state over (as my MW cannot deliver me, breech, in this state legally) or would have another MW I know who doesn't really care about the legality of it (who is very experienced in breech delivery, having trained mostly in Pennsylvania amongst the Mennonites)...but I'd do one of those things long before I would walk into an OBs office and sign up for a c/s. That's just so outside the realm of possibility for me. On so many levels. In my mind, my heart and my spirit, it is not the right move for me. I do not suggest that MY beliefs should mean a damn thing to anyone else...but I also resent my beliefs being seen as reckless or stupid.


I do not think that anybody accused you of being reckless or stupid. You have clearly done your fair share of research, but a lot of people here on MDC rely on what other posters say, which is not, in itself, objective research, especially when posters with other views are silenced for not being sufficiently "supportive". I think we all want the same outcomes - a healthy mother and baby. It should be recognized that there ARE reasons to risk out of a homebirth. And nobody here said that all breech births are equally dangerous. Some are more more dangerous than others for the baby and that should be taken into consideration in making a decision on where to birth and what interventions, if any, to accept.

 

And making a decision one way or the other does not require one to out and out reject the arguments on the other side. In this case, there is evidence on both sides. Some footling breech homebirths end well,while many others do not. Maternal health, knowledge and midwife experience are variables but are not guarantees of one outcome over another. At the end of the day, we all have to make decisions that we feel that we can live with. 

post #39 of 61
post #40 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by amma_mama View Post



Or that a hospital birth = c-section. Far from the truth. This is no less fear mongering than those who say that all homebirths or UCs will end in death. I am supportive of both homebirths and UCs but there has to be some recognition that some cases are best dealt with in a hospital where the proper equipment and staff are available. 


I just want to point out, that for many women who are in the same position as the OP, it IS a choice between HOME and a C/S. If I found out my current baking baby was breech....a vaginal birth in the hospital would simply NOT be an option. It does. NOT. happen. in. my. state. Period. So...I'd be forced to go UC, go to the next state over with MW, or go with a skilled MW who is in my state and is angry about the laws and so, has been known to handle some breech HBs for women she knows. But I don't think that last option would work for me, because I don't know what added layer of emotional "stuff" comes with skirting the law like that, you know? That could add a whole different level of "stuff" in that MWs mind, to do with liability (criminal and otherwise) and any other number of factors. Should something go wrong in a situation like that, say even something so bad as a baby dying...it goes from being a tragedy or potential malpractice lawsuit, to being a straight up criminal issue...manslaughter charges, whatever else. I don't need that swimming in my MWs mind. You know? Going the next state over with a competent, skilled midwife seems like a good idea...until you consider that with my first birth I went from "ohhh, I think that was an ACTUAL contraction!" to "look at her little chin!! She's beautiful!" - in exactly 1 hour and 57 minutes. With my second...it was 1 hour and 37 minutes from painful contraction #1, to holding a baby. The drive to the state line is a solid hour....once I cross the state line, I still have another 45 minutes AT LEAST to go, to get to the MW who would be assisting me. That sounds like a recipe for a UC breech birth... "automobile style" - I'm all set.

 

So, if this baby were breech...my ACTUAL options would be a c-section...or a shaky MW situation....or a UC car birth. Or....a UC. I won't get a section for a breech baby. Period. So, I guess that would be a UC baby. How comfortable with that am I?? More comfortable than being wheeled into the OR.

 

Some of us live in states where it is easy to find someone who will come to your home and deliver a baby that others would not. Some of us live in states where you can go to a birth center attached to a hospital and they will let you attempt a breech delivery (VERY uncommon these days, but it still happens sometimes). Most of us live in states where Breech homebirth is restricted, as far as who can legally attend...and almost ALL of us, live in states where there is simply not an OB who can deliver you in a hospital, vaginally, for a breech baby. Period.

 

Them's some crummy choices.
 

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Homebirth
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Pregnancy and Birth › Birth and Beyond › Homebirth › It's Possibly Going to be a Breech Homebirth