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How many spoken words at 1 year old?

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
My baby toddler (sigh) is one today and she can say more than 30 words. I know this doesn't mean she's gifted but I'm curious. From what I've read, gifted children are normally quite early OR quite late talkers. When did yours start talking? How many words could they say at 1 year old?

A reference book I have states that 90% of children say less than 5 words at one.
post #2 of 35

My eldest had no words at age 1. Five words at age 2. Spoke in paragraphs at a four-year-old level by age 2.5. She's HG/PG, with verbal intelligence as her strongest area.

 

Miranda

post #3 of 35

Mine are not tested, but FWIW

 

One of my DD1 had at least 10 signs and 10-15 words, other DD2 had less than 5 words and 10 signs.

 

DD1: slightly early  talker, did not babble much

 

DD2: late to average talker, but with odd speech patterns (echolalia, sentence structure), made lots of sounds- even once talking

 

NOW:

 

DD1: above average verbal language skills

DD2: way above average verbal language skills

 

 

Also, both DD had delayed gross motor skills but both were very early readers.

 

I , think, like most things-- it varies widely and you will read about people will all sorts of experiences.

 

post #4 of 35

My kids are moderately (ds) to highly gifted (dd) (neither is profoundly gifted) with language as their strong point. Both were absolutely typical in terms of first words. Each had one word at about age 1. Neither had a vocabulary spurt until 18-20 months. Both then went on to have very high rates of vocabulary learning.

 

I'm always a little leery of saying that my kids' vocabulary is what makes them gifted. There's strong research to support the idea that environment plays a huge role in development of vocabulary. I'm a linguist and a professor. My kids hear lots of words, and many unusual words much more often than their peers do. Dd, in particular, has an amazing vocabulary because she reads constantly and she seems to absorb words from reading.

 

But vocab isn't what makes my kids gifted -- it's more what they can do with that vocabulary. Ds has been ahead of his peers in terms of being able to make puns and verbal jokes. Just the other day ds complained "the kids at school don't get most of my jokes". He can find a loop hole in instructions or ambiguity in an explanation faster than anyone I know (except my husband). I keep telling him to save for law school. Dd has very high reading and writing skills and her ability to use language creatively and persuasively is amazing for her age. She also is extremely verbose -- she's in 2nd grade and they were writing about what they were thankful for. Her teacher had to stop her after 20 paragraphs. (The average 2nd grader is doing about 1 paragraph.)

 

Now, I'm not saying that a 1 year old with 30 words isn't gifted. Clearly she has far more words than the average one year old, and certainly more words than my kids did. There's a good chance that she will be verbally gifted. But for now, I'd worry less about giftedness and just enjoy the fact that she's beginning to communicate meaningfully. It's so much fun to watch their language grow!

post #5 of 35

I'd stopped counting words by the time my eldest turned 1. She was speaking in full sentences by that point. My youngest didn't have any words on his first birthday. He started a little later than average... maybe 19 or 20 months? He moved straight to sentences with a very adult vocabulary though. Both scored in the 99.9th percentile.

 

 

 

 

post #6 of 35

DS had only 5 words when he turned a year. At 17 months he had over 500, was talking in 4 and 5 word sentences, and starting to use words like because, but, and since.  For DS, he has hit cognitive and verbal milestones early, but what has really stood out is the speed at which he acquires new knowledge or skills.   For example, after no real interest in letters he became interested all of a sudden at 22 month and then learned all letters upper and lower case and the sounds they make in 3 days.  1 month later he was sounding out small words. 

 

30 words at 12 months seems like a lot to me.  And I would bet that you will see a quick leap to word combinations and sentences in the next few months.

post #7 of 35

my oldest dd had about 10 words by her first birthday but was signing quite a bit. then ds (30 months apart) didn't speak until he was almost 4 and then it was sudden and very clear and concise, up until that point his words were 'ursh' for 'nurse',  "Ma', and 'eesh' for everything else.

dd 2  (4 years later) was speaking in full sentences by 18 months. Now, my littlest is 15 mos. and he is very, very quiet and has no words. The thing is, he (much like my ds1) understands and has a great understanding of receptive language and can follow direction and task, but does not speak. I have no concerns, he has 3 older siblings at his beck and call as well LOL.  

post #8 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by stohelit View Post

When did yours start talking? How many words could they say at 1 year old?


 

 

I honestly have no idea at this point. This is one of those questions that makes me feel like a bad mother because I don't think I ever bothered to count, or if I did at the time, I didn't record it for posterity in a memorial book so it's lost in the mists of time and the blur of raising a family, attending a full-time professional post-grad university program and working part-time. 

 

I can say that neither child had any significant, noticeable delay in speech. I don't think they stood out  particularly one way or the other. 

 

FWIW, DS is globally gifted, almost equal on all scales, and DD tested quite a bit stronger on the verbal scale, but blows me away with what she does in spatial, non-verbal stuff in real life. 

 

 

 


Edited by ollyoxenfree - 12/13/11 at 7:42am
post #9 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamabearsoblessed View Post

Now, my littlest is 15 mos. and he is very, very quiet and has no words. The thing is, he (much like my ds1) understands and has a great understanding of receptive language and can follow direction and task, but does not speak. 


Although I don't recall much about my kids' expressive speech acquisition - the number of words spoken at various ages - I do recall many people commenting about DS's receptive language abilities and multi-tasking abilities. As a toddler, he would often be deeply absorbed in a conversation while working on a task that required his attention (i.e. splitting his attention), and then suddenly turn around participate in another conversation in such a way that made it clear he had also been following it all along at the same time. 

 

 

 

post #10 of 35

My DD wasn't speaking at all at 1 year.  No words.  In fact, by age 17 months she said maybe three words (mama, dada, and book), so I called the public health nurse to do a home visit to evaluate her speech (our family has a history of severe speech disorder problems).  By the time the appointment rolled around a month later, DD was speaking 300+ words in sentences, including using words like "otherwise."  She literally went from 3 to 300 in a month.  She just exploded.  She's almost 8 now, and will be in the gifted program at her school next year, but she is not profoundly gifted at all.  Language is just her really great strength.

post #11 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post


 

 

I honestly have no idea at this point. This is one of those questions that makes me feel like a bad mother because I don't think I ever bothered to count, or if I did at the time, I didn't record it for posterity in a memorial book so it's lost in the mists of time and the blur of raising a family, attending a full-time professional program and working part-time. 

 

I can say that neither child had any significant, noticeable delay in speech. I don't think they stood out  particularly one way or the other. 

 

FWIW, DS is globally gifted, almost equal on all scales, and DD tested quite a bit stronger on the verbal scale, but blows me away with what she does in spatial, non-verbal stuff in real life. 

 

 

 



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post


Although I don't recall much about my kids' expressive speech acquisition - the number of words spoken at various ages - I do recall many people commenting about DS's receptive language abilities and multi-tasking abilities. As a toddler, he would often be deeply absorbed in a conversation while working on a task that required his attention (i.e. splitting his attention), and then suddenly turn around participate in another conversation in such a way that made it clear he had also been following it all along at the same time. 

 

 

 

 

We found this with my DS too who was a little later talker. We knew he had a high receptive vocabulary based on things he could do. For example, he learned all his letters in 1 sitting at the local library. He was 12 months and playing with a letter puzzle. I could ask him for a letter and he'd hand it to me. Under every letter was a picture and he could point to every one without hesitation and without any coaching prior. Compound words really made him laugh and often he'd try to create with toys.... like putting a dollhouse chair over his head and then point to his high chair and they to the "high" chair he'd made.

 

Oh, and Olly, don't feel bad not remembering everything. I remember certain details and because I've been on these sorts of boards since my eldest was 2 and where these questions are often asked. However, I lament not remember many other things like the name of the kids preschool teachers and helpers!

 

 

 

post #12 of 35

Yes, Ollyoxenfree, I only remember my eldest's language milestones because she was referred for intervention at 2 years 3 months as she only had 5 words. If we hadn't been pushed towards that intervention (which turned out to be unnecessary, as her language exploded to advanced levels while she was on the wait-list) I wouldn't remember any milestones. I remember none for my younger three children, except that my 2nd was almost as delayed, and my other two seemed more typical.

 

Miranda

post #13 of 35

It also depends on what you call a 'word'.

 

Early Intervention counted words as any resemblance and consistency for a specific idea/thing ( DD said baa for book and they counted it.. they counted " all-din as two words though she slurred it together : all and done, elp for help, etc).  They also counted 'signs' with consistent vocalizations as words ( other DD did milk sign and said "mmmmmuh"), though I did not in their baby books.

 

 

post #14 of 35

my first dd was doing about 5-10 words by age 1, and then exploded. she was speaking in complete sentences by age 2, so on so forth. And for my second dd- actually, she's deaf, so she didn't talk until she got her coclear implant at age three. in the meantime, by age 2 she had maybe 20-40 signs. we started signing by the time she was 10 mos (when we learned that she was deaf) and signed her first word at 14 mos- pretty fast, in my opinion. also, like her older sister, she just had a huge spurt of language after we started signing and then later speaking to her.
 

 

post #15 of 35
At just shy of her 1st birthday we thought it would be fun to count her words. We stopped when we were getting close to 100 & hadn't really touched on her vocal. We counted both words and signs though, she had a lot of both. She started combing them into larger phrases andnsentences at 14 months. It soundnke your little one might do that soon, it's fun joy.gif
post #16 of 35
Argh, autocorrect is not my friend today.
We didn't pay nearly so much attention to DS's speech development beyond observing that he was slightly slower than his sister. At 2.5 now his speech is adult like apart from a problem with initial "s"s which is fading slowly.
post #17 of 35

DS (not tested) didn't have any words at 12 months (11 months adjusted). At 13 months his first word was "bunny". I remember that at 15 months, DH tried to teach him to say "Mama" properly for my birthday (up until then, it had been an unspecific "mamamama" meaning anything from "Mama" to "I'm afraid" to "I want something"), he managed the day after. At 16 months, his vocabulary started to explode. At 22 months, he was speaking in grammatically correct 8 and 9 word sentences, including subjunctives.

 

DD's development is odd. I don't know whether this is about being second-born, but she will say a word correctly or almost correctly (eg identifying the "cats" at 8 months, finding "tones" in the backyard at 9 months) and then you don't hear it for months or ever again ("cats" sounds more like "yags" now). She cannot enunciate vowels clearly so I have a hunch she often gives up because we don't understand her anyway. "Water" is "ah-er", I could swear she said "DS' slippers" holding them up but it sounds like "ih-eh ih-er". she's doing lots of grunting and pointing. We are hoping for her to have a "language explosions" soon, because she appears clearly frustrated to me.

post #18 of 35

Only my 2E child is tested as gifted, he had probably 10 or so words at age one, I didn't much notice.  He is gifted in visual spatial reasoning/math, and just high average on verbals.  My middle child is not tested but is academically ahead by 3+ years in language arts (and can read at college level with understanding providing she is familiar with the subject matter) and is top of her class in all subjects.  She spoke in conversational paragraphs (including arguing annoyingly eloquently) by one year.  She has picked up her second language really rapidly, so I'm guessing language is a general strong point for her.  My youngest isn't gifted as far as I know (although he's a wicked chess player and great at jigsaw puzzles and Sudoko, so I imagine it counts for something).  He didn't speak more than 5 words until after two years, and sentences were late.

post #19 of 35

My older DD started talking at 8 months and had 11 clear verbal words and maybe 5 signs at age 1.  She had 5 or 6 verbal words before she started signing, lol.  At 18 months she was tested as having the verbal abilities of a 30-month-old.  She still has a fairly precocious vocabulary now, at almost-6. In the realm of related skills, she is also a high-level reader and has excellent spelling skills.

 

My son started talking at 9 months, had 10 words at a year, and has only JUST started stringing together more than 3 words at a time now that he's 2.

post #20 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by stohelit View Post

 From what I've read, gifted children are normally quite early OR quite late talkers.


 

I think a good chance why this is true (that you *hear* about gifted kids either being early talkers or late talkers ) is because it is noteworthy.  I think, when reading about people's experiences, you tend to see a lot of extremes.  Not because there is necessarily a lot of extreme behavior, but because when there is it is commented upon.

 

If you just look through the threads on MDC, you'd assume that there are tons and tons of kids who potty train at 12 months or potty train at 5 years.  I think both of those situations are actually pretty rare, but when they happen it is more likely the parent would mention it.  I know I generally post asking for input when something is out of the ordinary.  I'm not going to come on and say, "Guess what my child had their first word at 12 months, walked at 13 months, potty trained at 2.5, etc..."  because it is so easy to find support/input on those occurrences IRL.  Its when your child is doing something far outside of the norm (either early or late) that you are more likely to talk/write/question about it.

 

I would expect that most gifted children would be *on average* early talkers--- simply because gifted children, by definition, are advanced compared to their same aged peers.  That said, there is a HUGE range of "normal" (using the term normal statistically here) so you are going to see gifted children who do anything quite early and quite late.

 

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