or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Arts & Crafts › Books, Music, and Media › January 2012 Book Challenge
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

January 2012 Book Challenge - Page 2

post #21 of 74

Crow by Barbara Wright

 

I chose this book because it got so many 5 star reviews on amazon.com, plus starred reviews in all the major journals, but I found it pretty slow going until the last couple of chapters, which I admit were quite exciting. It's the story of an African American boy Moses and the prejudicial treatment he and his family receive in a North Carolina town in 1898--very important stuff to hear and the writing was fine, but I really don't see the story keeping 8-12 year olds interested enough to get to the exciting ending, as up until that point the chapters seem very episodic with no big goal that Moses is trying to achieve--which is what I need to keep me turning those pages. There were also adult themes of rape that are hinted at throughout the book. Seems more like a book adults like and think kids should read.

 

 

post #22 of 74


Quote:

Originally Posted by Igraine View Post

1) Someday this pain will be useful to you by Peter Cameron.

 

http://www.npr.org/2011/12/26/143197825/teenage-struggles-in-a-painful-post-sept-11-world

 

A very quick read, but I really enjoyed it. A slightly different take on "teen angst" and the transition time between ending your high school years and moving on to college.

 

 

read that a year or 2 ago & liked it a lot. glad you enjoyed it.

 

 

 


 

 

post #23 of 74

 

January

1. Skipped Parts - Tim Sandlin

2. The Mill River Recluse - Darcie Chan

3. I Used to Know That - Caroline Taggart

4.

 

 

 

*downloaded lots of free books to Nook over the holidays and the 1st week of the year.  DS is on swim team so I have an hour 3x a week to read or craft.  Crafting has taken over but I'm sure I will switch to reading soon. Also subbing is picking back up and that's an excellent time to read as well (I sub for grades 7 and up mostly and they are pretty independent)

post #24 of 74

January

1. Little Bee By Chris Cleave - this is a beautiful story about a horrible situation.  The writing is amazing.

2. Not sure yet, waiting to see what comes in to the library.

 

2011 was my year to begin fiction reading.  My goal was to read 1 fiction book a month and I ended up with 16.  I found a lot of insprition and  suggestions from these threads, but I did not contribute because I was afraid I would jinx myself.

 

 

post #25 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessaroo View Post

January

1. Little Bee By Chris Cleave - this is a beautiful story about a horrible situation.  The writing is amazing.

2. Not sure yet, waiting to see what comes in to the library.

 

2011 was my year to begin fiction reading.  My goal was to read 1 fiction book a month and I ended up with 16.  I found a lot of insprition and  suggestions from these threads, but I did not contribute because I was afraid I would jinx myself.

 

 

I loved "Little Bee" too. Many people I know who read it, had such a hard time with the violence that they were unable to get to the really beautiful parts. I read it twice and did have to skim the "incident" the second time, but I still enjoyed it very much.
 

 

post #26 of 74

 

1. Skipped Parts - Tim Sandlin  (Nook)

2. The Mill River Recluse - Darcie Chan (Nook)

3. I Used to Know That - Caroline Taggart (Nook)

4. Mom Still Likes You Best (audio book) - Jane Isay (Library)

5. The Snow Angel - Glenn Beck  (Library)

6. Hurricanes in Paradise - Denise Hildreth (Nook)

 

 

I think this year I will also track the number of books that are Nook vs library vs actual books purchased.  Hopefully this will help me plan better for 2013 and convince me that I do NOT need to buy physical books.  I'm a visual person and I need to see things like this.  yes I can see the 'books read' on my Nook but what I'm trying to get myself to learn isn't seeping in that way.

 

We are starting to have a clutter problem again.  Books are one of those issues.

post #27 of 74

3) The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest by Stieg Larsson. I, of-course, loved this one as well. Such a ride! I also read that his "life companion", Eva Gabrielsson, is trying to finish the 4th book. but she is fighting a legal battle with Stieg's father and brother.

post #28 of 74

Two great reads--totally different:

 

The Good Father by Noah Hawley

 

When Dr. Paul Allen's son Daniel is accused of assassinating a popular presidential candidate, Dr. Allen tries to find out if his son really did it, and if so, why for God's sake. Maybe it was even his (Dr. Allen's) fault. I could not turn the pages of this book fast enough . . . which seems strange because there really wasn't a lot of action to the book. I guess, like the doctor, I too was anxious to find out what would make someone do such a horrible thing. And though this book was filled more with questions than answers--or probably for just that reason--it's definitely a book I'll be thinking about for a long time. Reminds me of David Vann's writing -- dark, disturbing--not for those looking for a feel-good book, that's for sure.

 

Ditched by Robin Mellom

 

It's prom night and Justina has decided this will be a magical night when her relationship with her best friend Ian, will become more than friends. But things go horribly awry and she ends up ditched, in an actual ditch. As she relates the tragedy of her night to a sympathetic 7-11 clerk, the reader finds out all the messy details. This was a crazy, funny, and touching story that teen girls (and teen girls at heart) won't be able to put down.

post #29 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Igraine View Post

3) The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest by Stieg Larsson. I, of-course, loved this one as well. Such a ride! I also read that his "life companion", Eva Gabrielsson, is trying to finish the 4th book. but she is fighting a legal battle with Stieg's father and brother.



Oooh, I did not know that!  I hope they work it out.

post #30 of 74
Thread Starter 

Before I die by Jenny Downham (Audiobook)

 

16 year old Tessa has been battling leukemia since she was 12.  The book covers her final year of life and the list of things she wants to do before she dies.

 

A tragic and touching story, which I think was even more powerful via audiobook.  I loved the character of Adam.  He was amazing.  There were so many moments where I was yelling at some of the characters, especially Tessa's best friend, or crying right alongside with them.  The ending was poignant, but so beautiful.    

post #31 of 74
Thread Starter 

Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins

 

Final book in the Hunger Games series.  Not as bad as I was expecting, but definitely my least favorite in the series.  Will make a great, action-packed movie, though.  If, or when, they get to it. 

post #32 of 74

4) Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by JK Rowling. We are reading these aloud as a family. My son is reading them independently and is up to book 5. So we are having a lot of fun having our "Harry Potter" discussions.

 

post #33 of 74

Fablehaven: Secrets of the Dragon Sanctuary

 

 

Quote:

Two hidden artifacts have been found. Three more remain unrecovered. More preserves face destruction as the Society of the Evening Star relentlessly pursues new talismans. Reading in Patton's Journal of Secrets, Kendra learns the location of the key to a vault housing one of the artifacts. In order to retrieve it, the Knights of the Dawn must enter a death trap a dragon sanctuary called Wyrmroost. The mission cannot proceed without stealing a sacred object zealously guarded by the centaurs. Anybody seen Seth? The race is on to acquire all five of the artifact keys to the great demon prison. Will the Knights of the Dawn conquer Wyrmroost? Who can stop the Sphinx? Can Vanessa be trusted to help? What artifact will be found next?

 

 

 

 

Really liked this next installment in the series -- especially enjoying the way Seth is developing.

post #34 of 74

The Fault in our Stars by John Green

 

 

I went into this book having no idea what it was about. All I knew was, John Green had come out with a new book and that was enough for me. So, I'm going to give all of you the same option I had to just be completely surprised and blown away. All I will say is that this was both the funniest and saddest book I have ever read. I laughed out loud, I cried real tears . . . sometimes at the same time. This is a brilliant book. And it's not just me . . . the books been out like 3 days and already has 144 5 star reviews on amazon.com.
 
post #35 of 74

5) Turn of Mind by Alice LaPlante. This was a very interesting book.

 

"And then there is Dr. Jennifer White, who narrates Alice LaPlante’s first novel. By the time “Turn of Mind” begins, she is losing her wits to Alzheimer’s disease and is the prime suspect in her best friend’s murder. She is as unreliable as they come. Neither of these facts is fully clear to Jennifer, of course. Her illness has forced her to retire from a celebrated career as an orthopedic surgeon, specializing in hands. Amanda O’Toole, her longtime neighbor and confidante, has been found dead in her Chicago brownstone, four of her fingers expertly severed at the joints. Jennifer cannot, or will not, remember whether she killed Amanda. But something nags at her crumbling memory, “something that resides in a sterile, brightly lit place where there is no room for shadows. The place for blood and bone. Yet shadows exist. And secrets.”

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/17/books/review/book-review-turn-of-mind-by-alice-laplante.html

post #36 of 74

1. Depletion and Abundance: Life on the New Home Front- Sharon Astyk
 

Several times I found myself nodding, even feeling inspired by this book but it was for the most part alarming, anecdotal, irrational in many places, and poorly cited and researched. Google searches and five minutes of research can debunk many of Ms. Asyk's facts leaving me underwhelmed with her entire book. 

 

2. Uncommon Arrangements: Seven Portraits of Married Life in London Literary Circles 1910-1939
 

A slightly more sophisticated version of a gossip rag but interesting nonetheless. The story of Vera Brittain and her insights into youthful love and coming of age during a time of war were especially intriguing to me, some even haunting--particularly her reflections on the intensity of emotion and glamour surrounding the launch of her ill-fated relationship with her fiance, Roland, who was killed in action days before they were to be married. She never got "over" the heightened life and emotional intensity of war and lived with her head in the clouds, never finding a love to compare to her long lost Roland for the rest of her life.

post #37 of 74

3. Free Range Kids- Lenore Skenazy

 

This book is probably excellent for parents new to Skenazy's 'free range ideas" but not the most interesting read for the converted. 

post #38 of 74

State of Wonder by Ann Patchett

 

Such a great book!

post #39 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post

State of Wonder by Ann Patchett

 

Such a great book!



I really enjoyed that one too!

post #40 of 74

The Fault in Our Stars

 

Cathe said everything...seriously, just go read it.  I love Greene's work.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Books, Music, and Media
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Arts & Crafts › Books, Music, and Media › January 2012 Book Challenge